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27

You don't need to decide on all of your movement in advance. There is no "movement phase" in 5e. You can move, see what's around the corner, decide if you want to move further, and so on. You can attack, cast a spell, hide, or whatever else you selected as your action at any point during your turn, and you can move further afterwards. If your action ...


18

Per the rules compendium page 249, you can't shift over any terrain that requires a skill check. So unless you have a swim speed, you can't shift while in water. Here's the excerpt from the Rules Compendium - see the Special Movement Modes section: Shift Action: Move action. Movement: The creature moves 1 square. (Some powers and effects allow ...


14

You don't have to use all 70 feet at once. Your 70 feet could be broken up as small as you want. You could just start moving forward and stop after 35 feet because you noticed something in the distance. As for your comment on how stopping every 5 feet would take more than 6 seconds, your character isn't necessarily stopping. If you move your character 5 feet ...


13

No, Part of the definition of ProneDDI is: You can’t move from your space, although you can teleport, crawl, or be forced to move by a pull, a push, or a slide. Lightning shift does not use one of the forms of movement that can allow a creature to move while prone.


13

No. Rules Compendium, page 232: Immobilized The creature can't move unless it teleports or is pulled, pushed, or slid.


12

In Pathfinder, natural attacks are treated somewhat differently from weapon attacks. There is also a section on natural attacks under the Attack Action (not the Full Attack Action) in the Combat section. But the Combat section clearly says, after talking about all these kinds of attacks (weapon, unarmed, natural) that "A character who can make more than one ...


11

This tangle can be cut through by noting two things: The diagonal rule doesn't apply to movement actions, it applies to measuring distances. (PHB, p. 147) The distance you can move in a round is measured depending on what you're doing, not the number of actions used to do it. Note “Movement in Combat” (PHB, p. 147) talks about total distances, not adding ...


11

No, the rules make no mention of any requirement to perform actions of certain types before actions of certain other types. You have a set number of actions of various types (some of which can be exchanged for others), but you can take them in any order.


11

What you're running into is a problem with tactics, not the rules. If there are two characters that are near eachother, but not adjacent, then you are correct that if the faster combatant moves in close, they will be attacked first. However, they don't have to take the Move or Move and Attack action to get the first strike. Instead, take the Wait action. ...


9

So if a player wanted to stand, spending the move action, but not moving because its not leaving the adjacent square. Does this meet the requirements for ending the ongoing damage? No, it doesn't meet the requirement for ending the ongoing damage. The description for Reaving Damage you quoted says the following: that enemy also takes ongoing 5 damage ...


6

Glide replaces falling. Instead of free-fall, you glide 40 ft. horizontally and 10 ft. vertically each round. This does not take any action on your part (any more than falling does). At least, I think that’s what’s going on. The text is quite odd and if I’m right, you’d kind of expect the text to just say that.


5

Yes, they can continue moving if they have any movement left. An opportunity action takes place before the target finishes its action. After the opportunity attack, the creature resumes its action. [DDI] In order to stop moving you need something like a Fighter's Combat Superiority that specifically stops them from moving farther with that action. ...


5

Starting from the beginning: Action Types In a normal round, you can perform a standard action and a move action, or you can perform a full-round action. You can also perform one or more free actions. You can always take a move action in place of a standard action. A creature without a Move Action is thus left with its Standard Action and Free ...


3

It is not considered a climb speed. You merely climb at your speed, if it was a climb speed it would specify so (rules do only what they say; no more, no less). Thus you can't use Spider Technique as part of a charge. Climbing does not require a free hand I've checked the Compendium and nowhere does it mention needing a free hand to climb. There's ...


3

Standing up does not work in this case The criterion for removing the ongoing damage is not merely spending a move action, but spending a move action to remove the effect. Standing up is spending a move action to stand up, not spending a move action to end the ongoing damage.


3

In order to use Lightning Shift while prone, you need to take one of a number of feats or items: In rough order from least onerous to most: Feet slot: Floorfighter Straps Feat: Low Crawl Acrobat's Boots and other effects: while using a minor to stand up isn't exactly shifting while prone, they allow you to shift on the same turn that you were prone. Still,...


3

Gliding is a movement mode just like burrow, swim, land, or climb. Treat it like flying, but limited as described (descend 5 feet for every 20 feet of horizontal motion). So, you don't get it as a move action or anything, instead you get the normal set of movement options (move, charge, run, etc.) and can take them using this movement mode. I don't have the ...


2

In real life what happens if you are walking in the darkness using the light of your phone? You don't need to stop every few seconds, you just process the new information as it becomes visible and keeps walking. That's exactly what your character does, you may represent that mechanically by stopping after 30', revealing more map, then moving the remaining ...


1

I see two rules that could apply: 1. Surprise round take a standard action during the surprise round (see Standard Actions, page 139). You can also take free actions during the surprise round, at the DM’s discretion. (PHB p. 137) That clearly excludes full round actions like full attack. A charge or withdraw as standard action might apply, though, ...


1

Basically, the real solution to this problem is the "Heroic Charge" Extra Effort option in Martial Arts. If the aggressive, faster fighter doesn't want to take a Wait maneuver, then he would spend one fatigue point and make a Heroic Charge, which is effectively a Move and Attack maneuver without any skill penalties or maximum skill cap. This happens before ...



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