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29

Mounts have several advantages and several disadvantages, especially for adventurers. Here's one Texan's perspective on going horsed vs not. Advantages Ability to carry a lot more grub/gear/loot than you can yourself Keeps you from getting tuckered out from long marches (the horses may get fatigued, but you're still semi-fresh for a fight) Faster ...


23

In fencing you are taught steps that allow you to engage or disengage from an opponent without offering an opening to your enemies blade. I have listed a few examples below: advance - the primary action for forward movement in fencing retreat - the primary action for backward movement in fencing disengage - the act of avoiding the opponent's blade without ...


18

In 4e, the overriding design philosophy is that "specific trumps general" from this, all else emerges. The general case is that Opportunity Actions trigger when: Trigger: Opportunity actions allow you to take an action in response to an enemy letting its guard down. The one type of opportunity action that every combatant can take is an opportunity ...


18

Yes, if at the end of the shift you are not on a threatened square. Shift is a move action that lets you move 1 square without provoking opportunity attacks. You can then convert your standard action to a move action in order to walk away your speed. Note that some creatures may have a reach of 2 squares or more with their basic attacks. These creatures ...


15

Assuming speed 6: A square is 5'. Running gives him two extra squares of movement per move action, so he'll move 8 squares per action. He gets three actions in your scenario; thus, he's moved 24 squares. 24 squares is 120 feet. A round is six seconds. Therefore, the human is moving 120 feet in six seconds, or 20 feet per second. That's 72,000 feet per ...


14

Phasing is a mode of movement (it is listed under the heading of "Movement Related Traits") which allows a creature to ... ignore difficult terrain and ... enter squares containing blocking terrain, obstacles, and enemy creatures. The creature follows normal rules for where it must end its movement.... Rules Compendium p. 208 A phasing creature is ...


13

The mechanics are spelled out in the DMG. They end up working like this: The first monster moves. The first monster readies an action to attack when the second monster is in position (this is a standard action). The second monster moves. The second monster attacks. The first monster resolves its readied action. This allows any group of monsters to move ...


13

The rules (PHB, page 291) say this about opportunity attacks: An opportunity action takes place before the target finishes its action. After the opportunity attack, the creature resumes its action. So, based on this, we know that an opportunity action can happen in the middle of another action. That leaves us with the two possibilities you bring up: ...


13

Unless you are only going a short distance riding is far preferable to walking unless one of the following circumstances is present. You require some amount of stealth or sneakiness for the duration of the journey. Horses are loud, carts are louder. The entire trip is through an uncharted or very dense forest that would make mounted transportation ...


13

The enemy has already committed to a destination square by the time the fighter interrupts their shift. The enemy cannot pick after the immediate interrupt has occurred. There's two things to consider here: the first is when a shift occurs, and the other is when an immediate interrupt occurs within that shift. When does a shift occur? A shift doesn't ...


12

Characters should prefer their own 2 feet to horses/beasts of burden when they will be traveling in either mountainous terrain, jungles, or deserts. Mountains are too steep and rocky for the horses to be able to get sure footing, and precipitous drops on footpaths can sometimes give you the choice of backing up a horse, or risk the horse losing their ...


12

Here is how I'd rule it and why I'd rule it that way. The players are trying to use the stronger characters' abilities to compensate for the smaller characters' shortcomings. That's good thinking, and I want to reward it without encouraging it. My goal is to make them happy that the idea works but to find other solutions, like the smaller characters ...


12

Per the rules compendium page 249, you can't shift over any terrain that requires a skill check. So unless you have a swim speed, you can't shift while in water. Here's the excerpt from the Rules Compendium - see the Special Movement Modes section: Shift Action: Move action. Movement: The creature moves 1 square. (Some powers and effects allow ...


12

From the Rules Compendium, page 212: No Opportunity Actions Triggered: When a target is pulled, pushed, or slid, it does not trigger opportunity actions, such as opportunity attacks, that are triggered by movement. From the Rules Compendium, page 214: No Opportunity Actions Triggered: When a target teleports, it doesn't provoke opportunity actions, ...


12

They're not saying you cannot run as in you cannot move faster than normal, but instead that you cannot use the Run action to move 4x your speed in one round. Double your speed is the limit (double move or Charge action). I'm not sure why the limitation -- probably for balance, because the speed given by Fly is faster than most natural movement speeds -- but ...


11

Mostly Pathfinder's (and 3.5's) "5-foot step" move action is almost the same as 4e's "shift" move action. Both let you move one (5-foot) square without provoking any OA/AoO attacks. Note that there are 2 differences: in 4e, shifting can be one half of a double move, but in 3.5/Pathfinder it cannot, since in 3.5/Pathfinder you can't take a 5-foot step in ...


11

Sort of, but not really. A 4th edition shift is similar in that you can spend a move action to shift* one square without provoking an opportunity attack, but the similarities end there. *this is the closest thing to a 5-foot step, you can't just say "a shift" While any character can use a move action to shift 1 square, there is no direct analogy between a ...


11

Ok, Let's examine the situation that would allow for this: A monster is moving past you, allowing for an opportunity attack, towards a square that is 2 square away from your current location. As he moves past you make your opportunity attack using fading strike and move into his intended destination. This is a legal move according to both the power and the ...


11

No, you can't move diagonally past a wall, but you can move past a solid object as long as it doesn't completely fill the corner (as in, you actually have room to slip past it). You could probably slip past a barrel, but not a crate filling its square. Yes, you can move past an enemy creature diagonally, and thus move to their other side in two diagonal ...


10

This is of the Acrobatics skill is now a hard DC check by rule thanks to errata. I believe this originated with the Rules Compendium. The listing in DDI has also been updated: Improvising with Acrobatics Slide down a staircase on a shield while standing (hard DC) Somersault over a creature of the same size (hard DC) Swing from a chandelier (moderate DC) ...


10

My interpretation is that it would take damage once for that movement. When the monster first enters the flame (second diagram), it has entered the wall's space and takes damage. In the third diagram, the monster is not "moving into the wall's space" because it is ALREADY in the wall's space. So far as the 3-square movement penalty is concerned, the ...


10

After 8 hours and 1 second of walking, you roll a first DC10 Constitution check. If you fail, you take 1d6 of non-lethal damage and feel fatigue if they take that damage. If you decide to go beyond that, for each additional hour of walking, you need to roll again vs DC12, then DC14 etc. Notice the absence of equation in the statement. It's not DC10 +2 per ...


10

There are three basic answers to this, and it's entirely viable to mix and match them as best fits your character. The most important books to own, at least if you want to easily add this kind of feature to any character, are Complete Champion and/or Tome of Battle: Book of Nine Swords. Without these, you will have to dedicate a lot of resources (read: ...


10

Opportunity attacks are interrupts triggered by attempting to leave an adjacent square "Leaving an adjacent square to enter another adjacent square" is just as much "leaving an adjacent square" as is "leaving an adjacent square to enter a non-adjacent square." It's not about leaving his reach entirely, it's about leaving a square he threatens. If I'm ...


10

No, a creature cannot use its fly speed while prone Prone The creature is lying down. However, if the creature is climbing or flying, it falls. The only way the creature can move is by crawling, teleporting, or being pulled, pushed, or slid. (Rules Compendium 232, but the DMG says the same thing in different words on page 47) So when a ...


10

Preface A rider and their mount share a single character's set of actions (one standard, move and minor action, one immediate action between turns). The player may use each action on either the rider or the mount. Most commonly, you'll have the mount take a move action and the rider take a standard action to attack. Importantly, though: the mount and rider ...


9

I've already done the math for this, so I just posted it in case anyone else was interested. A few things need to be factored in, here. First, we need to establish the presumption that the Human in question is not using any equipment or feats that enhance or restrict his speed. Then, we have our first important value: Human's Speed = 6 squares (PHB, p. ...


9

From the Rules Compendium pg 314: While phasing, a creature ignores difficult terrain, and it can enter squares containing enemies, blocking terrain, or other obstacles. The creature follows the normal rules for where it must end its movement (normally an unoccupied space). The rules for opportunity attacks are always stated pretty clearly so I would say ...


9

The definition for crashing indicates that ground level (not-flying) is zero (0). Per DDI : Crashing Falling while Flying: If a creature falls while it is flying, it descends the full distance of the fall but is likely to take less damage than a creature that can’t fly. Subtract the creature’s fly speed (in feet) from the distance of the fall, then figure ...


9

Only Gentry and Nobles Ride Horses!!! The primary reason PC's would walk instead of ride would be that they are not nobles nor elves. In most realistic settings, a horse is a status symbol of the gentry and nobility. In many real world timeframes, a non-noble on horse was subject to harsh, sometimes even capital, punishments. As in, many lashes or even ...



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