Hot answers tagged

57

Short simple answer here. No you can't, you can only mount or dismount once per turn. Player's Handbook, page 198: Mounting and Dismounting Once during your move, you can mount a creature that is within 5 feet of you or dismount.


40

This question is an example of how a DM should deal the concept of Rules Lawyer vs Playability in the game. Given the way the rules are written, there's a loophole that can be exploited. Yes, it's possible to string those actions together. However, logically, take a minute to think about what you ask. In a round (which is 6 seconds), can you: move 120', ...


36

Check out the Player's Handbook, page 192: Squeezing into a Smaller Space: A creature can squeeze through a space that is large enough for a creature one size smaller than it. Thus, a Large creature can squeeze through a passage that's only 5 feet wide. While squeezing through a space, a creature must spend 1 extra foot for every foot it moves there, ...


35

Cunning Action absolutely does let you Dash again, but Dash doesn't work quite like you're remembering (PHB, p. 192): When you take the Dash action, you gain extra movement for the current turn. The increase equals your speed, after applying any modifiers. So it's not multiplying your speed, it's adding your speed to your speed. With only one Dash, ...


35

Players Basic Rules, pg 71 Moving Around Other Creatures If you leave a hostile creature’s reach during your move, you provoke an opportunity attack, as explained later in the chapter. and, Players Basic Rules, pg 73 Opportunity Attacks You can make an opportunity attack when a hostile creature that you can see moves out of your ...


32

You are correct; movement may be resumed after an Attack of Opportunity. Movement is "spent" by the foot; as in, if a creature has a movement speed of "30ft", then they can spend that much speed during a move action. If they are interrupted by an opportunity attack after 10ft, then they still have 20ft left to spend. To further support this, look at the ...


30

Mounts have several advantages and several disadvantages, especially for adventurers. Here's one Texan's perspective on going horsed vs not. Advantages Ability to carry a lot more grub/gear/loot than you can yourself Keeps you from getting tuckered out from long marches (the horses may get fatigued, but you're still semi-fresh for a fight) Faster ...


27

I'd say that this is against the spirit of the rules and an exploit, and disallow it. Don't forget that the DM has much more opportunity to exploit the rules than you do, and if you're playing strictly to the letter then you're gonna run into problems with any system. It highly reminds of of the peasant rail gun, which to quickly summarize: Get roughly ...


27

You don't need to decide on all of your movement in advance. There is no "movement phase" in 5e. You can move, see what's around the corner, decide if you want to move further, and so on. You can attack, cast a spell, hide, or whatever else you selected as your action at any point during your turn, and you can move further afterwards. If your action ...


26

...when the creature enters the area for the first time on a turn or starts its turn there... The orcs are not entering the area, the area is changing to include them. So, your hypothetical cleric rides within 15 feet of 48 orcs, but the damage is only dealt to the last ten or so that are still within 10 feet of him when their turns start.


25

In fencing you are taught steps that allow you to engage or disengage from an opponent without offering an opening to your enemies blade. I have listed a few examples below: advance - the primary action for forward movement in fencing retreat - the primary action for backward movement in fencing disengage - the act of avoiding the opponent's blade without ...


25

Movement in any direction costs 1' per 1'. There is no reason within the rules to limit vertical movement. The only modification to 1'=1' is that if you are using 5' squares, diagonal movement does not carry additional cost unless that option is also being used.


23

There are two different things happening here: your movement speed being halved, and spending half your movement speed. These work differently, and the order matters. The end result is that the grappler can't move-drag after standing up from prone. Here's how it works: You start with your full movement speed. Let's use 60′ for the sake of example. ...


22

From the Movement and Position section on page 70 of the Player's Basic Rules: On your turn, you can move a distance up to your speed. You can use as much or as little of your speed as you like on your turn, following the rules here. Your movement can include jumping, climbing, and swimming. These different modes of movement can be combined ...


21

According to Jeremy Crawford, one of the designers of 5e, this is the intended behavior: When a spell's description uses "enter" in relation to an AoE, the entering has to be voluntary only if the text says so. That tweet was part of a conversation specifically about Spirit Guardians, so it seems like the designer intent was exactly as you say: moving ...


21

Yes, kinda. This means that you are moving half speed during whatever action you use to move. If you move one move action, you need to move half speed - in other words, every 5' of movement costs you 10' of movement. If you have a 30' move, then yes, you can use two move actions while moving at half speed during each, moving 30' total in the round and ...


19

Yes, if at the end of the shift you are not on a threatened square. Shift is a move action that lets you move 1 square without provoking opportunity attacks. You can then convert your standard action to a move action in order to walk away your speed. Note that some creatures may have a reach of 2 squares or more with their basic attacks. These creatures ...


19

Treat this as a case of multiple speeds The Player's Handbook (p190) states: If you have more than one speed, such as your walking speed and a flying speed, you can switch back and forth between your speeds during your move. Whenever you switch, subtract the distance you've already moved from the new speed.... If the result is 0 or less, you can't use ...


19

While the rules don't specifically state that you can break up your movement an unlimited number of times, that certainly seems to be the case. You can break up your movement on your turn, using some of your speed before and after your action. For example, if you have a speed of 30 feet, you can move 10 feet, take your action, and then move 20 feet....


18

In 4e, the overriding design philosophy is that "specific trumps general" from this, all else emerges. The general case is that Opportunity Actions trigger when: Trigger: Opportunity actions allow you to take an action in response to an enemy letting its guard down. The one type of opportunity action that every combatant can take is an opportunity ...


18

Per the rules compendium page 249, you can't shift over any terrain that requires a skill check. So unless you have a swim speed, you can't shift while in water. Here's the excerpt from the Rules Compendium - see the Special Movement Modes section: Shift Action: Move action. Movement: The creature moves 1 square. (Some powers and effects allow ...


18

There are three basic answers to this, and it's entirely viable to mix and match them as best fits your character. The most important books to own, at least if you want to easily add this kind of feature to any character, are Complete Champion and/or Tome of Battle: Book of Nine Swords. Without these, you will have to dedicate a lot of resources (read: ...


18

Technically, Yes In the section Nonlethal Damage in the subsection Healing Nonlethal Damage the Player's Handbook says You heal nonlethal damage at the rate of 1 hit point per hour per character level. For example, a 7th-level wizard heals 7 points of nonlethal damage each hour until all the nonlethal damage is gone. (146) A forced march requires a ...


18

The skill description is silent about that There are no anatomical pre-requisites for the use of the Jump skill written directly into the description, only requiring a running start and a (land) movement speed, so you can use the skill properly. This may be an answer to your question: You can use the jump skill, as long as you have land movement speed. ...


17

It is legal, yes. Note that move actions are defined one square at a time. The running enemy could choose to stop when you teleport in to threaten them. But if they don’t, and leave a threatened square, they provoke from you.


16

No. Shifting counts as a second move action. What you'd be doing is "walking" or "running," then Shifting. Each of those takes a move action. (Rules Compendium, p. 203)


16

This PC can move diagonally. Doing so does not involve moving through a hostile creature's square. (See PHB p.192: Variant: Playing on a Grid) Characters (and monsters) can move diagonally like they do horizontally and vertically, as a one-square move. From the Entering a Square section we can tell that moving into a diagonal square doesn't involve moving ...


16

Sure. You can describe your Mobile halfling's movement however you want; something like parkour or freerunning is certainly an option. Just remember you don't get any other benefits beyond what is defined by the feat; the DM could reasonably call for Dexterity (Acrobatics) checks if you want to move in ways not allowed by Mobile. Your breakdown of the ...


16

Fighters can. Action surge means you can use one action to dash, and the other to attack. Using action surge is a feature, and does not require a bonus action. Outside of that feature... Bonus actions aside seems to be a weird stipulation to put on this being that that is pretty much the only way you could both dash and attack. You move on your turn, and ...


15

Assuming speed 6: A square is 5'. Running gives him two extra squares of movement per move action, so he'll move 8 squares per action. He gets three actions in your scenario; thus, he's moved 24 squares. 24 squares is 120 feet. A round is six seconds. Therefore, the human is moving 120 feet in six seconds, or 20 feet per second. That's 72,000 feet per hour,...



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