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56

Short simple answer here. No you can't, you can only mount or dismount once per turn. Player's Handbook, page 198: Mounting and Dismounting Once during your move, you can mount a creature that is within 5 feet of you or dismount.


39

This question is an example of how a DM should deal the concept of Rules Lawyer vs Playability in the game. Given the way the rules are written, there's a loophole that can be exploited. Yes, it's possible to string those actions together. However, logically, take a minute to think about what you ask. In a round (which is 6 seconds), can you: move 120', ...


30

Mounts have several advantages and several disadvantages, especially for adventurers. Here's one Texan's perspective on going horsed vs not. Advantages Ability to carry a lot more grub/gear/loot than you can yourself Keeps you from getting tuckered out from long marches (the horses may get fatigued, but you're still semi-fresh for a fight) Faster ...


30

You are correct; movement may be resumed after an Attack of Opportunity. Movement is "spent" by the foot; as in, if a creature has a movement speed of "30ft", then they can spend that much speed during a move action. If they are interrupted by an opportunity attack after 10ft, then they still have 20ft left to spend. To further support this, look at the ...


28

Cunning Action absolutely does let you Dash again, but Dash doesn't work quite like you're remembering (PHB, p. 192): When you take the Dash action, you gain extra movement for the current turn. The increase equals your speed, after applying any modifiers. So it's not multiplying your speed, it's adding your speed to your speed. With only one Dash, ...


26

I'd say that this is against the spirit of the rules and an exploit, and disallow it. Don't forget that the DM has much more opportunity to exploit the rules than you do, and if you're playing strictly to the letter then you're gonna run into problems with any system. It highly reminds of of the peasant rail gun, which to quickly summarize: Get roughly ...


25

In fencing you are taught steps that allow you to engage or disengage from an opponent without offering an opening to your enemies blade. I have listed a few examples below: advance - the primary action for forward movement in fencing retreat - the primary action for backward movement in fencing disengage - the act of avoiding the opponent's blade without ...


21

Yes, kinda. This means that you are moving half speed during whatever action you use to move. If you move one move action, you need to move half speed - in other words, every 5' of movement costs you 10' of movement. If you have a 30' move, then yes, you can use two move actions while moving at half speed during each, moving 30' total in the round and ...


20

...when the creature enters the area for the first time on a turn or starts its turn there... The orcs are not entering the area, the area is changing to include them. So, your hypothetical cleric rides within 15 feet of 48 orcs, but the damage is only dealt to the last ten or so that are still within 10 feet of him when their turns start.


19

Yes, if at the end of the shift you are not on a threatened square. Shift is a move action that lets you move 1 square without provoking opportunity attacks. You can then convert your standard action to a move action in order to walk away your speed. Note that some creatures may have a reach of 2 squares or more with their basic attacks. These creatures ...


18

In 4e, the overriding design philosophy is that "specific trumps general" from this, all else emerges. The general case is that Opportunity Actions trigger when: Trigger: Opportunity actions allow you to take an action in response to an enemy letting its guard down. The one type of opportunity action that every combatant can take is an opportunity ...


18

There are three basic answers to this, and it's entirely viable to mix and match them as best fits your character. The most important books to own, at least if you want to easily add this kind of feature to any character, are Complete Champion and/or Tome of Battle: Book of Nine Swords. Without these, you will have to dedicate a lot of resources (read: ...


18

Per the rules compendium page 249, you can't shift over any terrain that requires a skill check. So unless you have a swim speed, you can't shift while in water. Here's the excerpt from the Rules Compendium - see the Special Movement Modes section: Shift Action: Move action. Movement: The creature moves 1 square. (Some powers and effects allow ...


18

Technically, Yes In the section Nonlethal Damage in the subsection Healing Nonlethal Damage the Player's Handbook says You heal nonlethal damage at the rate of 1 hit point per hour per character level. For example, a 7th-level wizard heals 7 points of nonlethal damage each hour until all the nonlethal damage is gone. (146) A forced march requires a ...


18

Treat this as a case of multiple speeds The Player's Handbook (p190) states: If you have more than one speed, such as your walking speed and a flying speed, you can switch back and forth between your speeds during your move. Whenever you switch, subtract the distance you've already moved from the new speed.... If the result is 0 or less, you can't use ...


17

It is legal, yes. Note that move actions are defined one square at a time. The running enemy could choose to stop when you teleport in to threaten them. But if they don’t, and leave a threatened square, they provoke from you.


16

No. Shifting counts as a second move action. What you'd be doing is "walking" or "running," then Shifting. Each of those takes a move action. (Rules Compendium, p. 203)


16

According to Jeremy Crawford, one of the designers of 5e, this is the intended behavior: When a spell's description uses "enter" in relation to an AoE, the entering has to be voluntary only if the text says so. That tweet was part of a conversation specifically about Spirit Guardians, so it seems like the designer intent was exactly as you say: moving ...


15

Assuming speed 6: A square is 5'. Running gives him two extra squares of movement per move action, so he'll move 8 squares per action. He gets three actions in your scenario; thus, he's moved 24 squares. 24 squares is 120 feet. A round is six seconds. Therefore, the human is moving 120 feet in six seconds, or 20 feet per second. That's 72,000 feet per ...


15

Movement Speed Matters Movement speed matters. If you're a low level caster with very limited HP and want to cast a spell, you don't want some melee guy taking attacks of opportunity when you do. If you're that melee guy, you don't want to let the spellcaster get away so he can cast freely. The movement speeds relative to each other matter in that kind of ...


14

Here is how I'd rule it and why I'd rule it that way. The players are trying to use the stronger characters' abilities to compensate for the smaller characters' shortcomings. That's good thinking, and I want to reward it without encouraging it. My goal is to make them happy that the idea works but to find other solutions, like the smaller characters ...


14

The mechanics are spelled out in the DMG. They end up working like this: The first monster moves. The first monster readies an action to attack when the second monster is in position (this is a standard action). The second monster moves. The second monster attacks. The first monster resolves its readied action. This allows any group of monsters to move ...


14

No, you cannot move via Lightning Rush while prone. You can use Lightning Rush against the enemy adjacent to you as the Move part is an effect. Being unable to do it does not limit your attack in any way. Lightning Rush: Effect: Before the attack, you move your speed to a square adjacent to the triggering enemy. Ok, so before the attack you move, ...


14

Phasing is a mode of movement (it is listed under the heading of "Movement Related Traits") which allows a creature to ... ignore difficult terrain and ... enter squares containing blocking terrain, obstacles, and enemy creatures. The creature follows normal rules for where it must end its movement.... Rules Compendium p. 208 A phasing creature is ...


14

It’s very difficult to prove a negative, but I am reasonably confident that no rule in 3.5 or Pathfinder explicitly states that all armors of a given weight class slow you down by the same amount. In 3.5, at least, there were certainly a few super-heavy armors that reduced the speed by more than your typical heavy armor (Races of Stone had a couple of ...


14

The same thing that would happen if you weren't insubstantial. From the RC, p226: While a creature is insubstantial, it takes half damage from any attack that deals damage to it. Ongoing damage is also halved. Nothing in there about it being easier or harder to swim. Insubstantial halves damage from most sources, and that's about it. You'll notice it ...


13

Unless you are only going a short distance riding is far preferable to walking unless one of the following circumstances is present. You require some amount of stealth or sneakiness for the duration of the journey. Horses are loud, carts are louder. The entire trip is through an uncharted or very dense forest that would make mounted transportation ...


13

The rules (PHB, page 291) say this about opportunity attacks: An opportunity action takes place before the target finishes its action. After the opportunity attack, the creature resumes its action. So, based on this, we know that an opportunity action can happen in the middle of another action. That leaves us with the two possibilities you bring up: ...


13

The enemy has already committed to a destination square by the time the fighter interrupts their shift. The enemy cannot pick after the immediate interrupt has occurred. There's two things to consider here: the first is when a shift occurs, and the other is when an immediate interrupt occurs within that shift. When does a shift occur? A shift doesn't ...


13

They're not saying you cannot run as in you cannot move faster than normal, but instead that you cannot use the Run action to move 4x your speed in one round. Double your speed is the limit (double move or Charge action). I'm not sure why the limitation -- probably for balance, because the speed given by Fly is faster than most natural movement speeds -- but ...



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