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I suspect there is some wording here that's a holdover from earlier versions of D&D, when instruments were grouped into types within the perform skill as follows: Keyboard instruments (harpsichord, piano, pipe organ) Percussion instruments (bells, chimes, drums, gong) String instruments (fiddle, harp, lute, mandolin) Wind instruments (flute, pan pipes, ...


2

While the quoted list is about items, i will read it as a guideline for classes of instruments. A bard who can play a lyre can probably play an harp too, because they have a similiar technique. Instead a bard that can play a lute would have an hard time with a cello performance: in guitar (classical one at least) you don't use the bow to make the strings ...


4

The two Pipe magic items require the following. You must be proficient with wind instruments to use these pipes Since Wind instruments are not defined as a game term we have to look to what it means in English. I recommend looking at the the following Wikipedia article on Wind Instruments. Along with the Woodwind article due to D&D 5e's focus on ...


28

The scope of "types of instrument" is illustrated by the PHB The full text of the passage you quote from says: Musical Instrument. Several of the most common types of musical instruments are shown on the table as examples. If you have proficiency with a given musical instrument you can add your proficiency bonus to any ability checks you make to play ...



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