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35

Definitely. It's easy to think of the I-kill-you-and-use-your-corpse, or the standard graverobber. But what about someone who actually seeks the consent of those bodies? The kingsguard wishes to continue serving even beyond their deaths, the elves wronged by the evil overlord wish to become warriors before they become fertilizer. Remember too that necromancy ...


30

Of course, depending on your definition of necromancer. Can you be creating undead as a necromancer and stay good? No, that's an evil descriptor spell. Good clerics can't cast those at all, and good wizards can but like any evil act it'll move them from Good sooner or later. Can you cast the dozens of other necromancy spells that aren't evil, like Disrupt ...


17

First, there is a template for a good necromancer in one of the expanded books. I found this Good Lich template online today. The following is a long explanation I posted for my players about my world specifically. It goes into a lot of details and interprets some of the logic of the books in a way that hopefully helps explain why Necromancers tend toward ...


17

is there anything stopping the Good-aligned 'Necromancer'? There shouldn’t really be one anyway. Is there anything stopping you using Animate Objects, with or without Permanency, to affect a bunch of corpses? If so, what? And would that qualify as an Evil, Chaotic, or Neutral act? I believe corpses are objects, on the basis of the definition of an ...


13

Comparing their descriptions in the SRD: animate object and animate dead differ in these ways. Animate object is a 6th level spell; animate dead is 4th, or third for a Cleric. Animate dead is a permanent, instantaneous transformation; animate object is 1 round per level. Animated dead can follow you around and do tasks or attack; animated objects can only ...


13

Creatures Can't Add Levels Because of Necromancy Gazoo the necromancer can't just cast the spell animate dead [necro] (PH 198-9) and make any ol' corpse into a ghoul and add 2 levels of fighter to it. That can't happen. There shouldn't be any way to create creatures and, during their creation, add new class levels to them because of necromancy. When the ...


12

The description for Resurrection includes "You can resurrect someone killed by a death effect or someone who has been turned into an undead creature and then destroyed." (emphasis mine) That indicates to me that a) you cannot resurrect someone who has been turned undead until that undead creature has been destroyed and b) that it is possible to resurrect ...


11

In Mysteries Revised there is: A path to immortality called living ghost (IIRC) which is obviously relevant to necromancy There is also the spirit familiar virtue which can be appropriate for ghosts. Hermetic empowerment, which is a virtue that allows you to trap a spirit in an enchanted device and use it to power ritual effects (ritual effects in an ...


11

The player handbook page 118, when describing the School of Necromancy subclass feature says: Most people see necromancers as menacing , or even villainous, due to the close association of death. Not all necromancers are evil , but the forces they manipulate are considered taboo by many societies. There is room in the novels for non evil necromancers ...


10

You're mistaken about the need for a body, and the function of these spells. According to the spells' descriptions, resurrection does require at least "some small portion" of the deceased body. True resurrection is capable of "bringing back someone whose body is destroyed," so long as you have the correct information. In no case will raise dead, ...


9

What stops the 6th-level Clr spell animate objects [trans] (PH 199) from making corpses dance is that Corpses Aren't Objects The game defines creature as a "living or otherwise active being, not an object" (PH 306). The game defines active only with regard to spells (e.g. the skill Concentration (PH 69-70)), but this is also addressed below. The game ...


8

You don’t get separate animate dead control pools from cleric and wizard, so you only get 32 HD, not 64. Undead from Rebuke Undead are in addition to this. From the Revised Necromancer Handbook: You are not going to play a True Necromancer! A lot of people love the True Necromancer, even though it’s a completely crippled class. Even a Mystic ...


7

One of the most excellent Dragon magazine articles I ever read covers this very issue. The article is Shades of Death by Wade Nudson, appearing in Dragon #298 (August 2002, page 63). It provides justifications for necromancers of both neutral and good alignments, known as the Gray Path and the White Path, respectively. Necromancers of the Gray Path ...


7

I once read an article about "white necromancers". It's for Pathfinder, but it could easily be adapted to other editions of D&D. White Necromancers fight against undead using necromancy. They don't use it for summoning undead, but to banish them. Otherwise, I can't really imagine someone who is stealing corpses from graveyards and animating them to ...


7

From the description of the Necromancy school in the basic rules v1 (emphasis mine) Necromancy spells manipulate the energies of life and death. Such spells can grant an extra reserve of life force, drain the life energy from another creature, create the undead, or even bring the dead back to life. Creating the undead through the use of ...


6

In the situation you posit, there is a resurrected PC and what was his corpse in the hands of an antagonistic necromancer. The problems arise from under-specification of Resurrection and True Resurrection and where the new body springs into existence. The simple reading is that the magic creates a new body for the dead character's soul to inhabit within ...


5

I like LitheOhm's answer, and I can think of quite a few ways for a non-evil necromancer to be played. Again, this depends on the setting. How, you ask? Here's one way: think of the concept of purgatory. In Christianity, this is a temporary state of purification for people who have passed away with minor sins, before they are allowed into heaven. Now ...


5

He would be moved away. But only if his Wizard fellow considers him an enemy... (see the Target entry for the Spirit RendDDI power). The RevenantDDI is, in fact, considered an undead creature because of its Undead trait: Undead: You are considered an undead creature for the purpose of effects that relate to the undead keyword. You are also considered a ...


5

As said before, the resurrection spells can't duplicate a body. You may, however, want to look into the various magical abilities that do let you duplicate a body. Whether the PCs must be compliant in this act or not is debatable, so be careful if there are any rules-lawyers in your group. Alchemical Simalcrum (and friends) Simalcrum (and friends) This ...


5

RAW, no. The Undeath word just says "raise as skeletons or zombies." It does not say "as animate dead" or have any other verbiage allowing a RAW variant. Variants say they may be created by animate dead but not other things kinda like it. Of course it's completely reasonable to do so, but if you're strict about RAW then you're on the wrong side of it.


4

The spell word text is not clear about mentioning that variants are not permitted. The Animate Dead spell also says nothing about variants (except in notes of the editor, regarding rules about interaction between variants and the spell found in the variant monster rules, not the spell). Also, in the same page, you can see there is a lesser version of Animate ...


4

As far as canon goes, nothing in True Resurrection says it doesn't create a second body, and you're the GM, so that's all you need (and you don't even need that, really). As far as headaches, in theory a player might argue that you are violating the rules, and how dare you? But I don't think that's likely from what you say about your group. Violating ...


4

There was a 2nd Edition product, the Complete Book of Necromancers. It was a blue DM option splat book. CBoN divided necromancy into white, gray, and black, and Animate Dead could be used by a necromancer of any color. The book itself had a line about it not being the animation that's evil, it's what you do with them afterward. Skeleton or zombie carrying ...


4

Here's an answer based on a historical Christian context rather than D&D: The tropes around necromancy and undead found in roleplaying games are based on a mix of folk tales (of vampires, ghosts, etc.) and medival Christian beliefs that saw necromancy as a real sin the Church needed to deal with. Necromancy was a very common accusation in witch trials. ...


4

I hate to be the one to be in the negative here, but I have to disagree with the majority of posters here. For 3.5 system (including FR) necromancy is an evil act. In addition to the "Evil" descriptor on the spells that do this, there is a direct answer to this question. (BTW, characters are unable to cast spells of the opposing alignment whether it's ...


4

In regard to the limits of magic vs necromancy, that is where the discovery rules can be used to circumvent or edge away from Hermetic limits. That said, the only two real limits I see as being present are the restoration of fatigue levels (energy) and the limit of the Divine (see the Ars base book). Your real limiting factor will be duration of the effects ...


4

From the Basic rules (Player's book, v0.2) Necromancy spells manipulate the energies of life and death. Such spells can grant an extra reserve of life force, drain the life energy from another creature, create the undead, or even bring the dead back to life. So, you could be a necromancer who focuses on the "life" side of their powers. I'd say ...


3

Presuming that you mean raising an army of undead, the answer is no in most settings. Raising an undead creature is intrinsically does something bad with their body and soul (see discussion at Does an intelligent undead contain a soul). It's something that few would consent to, and then usually unwisely. However, in the Eberron setting there are positive ...


3

I believe that it only depends on how do you develop your character background. D&D usually depicts necromancers and undead creatures as being evil, however there are some exceptions. In Forgotten Realms elves can become Baelnorns (good liches). Expanding the idea to non-D&D scenarios, the necromancers of Diablo II are bounded to neutral morality.


2

The core rules of 3.5e DnD define necromancy, the channeling of negative energies for any use, to be an evil act no matter who utilizes those energies. They are especially clear that raising corpses to serve your desires is also completely and unequivocably evil. This is for the standard setting of DnD 3.5e (and probably 4.0 as well). This does not ...



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