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7

Yes It is actually possible to obtain a permanent skeleton companion. That being said, it is a slightly convoluted process that is not without certain shortcomings. This method involves using two spells in conjunction: Finger of Death A humanoid killed by this spell rises at the start of your next turn as a zombie that is permanently under your ...


1

You cannot get a true permanent skeleton companion per RaW. You could get a GM to be ok with you reskining the Zombie from Finger of Death as a Skeleton. You could try to convince them that ripping the flesh off the Zombie wouldn't kill it. Failing those you can set up a semi-automatic version, so you don't have to do Step 1 Create a skeleton with ...


6

You could, theoretically, control any of those creatures, but only for a short period of time. Since all of those creatures have 12 or higher Intelligence, you could have control of them for a little while, after which they are free and angry at you. Now, you could just control minor undead, but by 14th level, that has almost no practical uses. (Side Note: ...


7

It doesn't have a usage limit, but It does have a control limit on the number of undead. The answer to how many can you control at a time is in the complete feature description: If it fails, it becomes friendly to you and obeys your commands until you use this feature again. This effectively limits your Command Undead to One Undead type creature, ...


7

The higher their intelligence, the more likely they are to succeed on their charisma saving throw against the ability (DC=your wizard spell save DC). If the target has an intelligence of 8 or higher, it has advantage on the saving throw. If it fails the saving throw and has an Intelligence of 12 or higher it can repeat the saving throw at the end of ...


0

inured: "accustom (someone) to something, especially something unpleasant." (google search definition) You have become accustomed to undeath. The side effect of this is that you are partially immune to undeath effects. The first sentence lists some hard mechanical effects this has. The second sentence provides context, which may have additional ...


2

The first sentence describes all game rules. The second sentence is just role-playing flavor without any mechanical relevance, because "the worst effects of dealing with undead and the forces that animate them" is not a properly defined concept. Regarding the question "Do I become ugly like a zombie?" - if anything it makes you less likely to become an ...


15

The second sentence is simply the description/justification for the first sentence. The only effects are the ones described: resistance to necrotic damage and immunity to maximum hit point reduction. In case it's the source of your confusion: "inured" just means "accustomed to". So this is just saying that you've been hanging around with undead for so long ...



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