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2

In A One Shot If the game is a one-off (or totally episodic), then ending right after killing the big bad isn't all that bad a plan. There are other options, however. You can have them face a few more villains, or even have to get back to town. Which I would do depends highly upon time left. If I have an hour or two left in the schedule, it's definitely ...


1

It depends if it's a "one-shot" or part of a longer campaign, and whether you've finished the adventure, or run out of time first. If it's part of a longer campaign, and you've finished the adventure, I'd usually end it after the party get back to town. They can divide their loot, sell off unwanted items, go shopping for that magical item they've been ...


9

Managing the end of the game I'm very visual so I tend to think in terms of movies or tv shows. So if it's not a continuing game where cliffhangers make sense, then I wrap it up and maybe ask a few questions to give the players some input. "You come home and the elders greet you and feast you! You're the heroes and a celebration is held..." "Did ...


5

Choose your Moment A session should usually end at the end of a scene (unless you're doing a cliffhanger ending). Let the final scene reach its natural conclusion then tell your players "That's all for tonight. Thank you for playing." You don't need to use those exact words, but the idea is to have a firm statement that the action is over, and a positive ...


4

Ending the Game In general, I don't end a session immediately after a boss fight (or any fight, really) unless I'm pressed for time. Typically I allow (it's more of an unspoken requirement really) my players to return to town/home base/wilderness camp/whatever-the-next-goal-in-the-game-is and I attempt to foster a small social encounter between the PCs. ...


-3

Generally, I would end the campaign with a conversation with the person who commissioned the campaign in the first place. It could be as simple as "Well, you slew the dragon that has been terrorizing us, so we like to have a party in your favor." And the party rides off into the sunset. This is a good time for the party to discuss what the different PCs ...


0

I see your group is quite small and you seem to know each other from outside of the game, so just asking him to leave might not be the easiest or best solution. I've got a few alternatives for you. Know the rules You really should know the rules, so you can play by them without looking them up. Whenever you don't know something, rather than looking it ...


0

Welcome to the Adventure!! There's a lot of good answers here, but seeing has I've only (really) started now Role-Playing, I've been "there" recentely, "where to start?" and "How to do it?", and been answering a lot to new players of my group aswell. What is role-playing!! Basically , Role-Playing (games) is like a theater play, but instead of you just ...


5

My group uses a private Google+ community to organise the games, and G+ alongside Roll20 to play the games. We play entirely online on a weekly basis, mainly because we're all about the same age and have small children and families, so it's difficult to get together for a face to face game. For D&D 5th Ed you're pretty spoiled for choice, but when it ...


3

I am currently playing a 5th edition game as DM but with only 2 players - a long-time D&D associate and my 12 year old son who is new to the hobby. Even though he lives in the same house as me, he remotes in from a different room because the remote participant kept getting cross-talk from our mikes if we were in the same room. We are using roll20.net ...


1

I once had a game for DnD 3.5 that was entirely remote - it was run in Facebook comments. Several things the DM did to manage the situation: Each situation was a new post. When a new situation arose (new area, meeting a new NPC, start/end of a conflict) a new post was posted. The DM managed all the rolls. To avoid player cheating, the DM was the one that ...



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