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Problems with the character There are no problems with strong combat character builds or player's knowledge of rules. 1) Strong build: while it is possible to make laughably ineffective characters, it is hard to to make a perfect one. Even most combat effective juggernauts have some weaknesses. Let character shine for this session and then study your ...


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Assuming some of these friends of your friend do not have any roleplaying experience... I start with a "Don't Panic" notice, explaining not to worry if they don't get anything that is to follow. It will become clear after they play. I then give the definition of a cooperative game (one in which all the players work together towards a common goal). Many ...


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My explanation of RPGs to "strangers to the idea": When you watch a movie or read a book you sometimes have the idea that the personalities are behaving in a stupid way ("don't do that...!"). In an RPG you play a personality (most often a Hero) and decide its actions in a story thought up by the Storyteller/GM/DM. There are some rules about ...


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Some initial explanation is needed, but not much. I have introduced several new players to RPGs, most of them have some idea of what they were getting into, but not always, my basic intro speech is something like: "This is a role playing game, which means you will be playing a single character in a world, I am the Game Master, which means I am essentially ...


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How to explain D&D to new players? I like easy questions: don't. Set up a session where you can show them the concepts and be explicit about what you are doing: This is a short session to show you what D&D is like, to see if you like it and want to play more. We will have four encounters and to make it easy for you I'm going to tell you now ...


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Don't explain, just play. ExTSR's shock treatment for a "rules light" approach to D&D is explained here. I've used it without knowing what it was, and it works. The play's the thing. As told by Rob Kuntz and others who first began playing with Gary Gygax in the game's formative years, it was common to have very few rules, and a group of players ...


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Play balance is the constant bugbear of game mastering. I try to let my players know if there's a problem, but it's always hard to take away a shiny thing you've given them. In your specific case, 5e has a very good mechanic to apply. If you want to retroactively change the item so that the character with the lower skill gets a significant boost, yet the ...


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I'm just gonna say it. Remove him from the group. Usually that's the last resort answer. These types of games are social ones, and social problems do arise. It's important to try to work them out. It sounds like you have tried though. From what you have said, he's fine as long as he gets his way. It's when he doesn't get his way that these negative things ...


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I think that in writing out the question, you've already taken us halfway to the answer. Let's rearrange the info you gave us in roughly chronological order: He's an experienced player, and usually plays in games that don't really challenge him or his characters. In those games, he's fine and doesn't argue with the GM. You, as his little brother, invite ...


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Looks like your brother might be a munchkin. I don't want to be pessimistic, but if it is true, then you have a great problem which unfortunately may be never solved. Goddamn it! You are the Game Master! You must point him out that you are the Game Master of campaign, not him. You are the one creator of this world. He is just a player and should act like ...


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Pre-warning - I have little experience as a DM dealing with difficult players, but I'm getting pretty used to dealing with difficult tables in general. A couple of things we found really handy for our horde of uncooperative players: Talk it out / Remind him You said in the comments that: I have talked to him about it before. He seems understanding ...


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I can't read the answers as I am currently playing (very slowly) the starter game lost mines, and I spotted some spoilers so sorry if i repeat people. If there is someone they really need to talk to, describe them in a little more detail, make them someone of note. Make a joke "remember this isn't a computer game the people don't have question marks over ...


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Depending on the system at hand, it's likely to be possible to run the game without the players interacting with the rules at all. Most RPGs work perfectly well with the players conveying their intent to the GM in natural language, the GM handling the required mechanics, and then using natural language to respond, all with the players needing no knowledge ...


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First off, don't worry, I think every other novice group starts out much as you describe. The quick answer is, just "find the fun." Teach as much of the rules as you like, until you or somebody gets tired of it. Some players will be happy for you to read the rules to them, especially if you're good at reading out loud. Others will get sick of it quickly. ...


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When you introduce new players to a new game (even if those players are experienced with other games), I have been using a few rules, that from the last 15 years I've been DMing, has been proved successful. 1) Start with pre-generated characters. This have some major advantages. First, you are sure the characters will fit in the setting, and that they will ...


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One thing I try to do when introducing new players is the following: (for context) This is based off an ability you can buy in the Nobilis RPG for your Imperator (read: Patron God). Basically, your Imperator is so "in tune" with the universe, you get a weird "should I do that?" feeling before doing something dangerous/risky/stupid. NOTE: this doesn't stop ...


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Play the setting you want, but use SimpleD6, Crab Truckers, or some other simplified generalized ruleset.


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For new players, stick to the basics Character creation: if they are new, coach them through it but focus on creation and their idea rather than optimization. If they have played before, all they need is the basics for a given game. All you need to offer is any limits you have. Lore: let it unfold as the game goes on. Very basic lore about where they ...


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Game Expectations At it's core, this might be a question about different gaming styles and expectations for what a game is like. I've played at entire tables full of people who had never read a core rule book, and never would - that doesn't appeal to them. While you are interested in reading a rule book and diving into the game's mechanics and lists of ...


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I'm mostly familiar with D&D 5e, so most of my references will be to that game. The principles should be the same though. If your players don't care about the rules, maybe try running lose with the rules. Rules exist in any game to keep it fun for everyone, so strike a balance between "Rules Lawyer" and "I don't care, do whatever you want." For ...


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Answers in order followed by some discussion: Out the gate you don't need to teach them anything. As they encounter things that require rules, you inform them of them. So when they first want to try scaling a wall you inform them of how skill checks work and have them roll. You introduce the rules of combat piece by piece. Just ask them what they want to ...


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I will give you just one method that will work for any issue where you need to give information to your players: Use handouts. It may seem silly at first, but that's what I do when I go to events in my town and want to try a new system, which, obviously, nobody know the rules. When it's not a game that comes with a beginner box of some sort (such as ...



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