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Have you considered that exploration is not their thing, just your thing and you are trying to force it upon them? In any case the best approach, as is always in TTRPG's is to communicate with all of the involved. Start by asking what they expect from your game, after having listened to them explain your view. Then discuss any differences, like are they open ...


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I have refereed the Lost Mine of Phandelver twice. The essential trick is to think of what you would be seeing if you were actually there and then roleplay that as the referee. Since you are presenting a situation that leads to adventure this will provide a natural way to hook into the information that the player need to proceed. There two broad ways for ...


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I would simply tell them — out of game — that a big part of the game is exploring and looking for hidden stuff, just like searching fallen foes. This holds true in any RPG, even the video game ones. One of the big differences is that in the table top RPGs you don't get anything given to you (hints or other information) unless you ask.


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Give them a reason to explore You are most likely correct that a mini-lecture on the benefits of exploring in game will not get your players to explore more (and may annoy them, as well). You telling them that exploring is a good thing will never be as good as them realizing that they need to explore on their own. But what you can do is provide ...


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Make them really excited for the new system/setting Our group was in a similar situation several times these last years. On some rare occasions it actually worked out for someone to introduce new systems and/or settings which were then very quickly picked up by other players in GM roles (if not in the very first session they still got into GMing the new ...


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Run short demo games If people are only willing to play or GM in familiar games and/or systems, try running one to three session introduction games. This will take some of the burden of off you in running a full-scale campaign for every new system you want to try, and will give them a chance to experience a "preview" of the game that might get them more ...


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I've had similar challenges, both with getting group buy-in to try new systems and with getting people to feel comfortable GMing anything at all. My solution was a long-game process of changing the "landscape" of how people at the table viewed their role in the game. I didn't set out to deliberately address the challenges you're facing, but it's ...


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You could try having them watch others play a new system. As a player this has given me a taste of how the systems work and the tone of the game. There are a few twitch channels where people play RPG's, I've watched most of ITmejp's games which include quite a few different games/styles, most of which have been posted to his youtube channel as well. I'd ask ...


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You probably can't... they seem like they're all resistant to change. If you want a plan to try even though it might not be advisable: Find a system that your group hasn't played, and one of the guys that GM'd before would be interested in. If he's a horror western buff, Deadlands. If he liked Bladerunner, Shadowrun... Something that really jibes with what ...



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