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1

I can't speak from the perspective of new to tabletop because I've been playing for 35 years; however I can speak to the experience of having small children at the game. I recently started running (and hosting) a D&D 3.5 game, and two of my players have a child just short of two years old who they bring to the game. I also have a 12-year-old, who ...


7

Another solution is play tabletop RPGs online with your friends in the evening, after your children's bedtime. This avoids problems with finding babysitters, interruptions while playing, and of course the huge disruption to your kid's bedtime routine if there are a bunch of people in your house talking & laughing. I'm a father of a 4 year old and have ...


22

I DM a 3.5 game and have a one year old. Yes, they will cause disruptions. They won't be the only things that do. Disruptions Happen The truth about "immersion" is that disruptions happen. That's the reality of tabletop gaming. They happen because the kids are running around, or they wake up, or the phone rings, or you need to pull something out of the ...


7

I will expand on this tommorow, but three things from my personal experience. Obviously it will depend on the individual children. Feel free to invite the 7 year old to play. If your child is mature enough, and depending on the relationship between the children, it's possible to have a 7 year old play a character, as well as have the younger children be ...


1

Run 5e 5e has the fastest character creation of the last 3 editions, and the smallest core rules as well. D&D Basic is available for free download, and the Starter Kit is selling around 20 dollars and is an excellent introduction to both the edition and the hobby. The adventure module inside is well written and well organized and specifically breaks ...


1

3.5e or Pathfinder 5e is new, 4e requires knowledge of game concepts from other dnd games and combat takes ages, and ADND/2e/clones are very rough on new players. My greatest strike rate with introducing DnD to new players/roleplayers who haven't played it is 3.5e. I include Pathfinder as the two games are very similar, with some people calling Pathfinder ...


2

Did the player roleplay in a way you liked during the session? This particular form of XP reward is designed primarily to act as a subtle form of positive reinforcement to 'train' the players with. The fact that it shows up in the core books of various RPGs also helps keep it from looking like putative behavior on the part of the GM. If your playing with a ...


7

I've seen this done in two ways: A) "I know good RP when I see it" The first method doesn't have any particular criteria at all. Just watch what the players do, and when you see behavior that you think is good play, reward it. The upside is that you're not boxed into what "good RP" looks like, as it can be anything where the players are engaged. The ...


12

Well, you've hit the crux of the problem for a lot of the hobby - there's a lot of different ways to have fun roleplaying, all of which can be "good", but not all of them work well together. Good roleplaying might be: Entertaining dialogue spoken in character Good narration/description of how a character does things Character defining moments of growth ...


1

A Walkthrough Run a one-shot or up to a 3 session game. Have your Newbie GM sit with you. Let the other players know that this is going to be a walkthrough. For a walkthrough, everyone at the table should be explaining the choices they're making and why they're making them, and feel free to ask questions as you go. "Ok, so notice how I'm having the ...


1

He's, theoretically, a nice guy This, I think is the heart of your problem. "Theoretically" here, means all evidence points otherwise. Expertise in rules is not reason to play with someone. This isn't like professional sports where you need an expert referee or an expert player to win games. You're here to have fun, and this person doesn't ...



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