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2

Ten things I've noticed over the years: Don't become the players' enemy! There are more of them than you. The players will miss the most obvious hints. They will equally solve your most subtle and convoluted puzzle in an instant. Do NOT let 2. and 3. bother you -- keep the story going. Try to pick up your player's pet interests, so if the action starts to ...


3

In AFMBE, as in most traditional RPGs, character death means "that character is dead and that's it. The player can generate another character now if they want." AFMBE, also like most RPGs, assume a somewhat realistic world so video gamey things like "and the new character gets the old character's gear" is not a thing. New characters don't remember things ...


0

I would suggest starting with the Player's Handbook 1, Dungeon Master's Guide 1-2, and the Monster Vault. Dungeon Master's Guide 2 should be helpful as well. Then, to give more variety in player character creation, get Player's Handbook 2 and 3. If your player's want more variety I also highly suggest Arcane Power, Divine Power, Martial Power 1-2, Primal ...


1

The question of narrative control has been answered very well: "It depends on the game and the table preferences, but the default assumption is that the GM controls these things." The question of how to say no without actually saying no has not seen a good answer, yet. (Several good ways to say yes without actually saying yes have also been presented.) ...


13

Here's a funny way to handle it: if your player can narrate surprising things onto his background, clearly you can too. PLAYER: "I ask Linene when the boss is going to deliver that diamond." DM (as Linene): "Next Tuesday at dusk. Look for a rowboat off Cutthroat Pier, tell them the black raven flies at midnight." DM (as Linene): "They'll want ...


6

A way to say 'yes', while still exerting influence: roleplay a flashback. (This is similar in approach to this answer to a question about engendering more roleplay.) DM: okay, you know Linene? Let's explore this a bit. Four minutes real-time, you set the scene. Player: uhh... okay? I was coming through here a few months ago with some illicit ...


17

The player claimed to know someone. As the DM, you can decide whether that is actually true. Consider you were out and someone you don't remember comes up to you and claims to know you. Depending on your personality you may ask, "I'm sorry, how do you know me?" Or you may play along to some extent. How is his character going to remind the bar owner, for ...


3

There are a few ways you could handle it. The NPC might have reacted like "What the hell are you talking about?" She could have played along with him, even though she didn't know him, for her own personal reasons. Maybe she had a particularly "hot" diamond that she was looking to offload and saw her chance to take advantage of the situation. She could ...


33

The term for this is "narrative control." There are several approaches to narrative control in games. Back "in the day", most games (including all varieties of D&D up till now) reserve all narrative control to the GM, with players only having say over their own character's thoughts and actions. This sounds like what you're used to, and it's the usual ...


54

It's up to you There are two play styles (with regard to this question at least), with their own drawbacks and advantages. The first is to keep the realms of the world (DM) and the player characters strictly separate. I use the term "Golden Box" to describe this. In Golden Box gameplay, the players cannot define anything about the world, including who an ...



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