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188

These people are toxic. You don't need to resist them in-game, you need to leave. He makes a point of it by calling me 'it' in real life, as, according to him, my unusual name isn't really a name and as such it isn't worth addressing me by. This is just proof that you're not going to be respected at all.


155

You have more power than you think. Set boundaries in advance, and establish the consequences for violation. Don't be afraid to walk out if harm is occurring. Discuss your concerns before game play, and test them in a limited fashion with collaborative character creation. You assert: "I'm interested in playing with this group because I'm very close to the ...


107

Don't play with people who make you uncomfortable. The fundamental issue is that the group has a couple meanie-face jerkheads (feel free to insert a much more vitriolic phrase of your choosing) who everyone else is tolerating. These players are engaging in abusive, toxic behavior. This is bad in any context. Games are supposed to be fun, and playing with ...


92

In my opinion, It's much easier NOT to think of Dungeons and Dragons as a game. There's no winner, no predefined goals, and no rules that the DM can't change. As if that weren't enough, there's no limits on what you can do during your turn (and often no turns at all)! In order to understand the appeal of Dungeons and Dragons, I find it best to throw out all ...


73

The players you have described sound horrific. D&D can be a great game, but any game could be spoiled by players like these. Avoiding the game entirely, as Rylee Fowler suggests, is the safest solution. Still, if you definitely want to play this game anyway, proceed with caution. Start by speaking to the DM about your concerns. You know your DM well, so ...


67

They did however love it and want to continue next week. I am afraid you have answered your own question. The first rule of playing RPGs (or anything) is to have fun, so just make sure you also have your share of it. Now, you are new players, so it is obvious you are going to spend time learning the system, learning how to play with each other, ...


57

What the answer comes down to is "exercise your social networks, both online and offline." You can be both looking for gamers/groups of gamers you can join and also registering your interest so that groups of gamers interested in a new player can find you. Decide what you want to do and prep your pitch Do you care what game(s) you will play, can you ...


57

Dungeons and Dragons is an example of a "tabletop" roleplaying game, and you are correct that D&D can be played very much like a board game. Your confusion comes from the fact that it isn't always played like that. (Ask 100 players 'how is it played' and you'll get 150 answers...) So I'll start with the basics. A simple description of D&D ...


54

"So, what's everyone's hobby?" John asked that evening, opening a beer. "I love gardening," Kyle said. "I'm into assassinations." Nick was apparently trying to be funny, again. Making a face even. Nobody laughed. "I play roleplaying games," Zora said. Some started chuckling about that. "No, I don't mean the leather and whips and French maids stuff you're ...


53

You're not having fun. Since the entire point of role-playing is to have fun, you need to do something about it. In particular, it sounds like the character he's playing (called a GMPC) is seriously distracting him from his GM task of running a fun story for the other players at the table. You have several options, depending on whether you're willing to ...


46

...One of them calls you 'it'? This isn't a question of how to deal with difficult people, this is a warning of a potentially dangerous antisocial person, and a big tip off that they are a miserable human being. Any observed tendency to attempt to dehumanize a person for no good reason like this - and refusing a person their rightful name is a massive, ...


44

Sigh, I think others are making this more complicated than it is and aren't answering the right question. Perhaps it will make more sense if you restate that brief blurb as: The players determine what their characters say, think, and do. The GM describes everything else in the world. You "say" what your character does, the GM "says" (aka determines) ...


43

The way I've always seen this done is to simply let everyone look over all the characters, and then let them decide among themselves who plays what. I guess this could lead to problems if there were two players who absolutely insisted on having the same character, but I've never witnessed that being an issue. More likely, one of them will just say "I ...


39

If everybody's having fun, you're fine! There is no universal answer to this except "Whatever works for your group." Some people will like it, some won't care, some will be annoyed, so you really have to tailor this sort of thing to the group you're playing with. As a GM, I encourage this kind of analysis but generally keep it to a post-mortem after the ...


37

I'm going to give you the best advice I wish I had when I first got into roleplaying - I use it to this day. Play games you like, with people you like. Vice versa - do not play games you do not like, or play with people you do not like. You may not be able to find a game right now. If you have access to Skype or Google Plus Hangouts or any kind of online ...


36

Children don't have the depth of view or span of attention that adults have. If your players are young, it's not a bad thing to railroad them a little bit. You might do this by simply "replacing" the information via some other means: an old beggar they show kindness to tells them he's heard a rumor about the gang, a respected character lovingly chides them ...


35

It’s a problem but perhaps not as bad as “ECL 5” suggests You are probably more powerful than a 1st-level character should be. You are not, however, as powerful as a 5th-level character can be, or even should be. Moreover, even as a 1st-level character, Wyrmling White Dragons have some glaring weaknesses that don’t seem appropriate. ...


32

Welcome to roleplaying! I know it can be daunting; there are literally thousands of RPGs on the market as well as out of print ones that people still play. What is roleplaying? Many a roleplaying game has a "What is roleplaying?" section in the front, and they all have different takes on it, but the most common summary is that it's a formalized version ...


32

Flat out tell them (as GM) that the best debriefing possible, after the mission has inevitably failed, is to blame the failure (likely, multiple failures) on the treasons of dead teammates who aren't there to defend themselves. Have a secret society order one PC to kill another, or to frame then kill them. If they don't do it, have their own secret society ...


32

Is she dissatisfied? Is she upset by this situation? Does she desire greater involvement, or would enjoy more if there were something different about the game? Or does she like her low level of involvement? There is no way we can answer these questions. They are questions for her. Talk to her, ask her straight out. She may be just fine with things the way ...


31

What kind of game is a roleplaying game? No matter how many times this is asked, it's always a tough one to answer. A roleplaying game is a fascinating mix between a bunch of other games and mediums you're already familiar with. At its core, roleplaying is probably most strongly linked to children's games of make-believe. Think of playing Cops and Robbers, ...


31

Read To Him You should be doing this anyway because reading to kids is good for them in general, but it's really handy here. Both to encourage reading, and by mixing in stories of adventure you can let him use his imagination and foster that type of development. Play Games With Him You're already doing this. Keep it up! Make believe games are great, as ...


31

Your situation sounds perfect for Dungeon World Dungeon World is a world of fantastic adventure. A world of magic, gods and demons, of good and evil, law and chaos. Brave heroes venture into the most dangerous corners of the land in search of gold and glory. - Dungeon World p. 7. Dungeon World relies primarily on d6s You need a handful of dice other ...


29

If you are expected to bring a character you should definitely bring that. If you're going to make a character there you should come with an idea about the following things (but remain flexible, you idea may not be exactly what you end up with). Character name Character race (Human, Dwarf, Elf, Halfling) Character archetype (loyal knight, scheming wizard, ...


29

To answer the primary point first: Sounds like you did a good GMing job, especially for a first time. The most important question is the one you answer yourself: Did your players have fun? (And the matching question, did you have fun?) If everyone's having fun then by definition you're all doing it right. With that said, some analysis of your more ...


29

Dungeons & Dragons 3.x – Too Many Traps The first tabletop RPG I played was Dungeons & Dragons 3.5ed. I recommend against 3.5 (or Paizo’s “3.75,” Pathfinder, which is really not all that different). It’s complicated and has a ton of rules, plus a lot of options that are (apparently intentionally) “traps” ...


29

As a GM, there is one thing I hate that new players do above all other things: Don't Be Afraid To Ask Questions Or Speak Up One of the things that new players do a lot is... nothing. They don't feel comfortable yet, so they don't say a lot. That's to be expected, and it's okay. But then you get the ones who won't ask questions when they're confused, won't ...


29

It is generally helpful for players to have a Player's Handbook readily available, especially for spellcasters who need to reference spell descriptions every now and then. Aside from that, the most help that it will do is speed up character generation and leveling-up, which is good at the table because it allows for more game-time in the session. I find that ...


29

NO It's not overkill, it's awesome. I just used the SPT to kick off a new group. Most (4 of 7) had never played before, and one thought that D&D was some sort of board game. We had a get-together before the first session where we just hung out and talked about media - what games, tv shows, books, etc., we liked and what kind of stuff we would want to ...


28

Dungeons and Dragons is very much a social game. As such, there is no real "by yourself" to it. The only things you can really do separate from a group in D&D is to educate yourself on the rules of the game, and prepare for whatever sessions lie ahead. Toward that end, I recommend two things primarily: Learn the rules. Study all of the ...



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