New answers tagged

2

The parallel I've drawn to the stress track for d20 games is it's fairly similar to spell slots for a Wizard- or Cleric-type character: For example, a wizard has a certain number of zeroth-, first-, and second-level spell slots. They may use a second-level slot to memorize a first-level spell, but cannot use a first-level slot and a second-level slot to ...


0

This answer is more for completeness to this issue, giving another answer which someone may find useful. As should be noted in the tone of this answer, I do not encourage the original poster to follow this. 4 Words, and an idea stolen from Blizzard Entertainment: Homebrewed Two Headed Ogre. It can be any creature which could conceivably have two heads in ...


2

Short answer is: You can't rush character creation. Long answer is: Creating a new character is out of place during a gaming session. It's unfair to the "regular" players and stressful on the GM. A new player should not be introduced to the game without a fully developed character. If the new player is a "walk-in", spur of the moment thing, then let ...


1

I regularly run groups of up to 6 and have even run 7 or 8 on occasion (I prefer to keep it to 6 or under just to make sure it's easier for everyone to have something to do). Just make sure you have an easy way to keep track of hit points etc, that you balance the encounters appropriately, and that everyone is aware the game will play more slowly due to more ...


6

Having players sharing a character something I might think a highly experienced GM might be able to hazard a middling job at handling. For a new GM, I'd have to say no freaking way. It will be much easier, and much more interesting for your players, to play one per character, even if the group was large enough to be unwieldy. I'd suggest you instead ...


11

Possibly but this is unlikely to solve your problem. The problem is that the players are the ones playing the game and no matter how you structure this there are 6 players wedged into the same amount of playing time. In theory this means that each player gets 33% less time to play than in a 4 player game, however, in practice it is much more complicated ...


35

Two players could play one character, but probably it would be too boring. They could agree all the character's action, and they could take turns when role playing him. But that would be less interesting and exciting than having one character. Also, it can lead to discussions when the two players are agreeing what to do, so the game can be even slower than ...


0

I would suggest starting with the Player's Handbook 1, Dungeon Master's Guide 1-2, and the Monster Vault. Dungeon Master's Guide 2 should be helpful as well. Then, to give more variety in player character creation, get Player's Handbook 2 and 3. If your player's want more variety I also highly suggest Arcane Power, Divine Power, Martial Power 1-2, Primal ...


-4

It doesn't take too long to create a new character if you know what you want. You could just create the character when the rest are taking a rest.


4

Is there a way to better piece together characters without leaving anything out and without taking a overly long time to do so? You see, any way this can be answered is with OUR definition of 'an overly long time' , which others may mention; is a matter of perspective. With that in mind, here are my suggestions on swift character building from my ...


6

One solution that you might want to consider is having a dozen or so generic pre-made characters on hand. The player would be able to pick one, then edit it as needed. This way you can adapt the character creation time based on how much time he has before play starts. Make sure to have the characters be fairly common, yet powerful ones, like an elven ...


36

1. Carry pre-generated characters. 2. Allow character changes after-the-fact. Pregenerated characters can save you a lot of time. It's not the ideal solution for immersive role-playing, but it'll save you what sounds like hours. Then, between sessions, allow the new player to build a character of similar level, now that they've got a taste for what they ...


2

The simplest and most obvious answer is to read the rule book. it happened to me once that I forgot to put clay in my initial inventory as a druid. I could then not cast "Stone Shape" and we decided to add it to my inventory in retrospect because it's quite a reasonable thing to have as a druid/not expensive and I just forgot to have it For example, if ...


9

Going with the very same idea of @Angelo, I'd suggest to let players try anything. If rules, though, don't let that happen you have several ways to react: Still let it happen If you are with a group of players who are not familiar with the rules, and you have not much interest in them knowing them, you can try to twist the rules some times, so they don't ...


5

I would suggest the DM should role-play the "You can't do that" situations as opposed to just saying "You can't do that". You'll find that even the most ridiculous player requests when role-played allow the story to continue and may even teach the player(s) some valuable lessons. Yes, this will be harder for a new DM to handle fluently. However, the more ...


0

Ignoring the effectiveness of the actual action taken for a moment, your real concern seems to be the player acting without any return consequences. For me, I would have handled this as a Surprise situation - have the NPC roll a Perception check vs the PC's stealth (if you hadn't already determined this in some way), and if successful, the PC gets a ...


2

The spell has no effect if the target is undead, if it doesn’t understand your language, or if your command is directly harmful to it. In the rules for the spell, it says the creature cannot hurt itself. The spell would end after casting. Also don't argue with your players. You are the DM; Your job is to describe what happens, not discuss it. Your ...


27

I agree with Dan B's first point, but let's expand upon it. The command is only a single word. "Suicide" could maybe work, though in my experience, it is rarely used as a verb . However... As Dan mentioned, the command cannot be directly or obviously harmful to the target. Thus, "Suicide" or some one-word version of "stab self" would not work. The Command ...


29

Command says: "The spell has no effect if... your command is directly harmful to the creature." Also, even if a creature wanted to kill itself, 5e doesn't have rules for doing so in one attack. It would use the same rules as for attacking helpless creatures, meaning the attack has advantage and is an automatic critical. But you can't just say "he cuts ...



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