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0

Tell them how you would expect them to solve the challenges they've failed thusfar. Tell them that when you create challenges in the game for the player characters that you create them with multiple avenues of solving available, and that everything in the game isn't restricted to them having to fight something to solve a problem. Once you tell them this ...


0

I honestly think your best chance is to write out predefined (overall) responses for your NPCs and stick to them ie you keep feeling sorry for your players!


6

Here's how I did it. Back in the day (AD&D 2e, but I don't see how it being Pathfinder is particularly relevant to an answer) I had a casual group that usually played kick-down-the-door. Well, it was the late 1990s and we had gotten wider RPG exposure and decided as a group that we wanted to play a serious, immersive, simulationist game. So I started a ...


8

Have you actually explained to the players the difference between a tabletop RPG and a computer RPG? You wouldn't try to play chess with someone without explaining how the game works which, even in chess, means knowing more than the rules. The assumptions about a FRG are incredibly greater than chess.


6

One of the best things to teach players that actions have consequences is to let them experience those consequences. It may sound harsh, but let them get in over their heads and die. Anything else and you're teaching them that their actions really DON'T have consequences, since they are avoiding them. Then, deconstruct what happened (ie. why they died), ...


2

There are a couple spells that are designed largely for this. Those being Mark of Justice, Bestow Curse and Geas/Quest. These would allow a largely temporary(if the behavior corrects itself) punishment a large organization, church or government might levy against those who break the law, or otherwise act in manners the group disapproves of. There is also ...


3

You say you're "not awful at quipping IRL". So, make a character that has your own personality. You're still not playing yourself exactly, because you don't live in the character's world or have the character's abilities. 1 1 (Unless, of course, you're playing in a present day setting, and have a rather mundane character. Or amazing abilities in real life) ...


6

There is a huge number of things that could be included in an answer to this question, but as I do not know what your general process is like as well as for the sake of brevity I will just delve into one exercise that has worked well for me. Start by deciding what kind of personality you'd like your character to express This may seem a little obvious ...


1

If you are new to roleplaying games in general or if you're not familiar with the kind of system, you can begin learning by excluding technical rules and certain mechanics with a mini one-shot explaining the very basics of the game, then including the more complex mechanics as you go. When you feel overwhelmed, switch to an official character sheet. For ...


10

For the new players I highly recommend using the character sheets provided by the game publisher. The benefits they provide are: It looks pretty and for some players might make it easier to stay in the suspension of disbelief (Warning! TV Tropes link). A new player has no idea how much information they will need to write down and how to structure their ...


2

I would always start off with the default character sheet. The benefits of doing so are the following: Everyone has information in the same place. If a player can't find something, the DM or the person sitting next to them, knows where to point. It tends to have a certain logic to the layout, maybe related concepts easier to understand. It takes less ...


1

5e is great for new players. I personally started out on 5e, with the only previous experience with D&D in general being a single session of 3.5 that ended in disaster. 5e is a very intuitive system that has a surprisingly low amount of math involved. You don't get nearly as many bonuses to your rolls as you did in previous editions, and situational ...


4

Train them You put pressure on an inexperienced player, with dire consequences for her action. This is overwhelming. Requiring players to think quick when their character needs to think quick is a perfectly good (and very immersive) thing to do, but you have to train them. Create some situations where they need to think quick, with very small consequences ...


4

I think this boils down to roughly three cases in general: We can assume the character would know something about green jellies, but the player doesn't. At this point, explain what we can assume the character knows and give the player a couple of minutes to reach a decision (maybe let other characters act while the player thinks). A relatively fast ...


62

Seperate in character quick thinking from out of character quick thinking. Players, especially new ones, should get some time to think about what they are going to do. They should even get time to talk to the DM, maybe roll dice (like knowledge checks) to determine things they know about the situation. It's not really fair to pressure the player into ...


4

Putting pressure on players can be good, if they know how to handle it. If they don't, don't pressure them. As you said for yourself, the player is an inexperienced player. This means that he/she is probably not at all familiar with what her character even can do in that situation (even though the answer to that would be "everything you can imagine, pretty ...


-1

If you feel the player has all of the information she needs to make a decision, then 5 minutes seems too long and will slow down the game. Maybe 30 seconds or a minute. When DMing inexperienced players, I would avoid severe punishments for failing to make a snap decision. Rather, offer a carrot (like extra experience points, free rerolls, or other bonuses) ...


19

Players should be aware of the consequences of the actions their characters are supposed to be taking. If the players do not know these consequences, how are they supposed to decide on which course to take? As a D&D noob myself: I have never heard of a green jelly. If someone just explained to me "A green jelly drops on you. How do you react?" I ...


14

The traditional answer to this is, "Write it down and pass a note." In the 21st century, I might change that to, "Send a text." Of course, nothing prevents your players from passing the note around amongst themselves, or reading it aloud. In some circumstances, "Take one player aside and talk to him or her." However, I think you might be asking two or ...


7

It sounds like you have a problem with players metagaming (acting on information the player has, but his character doesn't), and you're fixing that by having the players explicitly inform each other. This usually works fine as long as players don't have to do it too often – but if you're requiring them to relay the info to the group every time they ...



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