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There are really three types of knowledge in any role playing game: Player knowledge Character knowledge Game mechanics I'll cover them in more detail below, including how to cope with not having that knowledge. Player knowledge This is information that you, the player, should have, generally about the setting you are playing in, above and beyond what ...


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It all depends on the group As already was said, if people are having fun, everything is all right. Managing a campaign and remembering rules is burdensome - you can help I like to be DM. Really. But I like to weave a story most. Bookkeeping is something I do when I have to. I really like it when my players knows the rules that affect their character. If ...


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It is important for the GM to learn what he is doing differently to the rules. These decisions may make the game either harder or easier for the players. A good GM accounts for these differences to make the game balanced to the level his players find entertaining and fun.


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My current Pathfinder group is in a similar situation. Half the players are brand new to the system, and even the more advanced players (including the GM) don't always understand a rule the first time it gets used... or the first several times. Luckily, this has never caused strife in my group. Once someone discovers an error, we just resolve to get it right ...


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This can be awkward, but in my experience as long as you’re cognizant of how it can be awkward and disruptive, and make good-faith attempts to avoid disruption, a good group will welcome the contributions. The key to my experiences with this has been to establish this kind of role for myself in my group; everyone knows that A. I know what I’m ...


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It is only natural, especially in a system as complex as PF, that rules "errors"/misinterpretations will occur. As a GM I would let the previous ruling stand (going back and redoing a round seems pointless unless it is causing serious player grief) but discuss the "correct"/RAW ruling and either implement it next time or just agree to homebrew that ...


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If everybody's having fun, you're fine! There is no universal answer to this except "Whatever works for your group." Some people will like it, some won't care, some will be annoyed, so you really have to tailor this sort of thing to the group you're playing with. As a GM, I encourage this kind of analysis but generally keep it to a post-mortem after the ...


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I'd love to add some knowledge from a DW-guide by John Aergard. It's full title: Dragonslaying on a Timetable: Running Tight 4-Hour Dungeon World One-Shots With Zero Preparation. Briefly, this is what it's all about: He makes no preparation whatsoever beforehand. If you're a new GM however, you might want to read through the rulebook a few times :) He ...


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I love all the info Runeslinger has provided but I respectfully beg to differ. There is a simple answer here: No You do not need to play CoC before playing A!C. You will, however, need more than just the two core books to start. The books seem to support at least 3 systems - Fate Core, Savage Worlds, and Call of Cthulhu 6th edition. You will need to get ...


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What is needed to play or run the game? Player As a player, the Player's Guide should suffice if you are familiar with the system that your group is using. At present, Achtung! Cthulhu has versions for Call of Cthulhu and Savage Worlds (these are presented together as a dual-system set), PDQ, and Fate. If you are not familiar with the system, having access ...



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