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The game I chose is very accessible (I have even played it with my mother, grandmother and mother-in-law, and they all loved it). It can be played in very large groups effectively, but is best with groups between 10 and 20 (minimum 7). Also, you can play the game without any equipment at all, though at least a pen and a few pieces of paper will definitely ...


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FU: Freeform / Universal RPG This week I have had very good results using FU: Freeform / Universal RPG with my English-language students - the same type I described in the original question, but now some of them have had some rpg experience from my lessons. Of the games I have tried with English students (Dungeon Squad as in my other answer, and NWoD A ...


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Welcome to the Adventure!! There's a lot of good answers here, but seeing has I've only (really) started now Role-Playing, I've been "there" recentely, "where to start?" and "How to do it?", and been answering a lot to new players of my group aswell. What is role-playing!! Basically , Role-Playing (games) is like a theater play, but instead of you just ...


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My group uses a private Google+ community to organise the games, and G+ alongside Roll20 to play the games. We play entirely online on a weekly basis, mainly because we're all about the same age and have small children and families, so it's difficult to get together for a face to face game. For D&D 5th Ed you're pretty spoiled for choice, but when it ...


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I am currently playing a 5th edition game as DM but with only 2 players - a long-time D&D associate and my 12 year old son who is new to the hobby. Even though he lives in the same house as me, he remotes in from a different room because the remote participant kept getting cross-talk from our mikes if we were in the same room. We are using roll20.net ...


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I once had a game for DnD 3.5 that was entirely remote - it was run in Facebook comments. Several things the DM did to manage the situation: Each situation was a new post. When a new situation arose (new area, meeting a new NPC, start/end of a conflict) a new post was posted. The DM managed all the rolls. To avoid player cheating, the DM was the one that ...


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Based on this answer and my comment on it, someone suggested I write an answer as well. I think I'm going to go with a "monster-of-the-week" style of campaign. I think that because she likes to have closure on each story rather quickly, I can mimic TV Series as to provide players with 1 to 2 (tops) session(s)-long scenarios, using PCs as the "main cast" of ...


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If your girlfriend has trouble holding focus on a long-winding campaign, consider implementing an episodic storytelling mechanic - have each session be a continuous storyline, but also self-contained, so that they start with a premise and end with a resolution. Consider doing it 'monster-of-the-week' style, such that you can play through encountering, ...


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It sounds like you're asking "Is it possible to get people excited about something they have explicitly said they are not interested in?" Yes, it's very possible! If you want to get someone excited about something they've told you they don't like very much, the most straightforward way to do so is to make the thing you want them to like, more like a thing ...


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Talk to your players about your constraints as a GM Ultimately this is an issue where the party as a group of human individuals playing the game will need to make concessions in their play approach to the limitations of you as a human individual GMing the game. In a perfect world you'd be able to respond to their decisions instantly, allowing you to juggle ...


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Have you considered that exploration is not their thing, just your thing and you are trying to force it upon them? In any case the best approach, as is always in TTRPG's is to communicate with all of the involved. Start by asking what they expect from your game, after having listened to them explain your view. Then discuss any differences, like are they open ...


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I have refereed the Lost Mine of Phandelver twice. The essential trick is to think of what you would be seeing if you were actually there and then roleplay that as the referee. Since you are presenting a situation that leads to adventure this will provide a natural way to hook into the information that the player need to proceed. There two broad ways for ...


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I would simply tell them — out of game — that a big part of the game is exploring and looking for hidden stuff, just like searching fallen foes. This holds true in any RPG, even the video game ones. One of the big differences is that in the table top RPGs you don't get anything given to you (hints or other information) unless you ask.


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Give them a reason to explore You are most likely correct that a mini-lecture on the benefits of exploring in game will not get your players to explore more (and may annoy them, as well). You telling them that exploring is a good thing will never be as good as them realizing that they need to explore on their own. But what you can do is provide ...


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Rather than creating a whole new campaign and making a one-shot, have you considered creating characters in your bosses images and having them in as guest-PCs/NPCs? Explain that while they're there they'd be 'acting' and 'controlling' the characters, but since they're part of the environment, you'll be taking care of any complicated rules for them. Explain ...


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Newbies are having problems because they haven't seen that world yet, where ones imagination is the limit. The idea that you can be everything takes some time to get used to. They have no idea how to break that boundary or how to play as someone else. Or what is acceptable in setting you all want to play. I think that everyone I ever played with - their ...


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I'm currently GMing a group of 8 players. 3 are very experienced and know what they want but the other 5 players are barely introduced into role-playing and much less to Pathfinder. What I've been doing for the past 2 months is trying to guide them inside the story showing them their weaknesses and their necessities for basic survivavility. For example: ...



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