New answers tagged

4

I'm going to present somehwat of a frame challenge here: you might want to eliminate that initial seed of doubt about the player from your own mind. It sounds like you're already off to a worse start than you could have by simply removing your expectations of the player entirely and letting the situation unfold naturally. Simply put: he isn't a problem ...


3

For players who might not show up, or might "not be all there" during play, or who otherwise might fail to play or fail to roleplay or drop out or get kicked out, the GM can/should think in advance about what to do in those cases. Some options I have used which worked well for me include: Have the PC's character be somewhat aligned with the player's. If ...


7

Talk with your group. Very often, I find that intragroup conflicts come from expectation mismatches. If your player expects to play a free-association storytelling game, or to just hang out and occasionally improv or "hit it with my axe!", his narcoleptic wizard and altered consciousness are appropriate and good. If you expect Tolkein-style storytelling ...


1

DMing is a role unlike any other. Show them what it entails as you show them the rules, then see if any of your friends are up for it. Your first session - or two or three - is going to be dominated by rules questions. There will be very little chance to develop anything more than the simplest of plots. Creativity, in fact, would probably be a bad thing -...


0

I recommend you not to create pre-gen character, because it will be counterproductive. When you give to a player a character sheet, you don't give him exactly what is on your mind, you just give him clues on how to play the character. That is a good thing, otherwise the game would be pretty boring, but it means also that the way the PC will act will not be ...


6

I would recommend you to to monitor the creation of PCs while discussing the choices taken by the players and explaining the expectations of the game. Try to explain issues instead of simply barring anything that you see as possibly problematic. Overall, the effect you want is not "urgh, that nasty GM told me I couldn't play a pacifist barbarian half-drow, ...


3

This is going to be all about how you present the issue to your players. Presenting interdictions and constraints will be frustrating for all players, both new and experimented. Instead, provide guidelines to character creation, focus on what you player can be rather than what they can't be. This will allow for more consistency among the party (and may be ...


4

As a player, you can talk before the game to your DM and mention your desires and concerns so he knows where you're coming from. You may also learn how he intends to approach things, and you can ask him if there are ways you can help support him in keeping things running smoothly, etc. As a DM, there are endless ways to affect the atmosphere of a group, and ...


8

Before the game Make sure you are all on the same page before that game start. Explain that you want to play a serious game with lots of immersion. State that you are both willing to help others with immersion and lead by example. This is best done before the game starts. If not all players agree, then you might want to rethink join said game. As a side ...


10

You are all out for a good time. My idea of a good time often involves watching rugby league; my idea of a bad time involves watching motorsport. How can that be? Aren't they both sports? Sometimes, in order to spend quality time together with friends, I watch motorsports. And they, being good friends, might watch rugby league even if it is not their ...


2

The key to role-playing a character is in two parts which both come from the theatre: Acting & Writing ACTING: You have already mentioned the first part when you say "I don't find it interesting to invent some "artificial" character, with no real connection with me" which is a problem I sometimes call buy-in. If you cannot connect to your character, ...


2

Personally, whenever I want to play a character that isn't just 'me, but a ranger' I'll think back to books I've read, pick an interesting, well fleshed out character from a book, and then mold them for the setting. This works best if the character has been well fleshed out, and even better if the book's been written in such a way to reveal their inner ...


2

I used to keep a small note file of my character's quirks, history, and personality traits on hand while role playing characters much different from myself, and then I would review it regularly as the game moved forward so that I could remind myself often - almost like a set of 'what would [my guy] do?' instructions. Like others said - there's nothing wrong ...


2

It's the same for me. Much like video games, I have issues with playing a game through in particular ways. I have issues playing as a woman (not being sexist - just as a guy, to me it feels weird); and a lot of the time I struggle sticking with an "evil" character. So in RP, I tend to create characters that fit my personality - Neutral good, always male, ...


1

When I first started playing I had no idea what to expect so I just did what I thought was right at the time. As that progressed I got to know my character and was able to play him more. I didn't get round the writing my back story until I'd levelled up the first time. I write stories myself so when I wrote my characters back story I strung together ideas ...


2

On the simplest level, filter your reactions and decisions through the viewpoint of your class, alignment or race (for a typical FRPG, flavor for other systems). An elf would react to a bar fight very differently than a half orc, or a fighter very differently than a warlock. Don't fall into the "My Guy wouldn't do that" trap, though. Use the viewpoint to ...


2

I think it's normal, at the begining I always made the same characters, usually wizards or if I was feeling lucky some ranger. After a while this gets old, and you get bored of playing always the same characters, so I started playing deeply flawed characters, even if it means my character would die after a few sesions (because my alignment was opposite to ...


0

Another option is a nice Dice-Box, with a separate labelled pocket for every dice. You can put it one the table, it can look really nice (with leather and nice fabric) and you can put each die in its own place. After rolling you can keep the die you rolled on the table and put it back if you need another die.


4

What would Jesus do? Or rather what would a hybrid of Valmont and Arsène Lupin do? Clearly, their reaction to some stimuli should be very different from yours. This is a trick I use all the time as GM and player: pick two, or more characters from fiction (books either fictional or historical, movies, plays, TV series) and mash them together. Add a dose of ...


5

Don't try to be creative on demand Don't try to conceive of your next character holding dice in front of a blank character sheet. Consider it while (or after) reading a book or watching a show or movie, reading the news, or going about your life. The Mysterious Elf Generator Some RPG players play the same character with different names, over and over. ...


16

That's okay. I've played in a lot of games and I don't usually roleplay much either. The most important advice I have for beginning roleplayers is to roleplay someone who isn't annoying. Too many people decide to roleplay a thief, or a racist, or a bully. If the other characters don't like having you in the group, the players probably won't like having you ...


8

I can't make any claims as to what is normal or not, but I can say I have observed other players who tend to "role-play themselves" or to role-play very similar characters who are not themselves, so it seems not uncommon. I can also say that as the years have gone by, I have found myself creating and playing characters farther and farther away from my own ...


23

I think that feeling is perfectly normal and probably pretty common with new players. For some, it may be a comfort issue, where they aren't comfortable acting not like themselves and for others, it may be an interest issue, where they have no desire to roleplay. Now here is the thing, you don't have to roleplay every variation nor do you have to roleplay at ...


0

At the start of your session, encourage those players that don't yet have the dice memorized to take a few moments to lay one of each die on the table, turn each to its highest value (the d10 should be turned to the 0 but still treated as a ten for the next step), then place the dice in ascending order in a spot designated for dice not being actively used. ...


11

Give them a playmat with pictures and labels of each die, plus other important info for the game system The most effective way I have found is to give them a playmat which has both a picture of each die and a space for it. Savage Worlds has a popular fan made playmat that has a picture of each die and a space for where it goes (along with other important ...


0

I know in DND, throwing dice around is a ritual but I generally don't let my players to roll their dices. I roll for them, thus no need for them to hunt for the die they need. Saves time and a lot of trouble if there are players tempted to cheat around. Another plus side: you might use your mobile phone to roll the dice without killing the immersion.


3

Keep them in one of those compartmentalised trays (the kind you get dips and snacks in). Use labelled cups, beakers etc. If you're artistic, you could even draw pictures on them.


3

These techniques have work for me both with younger kids and casual gamers: Use a sample set Matching shapes is easy. Remembering stuff is hard. Set up a set of dice in front of you. Point at the die when you refer to the type of die/dice they need to roll. Positive thinking Encourage the players to arrange their dice with the highest numbers up. Then ...


10

There really should not be any reason for anybody to feel ashamed of picking up the wrong die. We all had to learn to tell which was which, and it didn't happen immediately. You wouldn't feel ashamed of, say, not being able to distinguish orthoclase from plagioclase, or a reed warbler from a nightingale, would you? At least not if you weren't already an ...


6

When I introduce new players to the game, I place all the dice on the table onto a piece of paper with labelled areas for each dice size, so that when they need a die they can take it from the appropriate area. I ask them to replace the dice to the correct place in the dice pool, so they get used to recognising the dice as they use them.


2

Positive reinforcement Nothing to add to the answers advising you to take your time besides: Reward them when they pick the correct dice on the first try (with chocolates, small xp or whatever). Ok, this might actually sound pretty dumb, but positive reinforcement has been proven to increase efficiency in learning. Might be worth giving a try. (As long as ...


4

use a cheat sheet while learning Take a picture of each polyhedron, create a document that shows the value count next to them and maybe their most frequent uses, then bring a print for each of your players. Combine this with colored dice and your players will have an easier time learning the different dice.


4

Though you have already tried it in a way, I still would like to contribute what I believe is the easiest way to get started: If you just mention the color that they need to roll, it is very easy for players to pick the right one. EXAMPLE Please roll the red D20 Though I have not actually used this in a D&D setting, I used it in various ...


19

This answer is absolutely right in saying that the best solution is to get practice and experience with dice in play. So let's power-level your players' dice XP! Take a session or two to play a game that forces frequent interaction with all the polyhedrons at once rather than one a time. Games which put emphasis on picking up multiple different-shaped dice ...


8

Partial answer: The only technique I've used that hasn't been mentioned in the question or in other answers is placing the largest number pointing up after I've finished using a die. It's slightly less tedious than keeping all dice in order (although I've done that for some games), but it does still take player overhead. (It also feeds into the common ...


72

Short answer: really, practice is the only answer It's like any kind of memorization task, eventually you're going to get it, and you'll have trouble until then. But there are ways to make the memorization easier. You are going to have to correct them sometimes. Don't think of that as a failure. Just make the correction and move on. Don't default to ...


13

Most of the time players will need only two dice: A d20 and the damage die for their weapon. Instead of handing the new players a full set, give them just these two and introduce them to the other dice when they need to roll them.


5

You get one free item interaction per turn, which includes drawing a weapon. Player's Handbook (PH) page 190 (or the free Player's Basic Rules, page 70): You can also interact with one object or feature of the environment for free, during either your move or your action. For example. you could open a door during your move as you stride toward a foe, ar ...



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