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Personally as a DM I love the occasional unexpected response from the players and welcome the potential fallout from these actions. There should certainly be consequences and as mentioned in other answers; these situations offer great hooks for future development in the game world. In addition to feeling the impact of the guards' deaths, there are other ...


0

In the spells description it says that the image can be up to four ten foot squares, plus one more for each spell caster level the spells user has. The 'room' produced is a visual illusion that tricks certain senses as described; sound, smell and temperature. This is where the DM comes in as it doesn't mention affecting lighting (this also means depending ...


1

It seems that your question has 2 (related) sub questions: Are the characters behaving to their alignment? See How do you adjudicate what alignment a PC's actions are? for answers to this. What consequences should follow from their actions? See My PCs have a plan that will get them all killed; how and why should I save them? for answers to that.


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From a strictly rules-as-written standpoint, this doesn't appear to work. Major image has no provision or ability to block line of effect, so deeper darkness would still prevail in the area… even though it does block line of sight, so the darkness outside the "room" would not be visible, the spell creates darkness everywhere line of effect allows it to. ...


1

There should always be consequences. If there aren't then your world will feel lifeless. Next time the PCs are captured, they are gagged and hobbled. One of the guards says, "We had an escape a few months ago, killed several guards. Since then we've updated our security."


3

The consequences of such actions, whether projected onto the characters themselves or just the world around them, should have effect. They arranged for the death of 8 people. If you want to instill a sense of what happens when you kill an 'NPC', you could present a guard's wife in the street begging for money because she has nothing left. Perhaps she is ...


0

This is trivial - they did something which logically has in-game consequences, so the DM plays those out, same as any other action. I think what you're really asking is "I don't want to bother with the results of this, is it okay to ignore it and get on with what I want to do?" The answer to that is, yes. It is a sort of reverse railroad, but if you have a ...


-3

I have read all the posts. and I gotta tell you. Letting them live is a mistake. They need to learn that walking down the street and throwing a fireball in to the bar (i know they did not do "that") Has undesired results. a re-roll of characters causes these got captured, tried and beheaded.. tends to remind players.. oh we are the good guys.


19

I can think of several ways to handle this, not all of which (due to timing) are really relevant for your situation. 1) Pre-game discussion, set-up, expectations I notice that even though you say the PCs were imprisoned by the civilian authorities, you don't say why and we (and possibly the players) know nothing about the world you've set up. Did the PCs ...


10

Some of this depends on how you prefer to define 'good' in your game world. In books and movies, it is very common to treat anyone working for the bad guys as bad, and therefore deserving of any horrific fate that the good guys find expedient. Nobody worries about storm troopers having families, despite the overall Star Wars story being all about ambiguity ...


2

some mix of the two with a blunted response and a minor story arc Sounds like the best choice to me, because they are still learning the ropes, and might have made different choices with more information. A story arc that brings the players up to speed with the alignment system and the moral nuances of the campaign you're running not just fairer, but ...


40

Han Solo, Robin Hood, and the three Musketeers: all would be stereotypical Chaotic Good characters. And none would have a second thought about dispatching their prison guards, whether it's Stormtroopers, the sheriff's men, or a guard in the Bastille. So the first question would be: did they really act out of character? What would you have expected them to ...


1

Next to the useful tricks / methods to advice them to learn, here is a highly uncommon approach. Don't do it. If they want to play a game, where they don't know the rules, it is not a problem. You know the rules, and it is enough - although it is a highly different game style. On its most extrem approach, you don't give them even their character sheets. ...


6

"We'll wait while you figure it out." It doesn't have to be your job to do all the rules for everyone and make them all custom character sheets and whatnot. You're not their boss, teacher, or mom, you're their DM. When the time comes up in game and they don't know what their HD is, tell them "look it up." Let other players help them, but there is not a ...


0

Don't. Tell them what dice to roll and ask what the result was (in human terms - "you hut him bad but he's still coming", not "You did 8hp but he's got 4 left") when you need to. The books are there to start you off; if they're not helping then either eject them or work around them, don't force them on the players. If you feel that you have to have players ...


10

Interest creates learning. Sounds like some players are playing classes they are not interested in. The paladin should be a wizard (can still be lawful good alignment if that is why they are a paladin), then casting every turn could become easier to find something useful and possibly more exciting for the player. Your cleric player would be happier as a ...


4

Eliminate the Game's Abstraction A RPG is a game where the player takes on the role of a character and makes decisions as if they were the character. In order to make things fair and balanced, the game rules impose limitations, but a character isn't aware of these limitations in mathematical terms, just like your players aren't (usually) aware of the same ...


1

In addition to getting reference materials into your players' hands, I recommend the following. Encourage Cooperation If you're the one reminding players what to do, they might start to feel like you're playing for them. From your last paragraph, it sounds like part of what you're experiencing is push-back for trying to get them to play the way you want ...


6

9 sessions in 5 month is one session every other week in average. That's an awful lot of time to forget everything they've learned over and over again. I think your problem is specific not only to RPG but to didactics in general. So in addition to the cheat sheets I'd propose a sort of "bootcamp": A weekend with at least two almost day long sessions in a row ...


17

The Critique For all of us D&D 5 is a new system; for you and your group it is a whole new concept. Some of the things that you say are basic are not so basic - I have been playing for 30+ years and I wouldn't know my attack bonus or the modifier for a Dex of 15 without looking them up on my character sheet. Have a look at the questions on this site - ...


44

1. Get a cheatsheet into each player's hands. You know that godsend player, the one who always has the notecards? Key thing there: the notecards. You've spoken to the group, and they got upset, but you know they cared enough to get the books in the first place. It's entirely possible that they do just forget, or maybe they're having a difficult time with ...


5

Do Not Pre-Make a Character Assuming you are running Fate Core, FAE, Diaspora, Dresden Files, Spirit of the Century, or any Fate variant that I know of, you should not do this. You are depriving Z, the other players, and your game of the spontaneous, synthetic, synergistic effects of creating characters in conjunction with one another. In Fate, character ...



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