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35

Yes, player characters can cast their spells at any time unless something explicitly prevents them from doing so. Players can cast spells any time they want as long as it's their turn, they have a spell slot available (if the spell needs one; most non-cantrip spells do), and they can provide the verbal, somatic, and/or material requirements. This does, in ...


10

Yes, such games exist. There are many, actually! I've personally played at least two or three systems that match your description. Among the thousands of RPGs out there, a good handful of them use no randomisation, or use randomisation other than dice (like drawing cards from a deck or tokens from a pouch). Many, many RPGs --diced or not-- don't use ...


7

Just use combat rounds This battle is against time. Have characters roll initiative and proceed in order, describing their actions according to the chart Actions in Combat. It's perfectly acceptable to explain to the players beforehand that this is not a combat encounter and that you're using combat mechanics to simulate a ticking clock, especially if ...


6

An answer to this question was posted on the Pokemon Tabletop adventures board by a user named Domo. Based on what he's said, the main problems for the GM lies in the uselessness of Status effects because of the trainers actions, with only Burn or Poison remaining as an effective tool for the GM to combat Trainer interference with. He also goes into action ...


5

Yes, games like that exist. There are many of them. You may wonder how such a game works, and how it differs from freeform improvisational collaborative storytelling. To that end, I offer a modern, exemplary game of the type you are describing: Hillfolk The game system that drives Hillfolk is called the DramaSystem, by noted designer Robin D. Laws, and ...


2

Space Combat is still a combat encounter using Characteristic and Skill Tests -- just on a different playing field. The initiative is different and the question "what action do I take?" is brought to the foreground, but the core rules of how they are performed remains the same. During this combat, the character's personal characteristics are still being ...


1

Short answer: Nothing After a read-through of the rules, it appears that there really isn't anything that needs to be done to run Pokemon Tabletop United in a closer-to-the-games style. Simply don't use any of the rules that pertain to a trainer's involvement in battles. This is backed up in the 1.05 Core PDF on page 7: If you’re wanting to play a ...



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