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37

Yes, player characters can cast their spells at any time unless something explicitly prevents them from doing so. Players can cast spells any time they want as long as it's their turn, they have a spell slot available (if the spell needs one; most non-cantrip spells do), and they can provide the verbal, somatic, and/or material requirements. This does, in ...


13

The DMG gives you several alternate XP/leveling options on pages 260-261. You may benefit from "milestone" leveling rather than doling out XP per encounter. Thus characters level up when they accomplish story specific events, so the exact path they take isn't dependent on being murder hobos. You can also get rid of XP altogether and just level characters up ...


10

Yes, such games exist. There are many, actually! I've personally played at least two or three systems that match your description. Among the thousands of RPGs out there, a good handful of them use no randomisation, or use randomisation other than dice (like drawing cards from a deck or tokens from a pouch). Many, many RPGs --diced or not-- don't use ...


7

You can also award XP based on how important the non combat event was toward progressing the general adventure. A technique I have found to work fairly well is to take the party's average level as a base CR. Tiny inconsequential events (ex: talking to a shopkeeper in character) are worth CR minus 2 as an experience award. Moderate events (ex: finding an ...


7

Similar to how you can take an action outside of combat, you can also take bonus actions (assuming of course, they are available). There are some noteworthy exceptions, specifically that if the bonus action has requirements they must be met. For instance, you could only parry if someone was attacking you. If you were casting a spell as a bonus action you ...


7

An answer to this question was posted on the Pokemon Tabletop adventures board by a user named Domo. Based on what he's said, the main problems for the GM lies in the uselessness of Status effects because of the trainers actions, with only Burn or Poison remaining as an effective tool for the GM to combat Trainer interference with. He also goes into action ...


5

Yes, games like that exist. There are many of them. You may wonder how such a game works, and how it differs from freeform improvisational collaborative storytelling. To that end, I offer a modern, exemplary game of the type you are describing: Hillfolk The game system that drives Hillfolk is called the DramaSystem, by noted designer Robin D. Laws, and ...


2

The best answer is not in FATE, but in a Gumshoe game! Gumshoe is a tabletop roleplaying game designed with the focus on investigation; finding out whodunit in a Gumshoe campaign is given more or less the same attention as how you go about stabbing goblins is given in a D&D game, and I've found it's wonderful at letting mysteries unravel. The idea I ...


2

Talk to your DM Ultimately, your DM is the one designing encounters, so he/she needs to know that you're playing a non-combat focused character. Your DM can ease back on the encounters if necessary and provide options for your character to do what he does best out of combat. You should also find out if the type of campaign your DM is running is appropriate ...


1

I play RoleMaster but the idea of XP is similar. The answer is in the word. I give experience points for relevant experiences. I dole them out (in order) by: Milestones: Accomplishing a mission or reaching a certain plateau New experiences: first time ever in town, picking a lock, meeting an owlbear, etc. (2nd time in a town, not such a big deal), ...


1

I will answer this on a generic level, as I have not gm'd a dnd game yet, so keep that in mind and fill in appropriate game system constructs for yourself. In general, I dont feel like its a good idea to hand out experience points on a per enemy or interaction level. In other systems, particularly TDE, I will hand out the same experience points for everyone ...


1

Unwritten features a skill action and complementary scene mechanic which I suggest you use for scenes and montages of investigation: Discover and Investigation. Together they combine to give structure to the process of uncovering secrets the GM has created. At its simplest, the Discover action is usable with any context-appropriate skill (often Notice or ...


1

Short answer: Nothing After a read-through of the rules, it appears that there really isn't anything that needs to be done to run Pokemon Tabletop United in a closer-to-the-games style. Simply don't use any of the rules that pertain to a trainer's involvement in battles. This is backed up in the 1.05 Core PDF on page 7: If you’re wanting to play a ...



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