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19

Execution is Key This is a cliche because a lot of stories do it. A lot of stories do it because done well, it can add something to the story. Done poorly, it just becomes silly and makes the players feel like they don't really have any impact on what's going on. So, think carefully about what you intend to use her for before bringing her back. Don't do it ...


14

As described, I don't think your character actually meets the definition of a GMPC. [The GMPC] starts out an important NPC to travel with the party and fill any missing roles no one else wants to play. It's almost like the GM has a Player Character of his own, thus this concept has come to be known as the GMPC. (emphasis mine) The character you have ...


10

Since this is a Savage Worlds question, it seems best to take into account what the book has to say (from the GM section on Extras): Though it’s rarely written, most games assume that the Game Master controls the nonplayer characters, both when they’re being talked to and when they fight alongside the player characters in combat. Most of the time, ...


8

I don't personally think there's anything inherently wrong with an invincible, super powered NPC, provided that the limelight remains clearly centered on the PCs. The players want to feel like the heroes of the story, and any time you introduce a non-malevolent being who is significantly stronger than they, there's a chance that this feeling gets squashed. ...


7

Since you tagged that as system agnostic, I will go for an answer that might not satisfy those who plays D&D/Pathfinder and closely stick to the rules. Also, I have seen many GMPC and most of the time things went very bad for the PCs, only the GM enjoyed himself and he was unable to understand players frustration. I will try to make you avoid that ...


7

I find this question somewhat difficult to answer because you're essentially saying you want to introduce a god-like character as your personal avatar into the game. My personal recommendation is to detach from the character personally. I have been in several games where the GM in question (even myself for small tables) has said up front "this is my ...


4

I, like you, am guilty of this. I have different ways to handling it, some are combinable, but not all. The main purpose of all of this is to make the game more enjoyable to your players, because the problem with GMPCs is that it tends to ruin the fun for the players. So you have to ask yourself (and/or your players) what specifics are to be avoided. I had ...


4

First and foremost, I'll assume that your game world does not have either cyberbrains, or re-sleeving or download your brain into machines. Otherwise, clearly you have conquered death and "killing" is not a crash with some data lose. With that in mind... Yes, it is a terrible idea! You cannot (should not?) relive the past. She was a great villain with a ...


4

Having done this myself, yes on all counts: it makes their control of the NPCs much simpler, and it dehumanises them significantly when they become fungible bags of dice. If you're playing using a grid always or often, that exacerbates the latter. (I can't comment from experience on fudging rolls for NPC allies because I avoid fudging rolls myself, but it's ...


3

You might do it if you (your own words) "spend some time building up" the reasons how she managed to came back to life: some distant unsure clue that the character investigate upon, at first without realising what happened, then disbelieving knowing she's dead, finally realising she really came back and wondering how and why. I.e. you may do it, but it ...


3

You seem to be describing something with a similar impact to Q from Star Trek (and similar smugness). The players can enjoy this fine, provided they appreciate that their characters are supposed to be alternately terrified, bemused, and frustrated by his actions and by his excessive powers. To avoid the players being too terrified, bemused, or frustrated ...


2

While I mostly agree with the other sentiments expressed here, you need to be very careful about how often and in what ways you present the character. Be sure to take a cue from your players as well. For example, having Elminster (or Fizban) show up in your Forgotten Realms (or Dragonlance) campaign can be fun at first but the more often they show up to ...


2

Best way I could picture the GMPC as a working concept is as "the tutorial guy" in some video games. He's inexplicably unkillable until the plot calls for it, he knows the weaknesses of nearly everything in the game world but never actually fights anything, and for the most part his purpose is more to help advance the story missions in ways the players ...


2

I've found there's exactly one criteria for whether an NPC becomes a problematic GMPC or not. Do the PCs have a say in whether or not this character is a party member? If you're imposing your own character into the party and the players don't want him there, he's a GMPC and potentially a bad one. If he's someone they want to be a part of the group, he's ...


2

This is an addendum to the existing, perfectly good answers, but I wanted to point out a crucial fact: You ARE allowed to say no. Remember, you're playing the game too. If you're feeling overwhelmed and overworked, it's totally fine to go with a path of lesser resistance. The improv rule about not saying "no" is meant to stop you from shutting down the game, ...


2

This is highly dependent on the "How?". It's often cringe-worthy if it's a Deus Ex Machina type deal, but it can be very good if it is setup in advance. Maybe there are rumors about a cult trying to reincarnate their god, or rumors about dreadful medical experiments. These are mixed with some conspiracy-theorists making unfounded claims, or people claimed ...


1

Bringing back old villains - or really, anything - is a really great mechanism, you just need to be careful about how you do it - the key is foreshadowing. In non-rp writing circles, there's an explicitly stated concept called "Conservation of Background Detail." It works just the same in RP planning as it does there. If a detail isn't important (or a red ...


1

It all depends on the world. Revolving doors world If your players expect their characters can be resurrected if killed, if your world indeed have revolving door of the afterlife, then yes, Big Bad Evil Guy can do it, too. If she was not a total idiot, she probably placed some safeguards to make sure that, if killed, she will not stay dead. If party was ...


1

I would avoid bringing her back. Some players might become unhappy that their efforts to put her down in the first place have been rendered useless and foster a sense of pointlessness to their actions. Some players may also think that you're running of original ideas. I always find that to keep games fresh and interesting you need to keep adding a certain ...


1

The simple answer is no. The more complicated answer is that it depends. My personal feelings on the subject are that too many mechanical details break immersion for players. If this isn't a role-play heavy group, then you may want to ignore my answer. I tend to operate my games the same way largely independent of the system, and in general I strongly ...



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