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0

Beware... There is a decent chance that a player has thought "hey, aren't kobolds always evil ?' and suspended its disbelief (because the NPC is giving them quests, because you changed a lot about the social order of kobolds, because it is 'PC' to change 'always evil' to 'neutral' ...) I am not quite sure that there is a way for you to hint the fact that ...


0

Maybe the duke they are introduced to is not the duke. Perhaps it a son or advisor in his stead that actually has no power to make agreements. This fact is withheld until their successful return. Or at the very least, the duke is murdered while they are away and all agreements he made are null and void under the new ruler. No lying required, if that is ...


5

Depends on the dirty work. And it depends on the players. But a tactic that comes to mind is the following: Make the kobold duke a jerkwad. Refuse to pay money. Order them out. Do something unlikeable. If they're good at taking story bait and generally have a soft heart, I'd probably toss out a kobold who seems half decent and have the duke dead-set on ...


20

Firstly, it sounds as though your players are doing a lot of the heavy lifting for you in that they are being very easily manipulated without much effort on your part at all. But let's talk about manipulation. Pa-pa-pa-poker face Manipulation relies on getting people to do something without them knowing exactly why you want them to do it, or even that you ...


4

Read up on real life evil rulers such as Lenin, Stalin, Hitler, Ad Amin, Haile Selassie I, Pol Pot, Gaddafi... The list is sadly almost endless. Any one of them would make a fine model for an evil ruler. Ryszard Kapuscinski's Shah of Shahs and The Emperor: Downfall of an Autocrat are two fine books about two autocrats, how their control worked, and ...


4

Only using the negative qualities in the core book, if you're desperate for a mechanical explanation, I would say that the character would have a Severe "Allergy" to Stress. Anything the GM would say gets the heart pumping causes 1 damage every round until she calms down or takes her pills. Social "attacks" could be seen as weapons, therefore a damage ...


3

Don't model your NPCs like PCs D&D, in all editions, is remarkably bad at modeling people who are not adventurers, but are still skilled in their fields. The normal advancement systems that each edition of D&D uses tie combat skill and non-combat skill together in a way that prevents low-level characters from using skills at a high level of ...


13

Devil's Advocate Answer: Treat this as a high DC ability/skill check, not an opposed check. For all intents and purposes, it is simply much easier to set DC checks by the handy guide reference (in PHB, p. 174) and then have the party/PCs try to make that check, rather than spend the time and effort to workup NPC skills and then spend more time doing ...


2

The first thing to do is look at the overall objective of how powerful you want the character to be in combat. Worry about their skill later. The noble would likely be a level 1 character at most, so where can he get higher level skills from? The blacksmith may have some experience, due to a lot of training with the gear he uses to ensure it stands up to ...


8

There is no guideline for this. D&D doesn't contain the idea of spending years in training to improve, and lacking any such training rules there's no way to guesstimate the power of a character based on their years of experience in a given role. You really don't need a guideline for this, anyway. D&D hands the DM the job of determining non-player ...



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