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3

It sounds like you would like insight into small unit tactics (team, squad, platoon). One book I recommend is 'The Bear Went Over the Mountain' (link limit, this is on Amazon), it discusses Soviet combat tactics in Afghanistan. This book is a series of stories about specific encounters that reveal tactical successes and failures of the Soviet Red Army ...


2

While you have received great answers which work in real life, remember that this is still a game. I don't know much about Shadowrun, I presume it is still turn based (without opportunity fire and stuff) and characters have loads of HPs and are therefore fairly confident of charging someone even if that means taking few bullets. If you are tight on time, ...


3

As a former sailor, I will offer that military personnel, ideally, know which one of a set of roles they are filling at the moment. It's a system of abstraction designed to simplify decision making when complex, fast moving situations arise. Each person knows several roles, and each role has a scope that it concerns itself with. For instance - sniper teams ...


3

The military calls for balance. It's strange but its true. On one hand, the military needs people who can lay down their life for a greater good. On the other hand, one cannot squander trained soldiers, human lives. Combat teaches you to balance things like that as best as you can in an environment which is constantly shifting. Accordingly, there are a ...


6

When I was an Israeli paratrooper a general stopped by to give us a little speech about strategy. In infantry battles, he told us, there is only one strategy: Fire and Motion. You move towards the enemy while firing your weapon. The firing forces him to keep his head down so he can't fire at you. (That's what the soldiers mean when they shout ...


1

A tricky problem, especially when players know more than their characters should. The BlackEagle/BlackEagle Operative's kit has some nice small unit tactics. However ultimately this is what the dice are for. The GM has to describe events to the player's satisfaction but the players can't use their own skills for the character's benefit. Fixing a ...


2

If I were you, I would take it in bits and pieces. You might learn some basics to start, if you're really a fish out of water; perhaps Murphy's Laws are a good, digestible place to start that at least will help you understand the mindset of your average experienced grunt. Then, if you're worried about combat tactics, read up on the specific tactics (like ...


4

A few RPG-specific resources are GURPS SWAT and GURPS Cops. Both of them are available over PDF, and they focus on procedural and tactical situations.


18

You could always learn from real life. The US Army has some field manuals available online. For example, FM 3-06, Urban Operations might be of interest to your specific needs. There are countless other sites that will sell you training manuals of varied usefulness. I do not recommend any of them, mostly because I am no expert there. History would be your ...


7

There are a few corpse references we can look at that might help you make an informed decision. First is the Animate Dead spell, PHB pg.212; Choose a pile of bones or a corpse of a Medium or Small humanoid within range. [...] The target becomes a skeleton if you chose bones or a zombie if you chose a corpse. In this case, a pile of bones does not ...


6

Corpse is the one aspect you need to consider, the other is. The corpse must still have a mouth.... A skeleton skull is basically the head bone structure + a jawbone. Whether that is sufficient to constitute a mouth is up to you. Dictionary defines corpse as the remains of a body. It does not define the state of the body. So the skeletal remains ...


0

In my experience (that is mostly on D&D, not SW), it is the players that determine which NPCs are memorable or not. Your role as a GM is mostly to notice which NPCs they like more, and find out why they like it. In general terms, you should remember that the NPC roles are to complement the party abilities, not to overshadow them (that would be the mary ...


1

It is important to bear in mind what makes the PCs different from the NPCs, aside from the obvious fact of player vs non-player. In short, the PCs are the protagonists, and the NPCs aren't. In my games, even if the PCs don't start out in this position, and even if the plot does not take on epic world-spanning dimensions, the PCs are Luke Skywalkers, the ...


1

Play the NPCs as characters. Give them motivations, goals, principles, and so on. Not every NPC has to be very detailed, but you should be able to make up something on the spot to give depth to NPCs. Be ready to take notes - maybe on the spot, you have a secondary character say that they're a refugee from the valley to the east - write it down. Make the ...


2

MOP Every NPC needs a mop. Motivation: Why is the character here in the story? What motivates them to act? Objective: What does the character want to accomplish as a goal in the story? What is the character's overriding goal they must achieve? Personality: How the character acts as well as their personal appearance. These three traits help define an ...


0

NPCs are a myth! Try GM controlled Characters. These are your characters, make them and play them as such. NPCs, truly minor characters, such as shopkeepers, barmaids and the man pushing a broom in the warehouse you are breaking into, can simply be a one line entry in your notes. However, people the Player Characters interact with regularly, such as ...



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