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5

Since you're building this NPC to support your party of three, build it as a Companion instead. The main reason monsters are different in D&D 4e is to provide them with just the powers that would be useful in a single encounter, without worrying too much about daily resources or situational powers. Just to make a comparison with monsters built as PCs, ...


2

As the rules state it, yes, this would be an exception However, if you want to make this ranger a little stronger, you may want to give it feats. Also as others have said, a simpler (and possibly more effective) solution could be to re-skin a monster. It would already be balanced and you don't have to put the effort into building it.


2

Use a reskinned monster instead. These are already balanced and you don't have to worry about construction rules. Find one of the appropriate level with the properly themed powers and just hand it to your PCs to play with. This saves you tons of headaches with NPC creation rules (which are likely out of balance pretty dramatically at this point), and keeps ...


0

Depends on the Player Not everyone is okay with playing a character who's not entirely theirs, or having a character of theirs played. However you do this, there are really two possible options: The character is yours, a NPC, and is treated as such. The character is theirs, a PC, and is treated as such. This will inform your course of action as events ...


0

Generally the DM/GM should either play the character or remove the character temporarily from the events at hand. This allows the other players to continue playing their own characters without having to worry about another person they must play. It's optimal to entirely remove the character to reduce inconsistencies in behavior or having to explain events to ...


1

If the group is okay with it, I would say the GM plays the character, but gives little input. You merely take the appropriate combat / skill actions, with maybe a minor amount of flavor. But imbuing your own take into the character may lead the player to feeling even more detached from the group than otherwise. That said, there are some other solutions to ...


2

The way I've played this in groups, either the GM or Player (depending on the situation and group) takes control of the player. Your best bet is to talk to the group and come to a consensus. Anything that happens in permanent. So if the character dies, then he dies. You can give the player all the details of what happened, since he should be getting that ...


6

Personification This helps people relate to non-human things. A personified object or creature encourages interaction, and helps people get thinking about what's going on in its "head." Once they're there, though, they may make the mistake of thinking of the personified creature or object as human. This is where the next point comes into effect. Different ...


5

Simple literary device: Personification. Tell the players what the creature is doing and explain what it looks like to them. "The bird caws rapidly and bounces back and forth, head looking over its wing as if to notion there is danger ahead" "The fox regards them coldly as they step into its domain before turning away, uninterested." "The cat dashes ...



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