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30

No, this isn't novel (although that does not mean that it isn't clever design in Numenera). There are two separate things married in that mechanic as you've described it. Both have been done before, and I can think of at least one game that has married them in the same way before. First there is the concept of a pull mechanic. Most GM-initiated events are ...


21

Edge (p. 20) doesn't give you free levels and let you spend it to reduce the Effort spent. When the book says "Once a stat’s Edge reaches 3, you can apply one level of Effort for free," it just means that 3 Effort - 3 Edge = 0. That's what it means by "free". So, the reason your math isn't working is because you're applying Edge twice instead of once. For ...


19

Numenera is not more strongly tied to party size than any other trad style RPG. Like any trad style RPG, however, it's going to have trouble, or at least require special techniques, when dealing with, in this case, less than three or more than six characters. Why Less Than Three? There are three character classes - glaives, jacks, and nanos. In class ...


10

I had asked this directly to Monte Cook and Shanna Germain, and, straight from Shanna's keyboard: Not at all. It likely depends on how many people the GM is comfortable having around the table more than anything. All adventures can be scaled up or down by adding additional challenges and creatures, or by raising or lowering the levels of creatures ...


8

I'm going to answer this question in a system-agnostic manner, as the question posed is one I've had to address a great deal in my own games despite never actually running Numenera specifically. (I tend to run superhero games, so it's quite a regular occurrence that I have to balance combats for a diverse group of character abilities.) Your first priority ...


8

You do not have a problem, you just think you do... In my not so humble opinion, party balance is a myth, and power gamers will game any system no matter what house rules you use. So, my advise is do not even try. In Numeneria, the recommended way is to split the XP pool but that is just that: a guideline. Any player should be free to use the XP in ...


7

Numenera is a game that is fairly resistant to the effects of party imbalance, so it isn't too much of a problem once your players realize that experience spent on short-term benefits can mean the difference between life and death (or at least unconsciousness), and you realize that setting difficult encounters can sometimes be a good thing. You will learn ...


7

The cypher system is extremely simple, which is one of it's great strengths, and I think the system by itself can stand up just fine without cyphers. After all, ultimately they are just items, and there is an upper limit on how many you can carry anyway, so they aren't required to be able to play a normal game. However, virtually any of the existing written ...


6

Several good suggestions have been made, but they're all from later than West End Games' classic Torg, which is the earliest game I can think of to make fate points and XP the same thing. Torg's "possibilities" represented the ability to manipulate fate both in- and out-of-character. Possibilities were earned where other games have xp. They could be spent ...


6

In Numenera practically everything has a level, but there is no such thing as an item level as opposed to a cypher level - a cypher, like a door, like a lock, like an NPC, just has a single level associated with it which is a measure of its power, ability, resilience, what it takes to craft with it, and just about anything else that would require a roll or ...


6

I've been in this situation. Or rather, I've been in a situation similar enough: One of the PCs had started flying ("Who manipulates gravity"), and all the thugs attacking them were bound to the ground. I hadn't prepared for that situation, as that character had only just joined the group. Fortunately, Numenera has a convenient mechanic that works perfectly ...


5

Note in advance that there is no published reference to exactly how this should be treated (that I can find) - this is based purely on the otherwise published intent of the experience system of the game (and how I interpret it). Also note that the Numenera core rulebook as written does feature many ambiguous and seemingly unpolished rules, so are often open ...


5

The GM always sets the difficulties that need to be beaten, as such, when players interact with an NPC that requires the NPC to do something (such as asking him to pick a lock for them) you decide the difficulty of the lock and if the NPC isn't high enough level to meet or beat that DC, they fail. An NPC who is Level 5 at Lockpicking always succeeds (unless ...


5

Well, to me it looks like a mix between Hero Points as found in Hero Quest and Fate points from FATE games. HeroQuest's Hero Points : Though they're only awarded at the end of an adventure, they too can be used as much to advance the character as to bump up one's results in a skill contest. Fate Points, on the other hand, are a "story currency" that goes ...


4

This is not an easy question to answer in terms of scope, but I'll give it a try. Spycraft and Exalted both offer players devil deals regarding XP. Either take this in game benefit, or you can take extra XP. In Spycraft this was based on Action Point/Hero Point style narrative currency tokens that you could spend in game for various effects or keep for ...


4

Page 22 states Instead of applying Effort to reduce the difficulty of your attack, you can apply Effort to increase the amount of damage you inflict with an attack. For each level of Effort you apply in this way, you inflict 3 additional points of damage. This works for any kind of attack that inflicts damage... and page 53 states, for "Shroud ...


3

When the player initiates it, it definitely costs XP as according to p112; it's like gaining a new esotery or skill, but follows the rules for crafting on p107-108. The group does not gain XP in this way. For instance, p108 says, If the tinkering results in a long-term benefit for the character - such as creating an artifact that she can use - the GM ...


3

When using the artifact against an NPC, the player would only roll to hit (since it's an aimed long-range weapon), which would be a Speed roll for the purposes of knowing what pool to spend from for effort, et al. The NPC would then either pass or fail defending against the stun intellect-based effect based on whether its level was equal-to-or-higher or ...


3

I came up with an idea for a house rule regarding XP. I remember reading a bit in the core book about how it would be acceptable for a GM to limited the amount of XP that could be spent on Advancement at higher Tiers. Also, I like the idea that when you get higher in ability, advancement becomes slower. So here's my idea: At low Tiers, you can spend your XP ...


3

It would apply - think about it this way; a task is impossible to achieve whether it is difficulty 10 or 11 so the question is purely academic at that point. But if a character applies 5 levels of effort and is also dazed, the net modifeir to the difficulty is -5 + 1 = -4 i.e. difficulty 6.


3

Numenera is designed for a party of any size It’s important to note that creature toughness or any other kind of difficulty in the game is a matter of the GM giving meaning to the fictional reality of the setting, not performing game mechanical mathematic surgery. There is no concept in Numenera of “a challenge of N level is appropriate to a party of N+X ...


2

This is not specific to Numenera but party size in a role playing game has a quadratic effect on player-player interactions. Too few and the game feels dead. Too many and the game gets lost in the players. The relationship is N(N-1)/2 for N players. Two players have one relationship and three have three relationships (1-2, 1-3, 2-3). Four players have ...


2

The earliest example I've encountered of XP doing double duty as drama points is first edition Shadowrun (released in 1989, which beats Torg by a year, according to Wikipedia). Players are awarded Karma at the end of each session, which can then be used as either Good Karma (spending it on permanent improvements to the character, such as skill increases) or ...


2

trained = -1 to difficulty specialized = -2 to difficulty asset can reduce difficulty at most by -2 Edge is a stat pool and at 3 it becomes free 1xEffort It's not Effort 13. That's how much you need to pay a stat for that Effort. Edge 6 = Effort 2 3+2+2+2+2+2 is NOT Effort 13 but Stat X cost for Effort 6. If that was the case you could reduce Difficulty ...


2

You can buy PDFs of the rules from RPGNow. If you're looking to join a group as a player, the Player's Guide should be all you need.


2

Two options: enemies die, players slaughter them easily, they waltz through this area. level up the enemies so that they present at least a smidge of a challenge. An easy way to do this on the fly is to have the enemies realize they are being out-classed, so that they pull back and regroup. Give them better weapons, have them call in a "leader" who ...


1

Sounds like the artifact shoots a visible beam of energy that upon hitting does damage and a chance to stun. So..the target would have to make a Speed Defense roll against 15 (3 x artifact's level) in order to see if they are hit by the beam. If hit, then they automatically take the 2 points of Intellect damage and then need to make an Intellect Defense roll ...


1

Are the enemies smart enough to realize they can't harm their opponents? If so, they should probably flee, with any plot/character ramifications that entails. No reason to stick around when you have no chance of winning. Then again, if you want to have a fight at that point in the adventure, it's perfectly acceptable to increase their damage, along with the ...


1

According to the description here and elsewhere, the maximum difficulty level is 10. Which already means "Impossible - a task that normal humans couldn’t consider" so that's a clue. I have never seen a Numenera roll adjudicated at a higher difficulty level than 10. Even a 7 is getting toward the impossible. "The upper levels of difficulty, 7, 8, 9, or ...


1

I think that interventions were created, in part, to answer that. If an NPC does a task for a PC, then an intervention is warranted: The lock is open but broken so anyone can see it's been forced. The PC gain the answer to their question but a vital piece of information is missing/misleading. The PC get the task done but some complication arise. Remember ...



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