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88

By definition, nothing's going to happen in an empty room (though see below). There are no hidden doors to find, no puzzles to solve, no enemies to fight. So what's their purpose? Bringing the dungeon to life While all the orcs may sit around in a guard room waiting for PCs to show up, where do they sleep, what do they eat, what happens to their trash? ...


55

History D&D started as a series of little booklets, now called "original D&D" (OD&D). These booklets were basically barely-edited versions of the house rules of Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson. In 1977, TSR hired J. Eric Holmes to develop a Basic D&D game. This was a dark blue, boxed set containing D&D in a single book, plus a module (B1 ...


19

The progression went like this Chainmail was a set of rules for wargaming with miniatures. People wanted to fight the battles they read about in Lord of the Rings, Conan, and other fantasy novels of the time. So the Fantasy Supplement was added. Dave Arneson was inspired by David Wesley Braunstein game to create his own version. He used the Man to Man and ...


19

Do you know the room is empty? (Of course you do.) Do your players know? How do they know? Is the room totally smooth material without a single crack or joint? That would be most unusual, and hence interesting. Dungeons are typically uneven and roughly hewn, run-down by poor climate, and probably not entirely clean. Is there as much as a piece of rotting ...


12

A quick look at Gygax's polearm list and any good historical reference to polearms will tell you that Gygaxian design was far less concerned with history than the appearance of history. He makes distinctions that really aren't, and goes well into "overclassification." Likewise, "Plate Mail" is a completely bogus term. Mail means chain; nothing else is mail. ...


10

Don't forget the entries for the One Page Dungeon contests. There's at least one (Tomb of Song) in the first compilation that might work for you.


9

The answer is provisionally sort of. It grew out of historical miniature wargaming, but it is more complicated then that. There was an article written by: Paul La Farge Sept. 2006, "Destroy All Monsters", that can answer this question better than anything else I know. Go here to read the article here: Destory All Monsters There is more information here ...


8

1973: woodgrain box D&D. 1974-76: supplements come out for D&D 1977: Holmes collates the "basic" set, incorporating much of Supplements 1 & 2 into the rules. White editions of original rules sold as "Classic D&D", AD&D announced. 1979: AD&D starts to be released, with the PH, based firmly in Holmes' work. 1981: Moldvay simplifies the ...


8

D&D Moldvay only covers to level 6. Cook wrote expert. However, Moldvay states: 4 2 1st level, 1 2nd level<br> 5 2 1st level, 2 2nd level<br> 6 3 1st level, 2 2nd level D&D Basic, p. B18 No third level clerical spells are included in Moldvay. Cook Expert shows your hop: L Title Spells 1 Acolyte - - - ...


8

The only reference to creating Magic Items in the 1974 edition of Dungeons & Dragons is found on page 6 and 7 of Volume I (Men & Magic). In there it says Wizards and above may manufacture for their own use (or for sale) such items as potions, scrolls, and just about anything else magical. Looking at the level chart on page 16 of Volume I we ...


7

In the 1970s, D&D was played in a very abstract manner. Were you to get realistic -- such as calculating the treasure available and comparing it to local or national finance -- the result would immediately show the absurdity of the system. But that didn't matter; the point was to have fun and not worry about the details. (My how things have changed in 30 ...


7

Empty of threat, but there can be plenty of other things to make it interesting: Maybe it's just a smell (pleasant or not) the corpse/bones of a past adventurer (looted) some small inconsequential animals that flee (spiders or normal sized rats) There could also be something potentially useful: Maybe there's a pool of water that could be made potable ...


6

I either use the XP for gold rule, or I eliminate it entirely. In my earlier-edition games I prefer to see characters level organically, gaining XP as slowly or quickly as the players' choices enable them to given the opportunities presented by the DM. Taking a laissez-faire approach to the PCs' levelling removes some of the pressure on the DM to make sure ...


6

I think it can be done quite easily. In Labyrinth Lord, each monster has a set of Saving Throws like this: MONSTER SAVING THROWS Save Type: GM rolls this or better Chance of save: Breath Attacks: 16 5/20 Poison or Death: 11 10/20 Petrify or Paralyze: 14 ...


6

Found this in a 2009 WotC blog post: 1st Edition AD&D allowed for PCs to create magic items, but the #1 piece of advice given to the DM in this regard was, "Do not tell them how this is to be accomplished!" (DMG, pg. 116). Characters had to discover every aspect of the process through quests or trial-and-error. The challenge was so daunting for players ...


6

Mechanically, you could easily remove individual scores from any edition of Dungeons & Dragons prior to 3e, simply by declaring that all characters have average ability scores of 10 or 12. (For 3rd edition or latter, you'll need to take the additional step of declaring what happens when characters get an ability score increase.) Doing so makes for a ...


5

I hesitate to answer, because the only answer I can think of is tangential to your question. Really, classic D&D relies on the DM is making certain kinds of decisions, and part of that decision process involves rolling to decide things behind the scenes. I absolutely love semi-diceless mechanics, but there are so many parts of class D&D that I just ...


5

Here are some original old school D&D modules that should be easy to find and not cost you an arm or a leg if you buy them online: I1 The Forbidden City (TSR, 1980): Old school AD&D sandbox setting in a "lost" jungle city inhabited by snakemen (yuan ti), frogmen (bullywugs), and lots of other weird and dangerous creatures. Lots of room for ...


5

Ruins of Ramat by Brave Halfling will work well. It has a pair of demonic creatures (low level) so the referee can definitely present it as a bit of weird fantasy. I ran it successfully at several conventions and in my campaign. For older material you can get Book of Treasure Maps City State of the Invincible Overlord, the new version is good as well and ...


5

Come on people...the dice! Adam mentions that the Holmes version came with chits instead of dice after a while. When it came with chits, it also came with a coupon for a set of polyhedra. These were terrible, soft, twisted and awesome! The white d20 would turn pretty spherical and roll forever after a year or so of play. The blue d12 was as soft as ...


5

You can easily search for that on RPGGeek, which has a comprehensive database of all RPG products. Here's the search for D&D, and you can then drill down by version and filter by product type if you don't want cards and whatnot. Or given your specific needs, the RPG.net database distinguishes AD&D out from D&D. That includes second edition.


5

Make a list of room types for the kind of area you are mapping, for example barracks, storeroom, larder, kitchen. For ruins, you can go by what the ruins used to be. These can be in a greater state of decay, such as an armory with the rusted remains of swords and axes. Empty rooms will not appear empty. They will have a room type from your list and ...


5

Potential Tactical Space If you're playing a game with lots of empty dungeon rooms, then you should consider all of those potential combat zones. And you should consider making them have tactical value in some way that maybe players or smart monsters might try to move the fight into a location better suited for them. Narrow bridges, chokepoints, places ...


4

The Acaeum Rulebooks: http://acaeum.com/ddindexes/rulebooks.html Modules: http://acaeum.com/ddindexes/modcode.html Miscelleaneous: http://acaeum.com/ddindexes/misc.html "The Rares" http://acaeum.com/ddindexes/rares.html


4

A d12 skill system can be very elegant. See for instance Lord Kilgore's direct translation of the thief skill progression to d12. http://www.lordkilgore.com/labyrinth-lord-d12-thief-skills My ref uses a roll-high d12. Add your skill bonus to your roll; if the total is 12 or higher it's a success. E.g. with a +1 bonus you must roll 11 or 12, so 1/6 chance. ...


4

For my campaigns, both back in the 80s and today, I ditched the gold for XP system. There are plenty of things that players can and want to spend gold on in my setting (like building a stronghold) so that accumulation of wealth isn't that big of an issue. In its placed I use a roleplaying award. It is calculated as: <level> times <xp factor> ...


4

As a GM, do you think in percentages? If so, and if you're going to tweak in LFP, then skip the d12 and jump to the d20. That makes it much easier to award bonuses & penalties in 5% increments. When that 1/6 is downshifted to 3/20 the difference is miniscule (1.6%)... or what the heck, tilt it in the player's favor (4/20); it won't change the game. ;>


4

I would even suggest T1 Village of Hommlet or B2 Keep on the Borderlands. These two adventure are great places to start and have the potential of building into larger adventures later on. And as mentioned above, the one page dungeon collection. Those are a lot of fun and are small enough (most of them) to do in one or two sessions to get your new player ...


4

First some data to get a handle on how much people carrying. I found this excerpt on google books where a newspaper stated that a porter was expected to carry 100 lbs for ten miles a day. In Andes regulations limit the weight porters carry to 20 kg or 44 lbs. The general recommendation is 20% to 25% of your body weight if you want to hike all day. Which ...


3

Dragonsfoot is a pretty good resource, too. Their adventure section has a lot of adventures, including low level adventures. In the 1-4 range, I like: DF14: Goblins Tooth I: Moonless Night by Lorne Marshall, for 6-10 characters of level 1-3 DF18: Where the Fallen Jarls Sleep, by John A. Turcotte, for characters level 3-5 L4: Devilspawn, by Len Lakofka, ...



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