Hot answers tagged

36

Yes, originally expected in 2015, 5e OGL and SRD arrived on Jan 2016. OGL is now embedded in the SRD, available here: http://dnd.wizards.com/articles/features/systems-reference-document-srd 5e OGL is essentially the same with 3r OGL word for word (see below). Like 3r SRD (and unlike 4e's), it contains de-flavoured basic player and DM resources that you ...


27

Yes Wizards of the Coast has just released the OGL and SRD for 5e D&D. http://dnd.wizards.com/articles/features/systems-reference-document-srd You can download it for free. Be advised, for each race it only has one sub race, and for each class only one archetype. The spell list is missing a few spells (I saw a Warlock and a Ranger spell missing ...


22

Risking a copyright lawsuit over gaming material based on things somebody you don't know said on a public internet forum is naive at best. You are not talking about peanuts here. A wrong decision can seriously impact your whole life. Get a lawyer. This is the only answer you should get. Even if he tells you the same you read here.


20

If you only want to use the OGL part of their rules, the answer is yes. See this previous question on Is it possible to use rules from OGL or GSL games in a computer game? You have to understand that license and adhere to its terms however. One drawback is that you may not say "Pathfinder" or otherwise claim Pathfinder compatibility if purely using the OGL. ...


20

OK, so here's game intellectual property 101. There are niche exceptions to all of it, but at a high level it's going to hold for 99% of use cases in the free world. If you don't already know all the stuff below you should not enter into any commercial enterprise based on someone else's IP without professional legal advice. You are never free to use ...


18

OGL for d20 Only? The OGL, or Open Game License, was originated by Wizards of the Coast in the year 2000 to use for the D&D rules. But since then, other people have used the same license to openly license other systems. It's like the MIT or Apache or GPL software licenses; anyone can use them, they are not "owned" by the parent company in any ...


17

You're somewhat confused, which is understandable since intellectual property rights and D&D is a confusing issue. OGL The OGL is a specific license with specific terms. D&D 3e/3.5e was made open for others' use under the OGL and the open portion was published as a SRD, or System Reference Document. Other games derived from the d20 SRD (like ...


16

Short version: Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha appears to be available for use, but tread carefully. This is a very gray area, and any advice you get isn't worth much, unless it's from your lawyer. If you copy all of D&D's design, your work clearly infringes on their copyright, and they can easily succeed in a lawsuit against you. If you copy none of their ...


15

What is open content is defined by what is literally present in the SRD itself. Ergo, yes, these are not open content currently. Whether this is an oversight and other options were meant to be made open content, or whether the reference to the three monastic traditions is deliberate because they're leaving in references to non-open content, is to be seen. ...


13

There is no such a single meaning as 'using' content; it depends on what exactly you do with it - are you making a copy? Are you distributing a copy? Are you creating a derived work? etc. Copyright law on literary works, including gaming books, mainly refers to the copying and/or redistributing the actual textual content. It does not apply in any way if you ...


13

No, there is no open license, or free license, or published community use policy for Age of Rebellion, any of the Star Wars games, or any FFG games at all. On the FFG legal page they say in short "this is all ours" and then go on to say: For questions about non-commercial, non-professional use of our intellectual properties for recreational and hobby ...


12

OGL: Yes. For details, see the faq: Q: I want to distribute computer software using the OGL. Is that possible? A: Yes, it's certainly possible. The most significant thing that will impact your effort is that you have to give all the recipients the right to extract and use any Open Game Content you've included in your application, and you have to ...


12

It Depends If you want it to be a complete, stand-alone game then you should include the full book rules. On the other hand, if you want it to be a supplement then only include the new stuff you're doing. Add the Entire Core Rules If… …you want it to be a stand-alone game If you don't like the idea of "Requires a Copy of Fate Core System to play" being ...


11

It's a complex issue. I'm going to use U.S. copyright law, because that's what I'm familiar with. I'm going to go from ultra-basic to our application, so stick with me. What is copyright? Copyright is the legally granted exclusive right to publish and redistribute specific content, particularly things that an individual has made. Corporations, however, ...


11

Technically, what you are able to reproduce from any OGL work is everything that the OGL statement in that work says you can. Now, it's very likely that the PRD has most of that from most of the Pathfinder books, and that it's a pretty good arbiter of how to interpret the OGL statement when it's not clear. However, that's not guaranteed, and if you're ...


11

The differences you have noticed between the core rulebook and the Pathfinder Reference Document are exactly everything that you may not reproduce. Put another way, the PRD exists to be exactly everything that is covered by the OGL. If it's not in the PRD, you may not reproduce it. That's what the name "Pathfinder Reference Document" means: it documents the ...


10

Yes I am not a lawyer and anyone can sue anyone for anything. However... Many RPGs, not under license from D&D using the OGL or otherwise, have used identically named ability scores since 1975 with no legal problems; see this great breakdown of key ability scores in major fantasy games through 1983. Some have more, some have less, most use at least 5 ...


9

So to go into this in a little more detail... Copyright, trademark, and other IP law is a whole separate standalone thing. If they have a trademark on those terms they'd be registered. I suspect those terms are general enough there's no trademark per se. In fact, you can find out. Check out this TESS search for "dungeon" which reveals "Dungeons & ...


9

Talk to a Lawyer This should always be the answer for copyright questions. That said, what you are asking about is largely known as parody. However the legal protections of parody are a complicated matter and may require a lawsuit to defend. Thus, you should consult a copyright lawyer before attempting to publish any material derived from these campaigns. ...


9

I'm not a lawyer or giving legal advice on a course of action, only explaining my understanding of relevant law and licensing. There are two things here: copyright and licensing. They cannot be mixed up if you want a clear picture of what's permitted. Because each use completely different rules, they can have different, even opposite answers! Therefore you ...


8

There is DoubleZero: A Percentile-Based Modern Role Playing System by Berin Kinsman, a retroclone of the James Bond 007 RPG. It has mostly vanished from the net, but the SRD can still be found at http://livingfree.wikidot.com/doublezero-srd


8

Is this an actual error, or is it that not all the options are Open Content per the OGL? Sub-races and Archetypes were specifically excluded from the SRD. From Mike Mearls the D&D guru on this. So Wizards is giving just enough information to create new class Archetypes and Sub-races without actually giving away all of their information.


8

First, read the OGL carefully. If you're even a bit unclear on what the document legally means you're not yet ready to choose it as a license for your own work. If necessary, consult a lawyer. (Usually only necessary for work that involves significant money, however.) With that said, basically yes. Others can use your OGL-licensed content in the exact same ...


7

Most of the actual rules are listed in the online PRD. Most of the thematic stuff and deities (important for clerics) are not listed online and are copyrighted material. Most of what is not online, as you put it, is just "wordiness and pretty pictures". That being said, the PDF is available online directly from Paizo for only $10 (contrasted against $50) ...


7

Easier: mark it in the product by different font face, different box borders, different colors for headers (if using color) make an absolutely open SRD; no closed content except the OGL text and the SRD name. Harder: No SRD use of trademarks within sections otherwise indicated as open no indicators of open content other than the OGL text itself


7

No, third party content for Pathfinder is not automatically open content. However, many third party products do contain open content in whole or in part. The way you can tell is that the product itself tells you. Any OGL product contains a reprint of the OGL license along with a section that indicates what part of the product are Open Game Content and ...


7

If you're only using content from the SRD and your original work, then you can release it under OGL. A conversion of someone else's non-OGL rules from a previous version would not be allowed under the license. The Book of Vile Darkness is "product identity" per page one of the SRD/OGL for D&D Fifth edition. Items marked as Product Identity ... are not ...


5

It's a touch more work — and not easily summarized in this text box — but the Drama-focused version of the Cortex Plus system (as seen in games like Smallville) features a lifepath-based character creation system that takes a PC from childhood all the way to playability. Each step adds assets and resources along the way, and forges connections between the ...


5

There are several. 4C System is a retroclone of TSR's Marvel Super Heroes (FASERIP). Unlicensed, and some subtle differences (including ditching the labels) but it works the same way. There's a retroclone of Classic Traveller, I forget the name, but it's genericized (and not very well done, either). Separately, Mongoose Traveller is a pseudoclone of ...


5

Guardians of Order used it for a variety of subsequent games, like Slayers d20, Hellsing, Trigun, and Uresia. In terms of games from other people, the field is pretty small. Arakos: The Eighth Age from Battlefield Press is the only one currently available. Seraphim Guard used it for Heroic Ages III, Banzai! and Heroes of the Floating Worlds - this was long ...



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