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23

No OGL/GSL for 5e yet. Plan was an announcement @ 2014 fall and release in 2015. At this stage before all core rules are out, there does not exist a public license that grants you the right to create contents based on D&D 5e, whether commercial or not. Here is an official post about it: We want to ensure that the quality of anything D&D fans ...


22

Risking a copyright lawsuit over gaming material based on things somebody you don't know said on a public internet forum is naive at best. You are not talking about peanuts here. A wrong decision can seriously impact your whole life. Get a lawyer. This is the only answer you should get. Even if he tells you the same you read here.


19

OK, so here's game intellectual property 101. There are niche exceptions to all of it, but at a high level it's going to hold for 99% of use cases in the free world. If you don't already know all the stuff below you should not enter into any commercial enterprise based on someone else's IP without professional legal advice. You are never free to use ...


18

OGL for d20 Only? The OGL, or Open Game License, was originated by Wizards of the Coast in the year 2000 to use for the D&D rules. But since then, other people have used the same license to openly license other systems. It's like the MIT or Apache or GPL software licenses; anyone can use them, they are not "owned" by the parent company in any ...


17

If you only want to use the OGL part of their rules, the answer is yes. See this previous question on Is it possible to use rules from OGL or GSL games in a computer game? You have to understand that license and adhere to its terms however. One drawback is that you may not say "Pathfinder" or otherwise claim Pathfinder compatibility if purely using the OGL. ...


15

You're somewhat confused, which is understandable since intellectual property rights and D&D is a confusing issue. OGL The OGL is a specific license. Only D&D 3e/3.5e was made open under the OGL. Other games derived from it (like Pathfinder) and totally unrelated games, like FATE, use the OGL. 5e does not use the OGL (their plans are yet to be ...


11

It's a complex issue. I'm going to use U.S. copyright law, because that's what I'm familiar with. I'm going to go from ultra-basic to our application, so stick with me. What is copyright? Copyright is the legally granted exclusive right to publish and redistribute specific content, particularly things that an individual has made. Corporations, however, ...


11

The differences you have noticed between the core rulebook and the Pathfinder Reference Document are exactly everything that you may not reproduce. Put another way, the PRD exists to be exactly everything that is covered by the OGL. If it's not in the PRD, you may not reproduce it. That's what the name "Pathfinder Reference Document" means: it documents the ...


10

OGL: Yes. For details, see the faq: Q: I want to distribute computer software using the OGL. Is that possible? A: Yes, it's certainly possible. The most significant thing that will impact your effort is that you have to give all the recipients the right to extract and use any Open Game Content you've included in your application, and you have to ...


10

Technically, what you are able to reproduce from any OGL work is everything that the OGL statement in that work says you can. Now, it's very likely that the PRD has most of that from most of the Pathfinder books, and that it's a pretty good arbiter of how to interpret the OGL statement when it's not clear. However, that's not guaranteed, and if you're ...


8

There is DoubleZero: A Percentile-Based Modern Role Playing System by Berin Kinsman, a retroclone of the James Bond 007 RPG. It has mostly vanished from the net, but the SRD can still be found at http://livingfree.wikidot.com/doublezero-srd


8

So to go into this in a little more detail... Copyright, trademark, and other IP law is a whole separate standalone thing. If they have a trademark on those terms they'd be registered. I suspect those terms are general enough there's no trademark per se. In fact, you can find out. Check out this TESS search for "dungeon" which reveals "Dungeons & ...


8

Talk to a Lawyer This should always be the answer for copyright questions. That said, what you are asking about is largely known as parody. However the legal protections of parody are a complicated matter and may require a lawsuit to defend. Thus, you should consult a copyright lawyer before attempting to publish any material derived from these campaigns. ...


7

Most of the actual rules are listed in the online PRD. Most of the thematic stuff and deities (important for clerics) are not listed online and are copyrighted material. Most of what is not online, as you put it, is just "wordiness and pretty pictures". That being said, the PDF is available online directly from Paizo for only $10 (contrasted against $50) ...


5

It's a touch more work — and not easily summarized in this text box — but the Drama-focused version of the Cortex Plus system (as seen in games like Smallville) features a lifepath-based character creation system that takes a PC from childhood all the way to playability. Each step adds assets and resources along the way, and forges connections between the ...


5

There are several. 4C System is a retroclone of TSR's Marvel Super Heroes (FASERIP). Unlicensed, and some subtle differences (including ditching the labels) but it works the same way. There's a retroclone of Classic Traveller, I forget the name, but it's genericized (and not very well done, either). Separately, Mongoose Traveller is a pseudoclone of ...


5

Guardians of Order used it for a variety of subsequent games, like Slayers d20, Hellsing, Trigun, and Uresia. In terms of games from other people, the field is pretty small. Arakos: The Eighth Age from Battlefield Press is the only one currently available. Seraphim Guard used it for Heroic Ages III, Banzai! and Heroes of the Floating Worlds - this was long ...


5

I believe so. I can't find where they state that outright, but they discuss the future of the M&M Superlink license and say it'll be just like True20 licensing, and True20 is OGL at the core. Oh, actually, Steve Kenson stated explicitly on RPGNet that yes, it will be. The OGC portion of the M&M 3E rules can be found at http://www.d20herosrd.com/ ...


5

Mongoose Traveller has an OGL-licensed SRD and a lifepath generation. Traveller Developer's Pack T20 (and it's de-travellerized spawn, Sci-Fi 20) has a d20 system adaptation from the same source as Mongoose: Classic Traveller. There is no SRD, but both are under the Wizards OGL. They went in different directions from CT, but both involve prior service ...


5

(usual disclaimer that I'm not a professional lawyer and that you should consult one) You're quite right to question the PRD as being 100% open content, as there are indeed some PI terms used within it. The PRD's Open Content declaration only specifies that rules included within are open (in similar wording to many printed products that state the same ...


4

No information has been revealed about this yet. News about such plans are only planned to be revealed for a release in 2015


4

Having a physical book vs using free rules or a pdf When you are a new player, or a GM with new players, the ability to have a physical object which contains the rules and classes is invaluable. When being bombarded with new concepts, people will generally be much happier with a pretty-looking book that contains evocative pictures and 'wordiness' and the ...


4

PI vs OGC The real answer is that every single book has a declaration of what parts are considered open content and which are considered PI. All trademarks, registered trademarks, proper names (characters, deities, etc.), dialogue, plots, storylines, locations, characters, artworks, and trade dress. In that, the "etc." is not a general "whatever ...


4

In the general case, you can't, because about 200 companies published a near infinite number of monsters for d20. If you specifically mean "monsters in the small number of WotC monster books that have OGL content" - just the Monster Manual, Epic Level Handbook, Expanded Psionics Handbook (links go to the monster SRDs from each) - if it's not in the SRD, ...


4

Easier: mark it in the product by different font face, different box borders, different colors for headers (if using color) make an absolutely open SRD; no closed content except the OGL text and the SRD name. Harder: No SRD use of trademarks within sections otherwise indicated as open no indicators of open content other than the OGL text itself


3

An adjunct answer that goes directly to the original question updated for FATE 3.0 as presented in The Dresden Files: While the Dresden Files RPG does use the OGL, it deems everything not found in the Spirit of the Century rules to be product identity. So from Evil Hat's point of view, you can't use the new rules, though it is actually a misuse of the OGL ...


3

As I understand it, one of the straightforward ways a publisher can make their OGL product hard to build on by third parties is declaring too much, or key parts, of the content to be Product Identity, whether intentionally or accidentally. How does that work exactly? Some examples include making the text of various powers and mechanics available, but ...


3

Traveller d20 has a lifepath system under the OGL.


3

Life path systems aren't common, so it's not surprising that you haven't found an OGL one yet... But let me remove the problem. Game systems can't be patented, and you can't violate a writer's copyright if you're not copying the text. As a result, you can absolutely go ahead and use ideas you get from existing life path–based games without infringing ...


3

"Not only will you not get [your book] looked at, you won't get it published." R.A. Salvatore, during a Meet the Author speech, stated this and added that not only would it limit you to one specific license that you could sell it to, but you would have to have every citation perfect. He suggests writing something generic that could fit in to a genre and if ...



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