Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

20

A rogue could perhaps play solo. But only if she devoted herself to stealth and avoided all out combat at all costs. D&D is a very much a party based game. And it's best played with a table full of friends, each with their own character. But at the same time, occasionally circumstances require something less than that ideal. There are two options. Go ...


13

A few weeks ago I started DMing for my wife, who also plays an Essentials Hunter. We started at level 1 and are now nearly level 8. Here are a few things I've picked up along the way. Recognize the shortcomings of a Hunter The essentials Hunter, unlike the typical Ranger, doesn't have the possibility of having a beast companion. As such, you will find ...


12

I've done a lot of one-on-one GMing. I lived with a family in 8th grade, and I had a 3-4 daya week one-on-one that went on for a year, as well as a few others early on, a few in college, and then 2 relationships and finally my wife. System is the first question for a lot of reasons. The first is you have to find out what kind of game the player wants. ...


12

Your comment on another answer implied you wanted to hear more about play style, pacing, and social dynamics, so I'll take a (long, it turns out) stab at that. Spend a lot of time with the both of you discussing what the character wants to accomplish. Continually checking in and talking about the character's (and player's) objectives during the game will ...


12

I've run plenty of solo adventures before, both with sidekick characters and with the player on their own. There are several key factors I've found when running solo adventures that make them more enjoyable Pander to what the player likes as much as possible; that isn't to say you make everything a cakewalk - far from it. What you need to do is find what ...


11

I find the physical situation of roleplaying and looking straight at each other's faces is often be too intimate when playing 1 on 1, so I like to have a shared map or other visual reference that's between us, or that we're at 90 degree angles from one another both facing the map. Both the player and GM should have things they want out of the game. They ...


11

My recommendation: don't have "other PC" roles at all. The default Paranoia assumption - a team of Troubleshooters go shoot trouble - is based on the intrigue and backstabbing possible in a full party. A single GM cannot replicate that, especially as you'd blur the troubleshooter treachery with your depiction of a hostile and treacherous world. So don't ...


10

The Fighting Fantasy books are, as you've already discovered, particularly bad choices if you don't want a lot of fighting. I would start not with any published setting--especially since high fantasy and slaying goblins and dragons seem to go hand-in-hand--or even with the idea of a role-playing game at all, but rather collaborative storytelling. Take some ...


10

My advice is twofold. 1. Talk with the player Lets face it, most problems end here. If you haven't talked to him about the problem, do it the next time you see him. Ask what he wants in a role-playing game, and tell him what you want. Then compromise until you are both satisfied. 2. Use a system that does not require a GM This is a slightly different ...


10

New players generally come in two sorts: people already well versed in games like Magic and Risk, maybe Strategy Board games and Fantasy Video games. And people without any exposure, trying to get into it because their significant other is already gaming. It's very easy to find a game for the first group because that's only explaining the rules. They ...


9

I think, in a case like that, it makes sense to a certain extent to tailor the story to that player's character. Think about the kind of character they built, and let their decision and their abilities drive the adventure. This is more than just a question of game mechanics. If they play a ranger, the events of the game can center around what's happening ...


9

I find one of the best genres for one on one RPGs is the superhero genre. Think about it, guys like Spiderman, Daredevil, Batman, Superman, Captain America, etc are always fighting the baddies on their own, so it's not a stretch to set up one player with a main superhero (and maybe a sidekick) and go on an investigation. Villains & Vigilantes (old ...


8

I've quite happily run one-on-one adventures with no changes from the base rules. A higher focus on minions is handy to come within the XP budget and access to personal healing is a must. It works better with defenders, leaders, and controllers than strikers. (Strikers really do require a party behind them to perform at their best.) My own experience ...


8

Mars Colony is an excellent 2-player roleplaying game that was just released. You each take the roles of the Savior of Mars who's being politically "air-dropped" from Earth into the Mars Colony to help solve its problems, and the role of the story-guide who introduces those problems, complicates them, and roleplays the locals the Savior interacts with. It's ...


7

Tailor the game to the two of you. You have opportunities that are not possible with a larger group. My primary experience with 1:1 gaming is with my spouse of 15 years. We played RPGs intensely the whole time. The game was heavily tailored to exactly what each of us wanted to get from the experience. So all manner of interesting stories and changes were ...


6

Here's a second answer… At the bottom of Ron Edward's "about" page for his two-player game S/Lay w/Me, he lists other games that are either two-player or that he thinks are best for two: Breaking the Ice, Shooting the Moon, Sweet Agatha, Tales of the Fisherman’s Wife (best with two, I think), Mars Colony, Showdown, Ghost Dog, Clover (potentially), Thy ...


6

It's not geared specifically towards two players, but The Big List of RPG Plots is my first stop in similar situations. Any Old Port in the Storm, Don't Eat the Purple Ones, Recent Ruins, and Stalag 23 would all be fairly easy to set up, and well-suited for a single player to handle.


6

Pathfinder addressed the issue of Monk's BAB in an elegant fashion (IMO). Monks keep their medium progression BAB (3/4 level) but, when she uses Flurry of Blows, she applies her entire class level as BAB albeit a penalty for using the equivalent of Two-Weapon Fighting. So, at 1st level, she has BAB pf +0. But if she takes a full-round action to flurry, she ...


6

Solo Itself I don't think there are any house rules required to play Pathfinder one-on-one. There are solo adventures for Pathfinder from Expeditious Retreat Press and have been for other D&D versions over time as well. All that's required is DMing. Since there's one PC, they will need difficulties tuned to them and some kind of safety net in case of ...


6

I would love to just say "yes", but actually it depends on the player and style of play. If you have a player who is good at coming up with details themselves, and you play the game in a very "ask questions" kind of way, and you're good at roleplaying NPCs as self-determined entities, then yes, you can have some awesome games. There are a couple caveats, ...


5

Superhero games are GREAT for one on one gaming. Think about it: Batman, Wolverine, Spiderman, Daredevil, Hulk, Superman, the list goes on, solo superheroes are always going on adventures by themselves. Work up a mini-campaign to be finished in one night, with the other guy playing the lone wolf superhero trying to finish the goal. It doesn't have to be all ...


5

Burning Wheel does a great job of supporting one-on-one games. The system emphasizes the protagonist's personal goals and moral conflicts, which makes it a great fit for character-driven one-on-one. There's a section in the Adventure Burner supplement dedicated to discussing one-on-one play. The main thing for these kinds of games is that there will be no ...


5

When I played with my wife we simply used Labyrinth Lord (old school D&D), used only one player character, a lot of hirelings and henchmen, and tried to avoid combat if possible. Hirelings are somewhat different from characters in that they are basically level 0 or level 1 characters. Unfortunately for them they often ended up being used as early warning ...


5

I have run a few one GM, one player games and they are really intense, almost tiring for the player especially. I found most players were pretty well cooked after two or three hours of that kind of play. I like the character to be injected into a situation where there are lots of NPC's to interact with...a city filled with a colorful criminal underworld, a ...


5

One on one play is a great time to develop a characters backstory; You need common ground between you and your player (otherwise, why are you gaming together?!) the characters background should be a ripe source of information you can plunder for this as well as motivations for what they want to do. The trick is, however, to remember that you as the GM are ...


4

There are a whole lot of RPGs that don't require the old "big balanced party" kind of thing. Some new/indie games are the "meant just for two people" romantic gimmicky thing, but there's no reason you can't run anything from octaNe to Eclipse Phase to Feng Shui with one player and a GM. Unless the game specifically has "player interaction" mechanics as ...


4

I really like your Burn Notice idea, that would be an excellent way to start out. If you look at the show there are usually 2-3 event/encounters that happen in the show that move the story plot and characters along. If you use this you should have an easily managed event sequence that will make sense. One thing to note in Burn Notice is the 'assistants' ...


4

I have done a lot of one-on-one roleplaying similar to what you are describing, and I think there are several different approaches. You can use some of these simultaneously or (with a bit of work) switch between them throughout a long campaign, but each is pretty much a stand alone technique that at least for me has made solo games work well. Run Solo ...


4

Yes, you can have one player control a whole party of adventurers. There's really no way to do it wrong! (Really, there's very few ways to play roleplaying games wrong, and this is especially harmless.) I've played multiple PCs and GMed for multiple PCs controlled by the same player before. It's really not a situation that's a problem, just unusual. Like ...


4

Trollbabe Trollbabe is a very simple system, based on scene-level resolution and distributed narration. It's a great way to hit the ground running with the creative side of roleplaying with a system that encourages big dramatic situations. The best way to understand what it's good for is to just go read some actual play — check out "Heart Ripper." ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible