Hot answers tagged

41

Give the NPCs a title or nickname. Your example already has one built in, rather than referring to him by his full name, Introduce him as Captain Rastafi ibn Halum, but have other NPCs refer to him as The Captain or Captain Halum. You'll give your players something they can grip easily and there is a better chance of them remembering the title and their ...


14

Is it necessarily a problem? If everyone's fine with it and you don't have that many characters so there's no confusion having people say "I want to talk to the guard commander" then that's ok. People forget names in real life. If it is a problem, then it's probably because you either have many people with similar, possibly overlapping roles, and/or many ...


9

There are some real-life hints to remember names you could use. Repeating the name many times when your players are meting the NPC is a good tatic "Hallo, my name is Alabelardo, Alabelardo Billocalal, but you can call me only Alabelardo. Also, he could give a nick name to ease the remembering process "My name is Alabellardo, but you can call me Lard". A ...


9

Google hangouts. Invite yourself twice, mute one instance. When I've presented at conferences, remotely, I've driven two instances of google hangouts in exactly this way. So long as you've got one of the instances' audio completely cut out (I recommend the screenshare), and enough bandwidth to push both, you're just fine. You have to use multiple google ...


8

Parsely games are, like their spiritual ancestors, meant to be replayed as part of the learning curve, until enough skill is acquired to achieve success. Failure is a legitimate end state, since the metagame can include “okay let's try again.” Let them keep playing, exploring, and learning things that will prove useful in their eventual replay. Maybe ...


8

I have NOT run Dungeon World online, but I have run two other *World games online, and I've run Dungeon World at a table. I do have a lot of experience running online, and the playstyle I've evolved is similar in a lot of respects to what Dungeon World is trying for. Dungeon World's biggest challenge, regardless of playing venue, is the lack of structured ...


4

Skype allows multiple streams; I use it to tutor my brother, who lives far from me, and he shares both his screen (so I can see what he's working on) and his webcam (so I can see his face). Recently, they added multiple video chat, but I've never used it with the screen-sharing function so I'm not 100% sure it will allow both multiple recipients and two ...


4

I recommend using the Dice Roller here: http://catchyourhare.com/diceroller/ It allows you to share a password, and then roll and manipulate dice on a virtual tabletop. This works really well for Dogs, because you all roll your piles of dice (each player using a different color) and then they can move them around as they are used in the conflict, and ...


4

Some people remember what they hear, others remember what they see. I am visual, names go in one ear and out the other. I usually cannot remember a name told me unless I repeat it to myself to keep it in short term memory, and if I'm doing that I'm not listening to whoever is talking. Try writing the name (legibly, in large black print!) on an index card ...


3

In addition to Longspeak's excellent answer, I'll note that using a chat client that supported multiple simultaneous chat threads that display side-by-side was a big help when I was running Apocalypse World this way. Using multiple chat windows, I could run somewhat-simultaneous scenes if the party split up, or characters who weren't the focus of a scene ...


2

I don't know how much this will be close to what you are searching for, but I follow a (hacked) 5E D&D show at itmeJP's Twitch channel called The West Marches, featuring a consistent GM and based off ars ludi's West Marches. Long story short, it's based of a permanent sandbox world where a rotating cast of players go on adventures, with a main central ...


2

I was in a group with one remote player for a little over two years, and have also taken part in multiple long-term online-only campaigns using various tabletops. I don't really disagree with anything Dorian said, but I'm posting this to elaborate on how we did it, and explain my experience with the tools we used. Please note up front -- if you are playing ...


2

We've played a game with a single member abroad a few months ago, and it was, well, workable. A webcam set to view the entire group This one allows the distant user to see the other people at the table, which is critical for the social aspect. (Even if you're using an online tool, consider using cameras to support it. I've played without and it costs a ...


1

I would use a tool for playing online. I'm sure there are some available, but I wrote my own. It was a basic chat client that allowed private messages to the DM / group, and dice rolls - including players/DM rolling hidden dice that only the DM can see. Players like to roll their dice even if they can't see the result. So we used the app and everyone can ...


1

Just keep playing for as long as they're engaged, even in if they're in a near hopeless state. Restarting is a common and expected outcome that they'll eventually figure out (or quit playing, which is also fine). Wait for them to ask for help to tell them about the inventory command. From Action Castle (Parsely #1): Special Commands There is ...


1

I am currently trialing using an Org Chart. Obviously it is only appreciable the NPC's form into a Hierarchy, or some kind of relationship graph. But they should form a relationship graph, otehrwise you have NPC's that don't relate. In my game It is important that the players remember who a double handful or other people in the organization are. I gave ...


1

I am currently doing this as the "player who moved away" playing in a weekly game with friends who still meet up at the old venue. The good news is that is it very workable. However, the limitations I have faced are not visual, but sound-based. And that's even though we play with exploration and combat on a shared map (D&D 5E currently). Invest in a ...


1

You can also look at zoom (zoom.com) but it does cost a little money. It works fairly nicely as I use it for business. Although I rarely use the chat typing functionality and opt for the microphone. It does have one however.


1

While there are likely many solutions to this, many of which might even be a mix of the two below, I feel these two are the most straightforward ways of addressing this without some sort of specialized setup. At least until we get Virtual Reality up to Sci-Fi levels lol. Webcams are your friend. One of the first solutions to come to mind would be the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible