Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

44

When I've played (or joined in others playing) these quiet characters, the best way to run them is have an almost noir style internal monologue. "I looked at the wall, and frowned. I wasn't certain, but there might be something behind it. Best not to mention it though, I'd look like a chump if I was wrong." is much more interesting than. "..." ...


25

Ask Them The most important question here is why they aren't engaging with you on this. We can't answer that. They can, but you have to ask them. If you do that, be calm and polite. If someone says something that you don't agree with, DO NOT ARGUE WITH THEM! Trying to argue with them about their opinion on this matter will just make them turn defensive, and ...


20

Use out-of-character discussion to let the other players know you're engaged and not bored. This is more important in online gaming because you don't have any body language, eye contact, or other social cues to work with. In particular, tell them that you're playing a loner. Engage with the group in-character privately, when NPCs aren't around. Keep your ...


17

Let them know that they don't have to do theatrical stuff. Ease them in with third person statements like "My character chats up the female manticore" or first-person "I tell the guard I'm working for the King" etc. and let them develop into deeper immersion. Some people never do; it's not a requirement and there's no need to penalise them for not doing it ...


15

I play online almost exclusively these days, using MapTool. I DM two campaigns, and this particular issue comes up often enough. First, you have to keep things interesting. Try to design combats with more than just "attack roll -> damage roll". It's not a simple task, but it's really important to make combats interesting. Add some ranged enemies, healing ...


12

Let's combine some of this into a compendium. Play-by-chat has been at least 80% of my time spent as a GM. It is a fun way to play because it allows immersion and in-character roleplaying to have more depth by allowing players to write their words and actions, which most people are quite comfortable with. But like all other RPG sessions, you need players. ...


10

This is probably more straightforward advice than you're looking for, but my primary strategy is to give the DM everything he needs in one post, or at least as much as I can with the information I have. At the most basic level this means providing both attack and damage dice, whether or not I know that the attack will hit, but this also extends into other ...


9

Usually I either describe the dungeon verbally, only drawing out the rooms that the players interact with, or I draw the overview of the map on another sheet of paper. I think the problems you're having are a symptom of using an online table. Here are some ideas. Do the dungeon verbally .. err... textually. Describe rooms to the players. Load them up ...


9

Using Roll20 Fog of War: I found this aspect of Roll20 is nice if you have the time to set it up correctly, but I didn't find it added a lot of value for my players. I've taken the approach of drawing my map out as we go, without using Fog of War. That way I only have to add the details that are necessary as we go, rather than drawing out every detail and ...


9

There's two ways to make the loner character work in an rpg. First, descriptively. Constantly narrate HOW you do things, the gestures, the attitude that comes across in your actions, along with the internal monologue. (Brian Ballsun-Stanton's answer is very good about this). Second, have small conversations instead of big ones Get aside with another PC ...


8

Google hangouts. Invite yourself twice, mute one instance. When I've presented at conferences, remotely, I've driven two instances of google hangouts in exactly this way. So long as you've got one of the instances' audio completely cut out (I recommend the screenshare), and enough bandwidth to push both, you're just fine. You have to use multiple google ...


6

I would "pick my battles" when choosing to apply this flaw in a RP situation. I have a character who personally hates all his party-mates: he is only with them to make sure they don't do too much damage to innocents. I only allow my character to be open about his hatred once, or MAYBE twice in an evening, and in such a way that it allows the others to play ...


6

Bringing someone into RP over a voice medium for the first time is difficult, especially if you have players who do not know each other. I would recommend getting the group together on Skype for something not related to gaming, where you are not putting anyone on the spot for decisions or roleplay. A fun option is to pick a movie off Netflix if everyone ...


6

Lead by Example Exhibit the behaviors you want to see. When your players type a question, reply to it by voice. Be sure not to exclude them, or even to let the comfortable players hog the spotlight. Make sure you query them directly - OK, Joe, what do you do? (of course, if your table's convention is to use character names, do that instead) When they ...


5

I have been player and GM for IRC based games for going on 15 years. I have played Shadowrun on IRC several times, but I will focus on the general advice of playing crunchy games on IRC, as it applies equally to Shadowrun and anything else. Dispense with charts. As a rule of thumb, every time you have to look at a chart, that costs about 8 minutes of game ...


5

You say: The whole map feels like just one big encounter map if we "walk" through it. Instead of specific areas being unique encounters (like "the Torture Chamber is plagued by ghosts" or "this Slime Pit is the home of a Solo Monster") my players start leading the monster into other parts of the map, sometimes making the long encounter way ...


4

Rpol.net is a great tool for this purpose. Not only are all posts made in the name of your character rather than your account name, but all posts are only visible to the people the GM allows. Except of course for moderators and the site owners. It is also free.


4

It's not nearly as common as Play-by-post games, but I've certainly seen posts recruiting for play-by-chat games on the Paizo forums. It's especially a good fit since you're looking for Pathfinder players.


4

Roll20 has private forums for each campaign, and no site policy on the language you use there. While Roll20 has subscriptions (US$5-10 per month or US$50-100 per year), they are not required to play – rather, the subscriptions add convenience features. I have seen both German and Russian language games looking for players in Roll20's LFG forum, and ...


3

They take 5 to 10 minutes to think and decide what to do and soon they start losing interest in combat. This seems to be the core of the problem. It shouldn't be necessary to take 5-10 minutes for combat, especially Savage Worlds where combat turns are relatively quick and can be done in a minute or less. You didn't say whether or not this delay was ...


3

RPG-Directory.com is a really active forum community for play-by-post roleplayers, perhaps a good place to start chatting with people and finding someone to suit your game?


3

Skype allows multiple streams; I use it to tutor my brother, who lives far from me, and he shares both his screen (so I can see what he's working on) and his webcam (so I can see his face). Recently, they added multiple video chat, but I've never used it with the screen-sharing function so I'm not 100% sure it will allow both multiple recipients and two ...


3

I recommend using the Dice Roller here: http://catchyourhare.com/diceroller/ It allows you to share a password, and then roll and manipulate dice on a virtual tabletop. This works really well for Dogs, because you all roll your piles of dice (each player using a different color) and then they can move them around as they are used in the conflict, and ...


2

1) Don't rush things It can be tempting to try and start the game off with a flurry of activity, refreshing the thread constantly, replying to every little thing as soon as possible, pushing players to post as often as possible, but ultimately you won't be able to keep this up. The game will start to slow down, and once that starts, there's no stopping it. ...


2

Playing becomes very boring since it's a mess to constantly move the character minis on the map every time they wish to check something and I constantly have to fiddle with the Fog of War. Some rooms that only have loot feel like a hindrance instead of a reward as we have to laboriously move minis through them while I remove the fog. The Fog of War ...


2

Those players are ideal for secondary characters. One way is for their characters to be secondary PCs, who have a standing reason for not being around the party. Bart the Big is a mercenary caravan guard, but between jobs he stays with his traveling friends, with which faith always seems to gather him at funny moments. Christina is a young wizard ...


2

Tool to make reading a forum easier That would depend on the specific forum software, and would be better asked in uh 'super user' or one of the other stack exchanges relating to internet or computer use. Play by Post (Roleplaying in a Forum) The best forum to roleplay in that I have found is mythweavers.com. It has a forum software that allows each game ...


2

The truth is, most RPGs are suitable for playing on a forum. I've been playing D&D 5e over at Myth-weavers and rpol.net for a few months now. If you visit that site, you will find many RPGs being played, with free rules, few or no pictures etc. However, I've only really been playing dnd 4th and 5th edition on forums. 4th edition requires lots of maps ...


2

Playing tabletop online has been my primary way to do it for about five or six years now. The answers already posted address the specific problems of playing Shadowrun in IRC quite well, but I wanted to add some general points. You should try to get your players to use voice chat. I don't know if it's an issue of trust, shyness, or even just bad bandwidth ...


2

I have never played SR online. However, the situation is not much different at the table, the online-modifier to communication speed only makes it worse. Yes, Shadowrun is a system that's pretty detailed concerning combat and combat will take a lot of time per turn compared to other systems. Why? A character can easily have 3-4 actions of their own. Adding ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible