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26

Yes, use the actual rules now that you know them The game is balanced around the ruleset it assumes is in use, and as you've already noticed any change to the rules is going to have system-wide implications (in this case, some very significant ones). You'll find a lot of powers, items, feats, and design philosophies make more sense now. But allow massive ...


26

D&D is a consensus game - Discuss the Options Your problem is not unique - it happens to every game master with a new system. It even happens in board games. It also happens whenever there is errata - changing the "offical rules." But, you are playing with a group of people so you should discuss any rule changes with the rest - regardless of the the ...


24

In all cases, the Attack of Opportunity is resolved in the square in which the provoking action is performed. In the case of movement, the act of moving out of a threatened square is performed in the threatened square - other squares do not come into play until that part of movement has been resolved. This is not abundantly clear from the rules on Attacks ...


23

In fencing you are taught steps that allow you to engage or disengage from an opponent without offering an opening to your enemies blade. I have listed a few examples below: advance - the primary action for forward movement in fencing retreat - the primary action for backward movement in fencing disengage - the act of avoiding the opponent's blade without ...


23

According to third edition designer Skip Williams, in his article Attacks of Opportunity (Part One), D&D uses attacks of opportunity to add tactical complexity and danger, to discourage certain actions in combat without banning them outright, and to balance out useful or powerful combat manoevers: Skip Williams: The D&D game uses its attack ...


22

From Opportunity Action, Interrupts Target’s Action: An opportunity action takes place before the target finishes its action. After the opportunity attack, the creature resumes its action. If the target is reduced to 0 hit points or fewer by the opportunity attack, it can’t finish its action because it’s dead or dying. A normal OA will not interrupt ...


21

Why does Withdraw protect you? You're giving up both actions and move speed in order to leave the area safely. Withdraw lets you move at double your speed, but running lets you move even faster than that. So if you're just trying to get away as quickly as possible, a run would be a better action, but you can't defend yourself while going at your top speed. ...


18

In 4e, the overriding design philosophy is that "specific trumps general" from this, all else emerges. The general case is that Opportunity Actions trigger when: Trigger: Opportunity actions allow you to take an action in response to an enemy letting its guard down. The one type of opportunity action that every combatant can take is an opportunity ...


18

It's a full round action. Think of it like this: You are using the move action to move away, while using your standard action to pay attention to your surroundings, to make sure that no one can take advantage of the situation. You do not just run away and flee, you do not let your guard down. Instead, you retreat safely.


17

The characters provoke opportunity attacks as normal, however the creature who's turn it is does not get an opportunity attack against the readied action A readied actionDDI is an immediate reaction to the triggering action, and so in this case takes places during the creature's turn. Opportunity actions DDI cannot be taken during your own turn.


16

An opportunity attack is not a forced attack. It is an option. If the Defender can use an immediate action (i.e., it is not his turn, hasn't already used an immediate action this round), he can use Aegis of Ensnarement. Regardless of whether an attack is forced or not, an attack by a marked target provokes defender punishment. An attack is an attack is an ...


16

As a general rule, "An opportunity attack is a melee basic attack" (Compendium glossary), so this doesn't come up much. However, there are special cases: Ninth Legion Student [Lesser Style] lets you use Direct the Strike (ranged 5) "in place of a melee basic attack when making an opportunity attack." Now, both the Glossary entry for Ranged Attack and the ...


14

Opportunity attacks serve multiple purposes. They don't allow you to walk around the whole battlefield whenever you want. This is mostly useful to prevent the thief from always using the backstab attack on every round. By creating opportunity attacks, there comes a cost to a thief trying to always get behind someone. (or flanking in general) They ...


14

Phasing is a mode of movement (it is listed under the heading of "Movement Related Traits") which allows a creature to ... ignore difficult terrain and ... enter squares containing blocking terrain, obstacles, and enemy creatures. The creature follows normal rules for where it must end its movement.... Rules Compendium p. 208 A phasing creature is ...


13

From the Rules Compendium, p209 No Opportunity Actions Triggered: When a creature falls past an enemy, the creature does not trigger opportunity actions, such as opportunity attacks, from that enemy that are triggered by movement."


12

Yes, they stack Because they are different types of bonuses (racial, and untyped). Remember also that untyped bonuses always stack unless they come from the same game element. That is, if your halfling rogue is within 5 squares of an ArdentDDI ally with Wisdom 16 and the Mantle of Clarity feature, he takes an additional +3 (untyped) bonus to his AC against ...


12

First: consult The Rules of Hidden Club for a complete and comprehensive explanation of how stealth & hiding works in 4th Edition. You cannot simply become hidden from an enemy just by creating a diversion to hide. If the diversion is successful and my character enters stealth, while he was within threaten range of an enemy, and uses a move action ...


11

Yes. They can be performed during the same round and during the same turn. An Opportunity Attack is defined as: OPPORTUNITY ATTACK: OPPORTUNITY ACTION ... One per Combatant’s Turn: You can take only one opportunity action during another combatant’s turn, but you can take any number during a round. ... Interrupts Target’s Action: An ...


11

As Jonathan mentioned, the SRD is D&D 3.5, not 4e. You can force a creature to provoke with a few methods, here are the most common ones: Dominating a foe and having them move or use a ranged/area attack Placing a zone or other effect the encourages the foe to move on their own: The fighter attack becomes the "lesser" of the two consequences. A good ...


11

Ok, Let's examine the situation that would allow for this: A monster is moving past you, allowing for an opportunity attack, towards a square that is 2 square away from your current location. As he moves past you make your opportunity attack using fading strike and move into his intended destination. This is a legal move according to both the power and the ...


11

There's a few bits of rules to sift through here. These quotes are from the D&D Compendium. Direct the Strike provokes opportunity attacks Ranged and Area Powers Provoke: If an enemy adjacent to you uses a ranged power or an area power, you can make an opportunity attack against that enemy. Direct the Strike is a ranged power - you're targeting ...


11

Yes, it’s “free” Each person can only do it once per round, but every round if a mage casts within someone’s threatened range, he provokes from that person, who gets the Attack of Opportunity. This does not require a particular action, does not require any kind of preparation, and does not affect initiative. No, it does not allow ...


10

After the opportunity attack, the creature resumes its action. [Emphasis mine.] It doesn't say that the target gets to complete its action, only that it gets to resume it. However, now that the target is stunned (or, as you point out, dazed, if it has already taken another action), the action it was performing is now invalid, so upon resuming the action ...


10

Yes. Neither the rules for being prone (page 277), nor the rules for Opportunity Attacks (page 290) prevent prone combatants from making opportunity attacks. (both page numbers are for the fourth edition PHB.)


10

Opportunity attacks are interrupts triggered by attempting to leave an adjacent square "Leaving an adjacent square to enter another adjacent square" is just as much "leaving an adjacent square" as is "leaving an adjacent square to enter a non-adjacent square." It's not about leaving his reach entirely, it's about leaving a square he threatens. If I'm ...


10

The attack of opportunity occurs before the opponent leaves the square. Otherwise, it would be impossible to strike at an opponent who runs away from you (which is the most common case for attacks of opportunity, and the main case they're supposed to handle).


10

I was originally thinking it must be "no" to the first part, but after consulting the SRD to back that up, I think that I'll have to go with yes. Emphasis is mine: Readying an Action You can ready a standard action, a move action, or a free action. To do so, specify the action you will take and the conditions under which you will take it. ...


9

From the Rules Compendium pg 314: While phasing, a creature ignores difficult terrain, and it can enter squares containing enemies, blocking terrain, or other obstacles. The creature follows the normal rules for where it must end its movement (normally an unoccupied space). The rules for opportunity attacks are always stated pretty clearly so I would say ...


9

PHB1 on p290 goes into detail on opportunity attacks. As far as I read it, unless an attack that is being used for the opportunity attack specifically mentions that it stops the character, then they can continue moving. For example, the fighter's Combat Superiority ability reads An enemy struck by your opportunity attack stops moving, if a move provoked ...


9

From the SRD (italics mine) Making an Attack of Opportunity An attack of opportunity is a single melee attack, and a character can only make one per round. The character does not have to make an attack of opportunity if the character doesn't want to. The character makes the attack of opportunity at the character's normal base attack bonus. An ...



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