Hot answers tagged

51

I would probably have told him he couldn't do that. As an Organized Play DM, you're trying to make sure the entire table has fun; you are not required to indulge any single player if it causes problems for everyone else. So actually, I'd have made it a table discussion. Something like: "Hm. OK, I'm gonna be honest; that kind of bugs me, because Batman isn't ...


20

I would have laughed (not in mockery, but rather in amused interest). I would definitely allow him to wear it as long as the other players didn't strongly object. After all, part of the purpose of role-playing is to explore the idea of being a different person or behaving in a certain way. He wants to be Batman? Great! Let's explore that! How would people ...


17

Energy Put focus into roleplaying, even if you're watching someone else do it. Focus yourself on what they are saying and doing, even if it's kinda boring, and project your body language and voice while you're acting in-character. Be much less high-intensity when simply describing your bonuses while rolling, or asking someone to pass the chips. This will ...


16

A "Living" campaign is one of the old RPGA-run organized play campaigns designed for you to use and advance a character across multiple play opportunities at public events like RPG conventions and game days, in the same shared world and using officially sanctioned adventures. (For you kids nowadays, the RPGA was a RPG fan organization sponsored by TSR, ...


16

Organized Play. D&D Adventurers League is an "organized play" system. Playing Local stores host games (often with volunteer DMs, sometimes with paid ones). Players play point-build or array-build characters in whatever adventure is being run. Character's experience total is tracked, and players can drop-in/drop-out on a session by session basis. ...


14

I'd let it ride ("Ranger with thrown weapons who fights evil because his parents died" is a perfectly legit background, after all) unless and until the joke stops being funny. This is defined as "people aren't laughing, and it's starting to become irritating". At that point I'd simply mention that the joke was funny, it's done, time to pay a bit more ...


14

The RPGA is what D&D Organized Play used to be called, and is the oldest/largest organization of the sort, started by Frank Mentzer in 1980. Like the newer Pathfinder Society, it organized games at conventions and other venues and sponsored various ongoing public campaigns. I started an RPGA-affiliated gaming club in Memphis, TN in 1999 (the FORGE) and ...


12

Poor* *This only applies to their starting lifestyle for adventurer league play. For a home game you can let them start with whatever they want. It's important to remember that adventurer's league is a specific interpretation of the rules for organized play. More importantly though, this gets at how downtime works in Adv League. Downtime days in Adv ...


11

"Living campaign" is a common term for a "shared-universe" campaign played by an extended community of participants, usually mediated by an organization like the RPGA. The idea is that players from all over the world can participate in the evolution of a shared setting, either developing organically based on an aggregate of player actions or pre-determined ...


6

In short, yes. I first met Noah Antwiler back in Gilbert, AZ when he was running games at an old game store there called Waterloo Games. He was a cheeky young teenager who thought he knew all the time what was fair for everyone. I met a guy years later, named John Smith (not an alias) who changed a module because he hadn't bothered to read it before ...


6

If it isn't damageable to the game, and he manages to come with a clear background for his character, I don't see why you shouldn't do anything about it. He can do a Batman-clone, as long as it's justified and he provides you with reasons, and a real background story. On the other hand, if he refuses to explain his character anymore and just want to "be ...


6

A DM gets (300 XP + 150 gp) x (tier of play) per episode, where the tiers of play are as defined on PHB p.15. Note that episode is not a play-session: it's a "part or chapter" of the published adventure. You can find this rule in Section 2 of the Adventurer's League Player's Guide; it's p.13 in the season 3 version linked.


6

Set a good example This is almost too obvious to mention, but people will be more likely to roleplay if there's someone at the table who's doing it well. In particular: roleplaying should be fun for everyone. Some people, especially people new to roleplaying, roleplay by saying things like: "I'm a greedy backstabbing rogue, so I'm roleplaying by stealing ...


6

how does Adventurer's League work? First off, it's not really a "massive multiplayer" in the sense that you may be using that term. It's (usually) better-described as a "massive parallel-player." 3 Models Encounters form a many-month storyline designed to bring characters from first level to 20th. Encounters run on Wednesday evenings. Think of this like ...


5

Applaud If someone does anything that looks like roleplaying, show some excitement. The better the roleplaying, the more excitement it deserves. Most people like praise and attention, so it will help them feel more comfortable the next time they get the urge. Don't push it too hard, but if you think you should use a certain amount of encouragement, kick it ...


5

I would make sure one of the villains they have to deal with had horrible scaring on one side of his face, and was chronically indecisive to the point where he used a simple augury every time he had a decision to make. But that only works if you're running that sort of game.


5

I'd ask the rest of the group and the organizer if they were OK with it; if universally yes, run with it. If no, ask him to drop the shtick as disruptive. If I can do so without mangling the adventure, I'd even reskin one of the villains to be a traditional batman enemy. Joke names and stupid shticks are traditional but not always approved of, with some ...


5

Based on the Twitter conversation between Mike Mearls, the Lead Manager for D&D R&D and others the following issues become clear. At Home DMs will be able to run the same adventures as those being run at stores and conventions. However, they will be slightly modified and will not receive as many of the resources, such as maps, tokens, or most ...


3

Pathfinder: There are a number of pregen characters at various levels you can use. Any player-created characters must begin at level 1. Related question: Is it possible to start with non 1st level character in Pathfinder Society Organized Play? D&D (5e encounters): It looks like each adventure has pregen characters for it. Pregenerated PCs are ...


3

In a living campaign, your character is imersed into a 'world' with other players you don't know. All activity is posted to a central location, so changes in that world affect everyone who play the game. It also allows you to use one character with different DM/GMs using the same campaign. Essentially it turns table-top gaming as close as possible to being ...


2

Train or find a group of like-minded roleplayers It is very, very difficult to change an established game culture without everyone on board. The game master often has more possibilities, but even then, it is difficult. Depending on how regular the attendance is, you would need to always start from beginning at every session, which will only lead to burn-out....


2

For Pathfinder Society there are Pre-Gens you can use that cover most level ranges: http://paizo.com/download/pathfinder/PFS-Pregens.zip (There should be copies at the CON) For Shadow Run you can use the Pregenerated Sample PCs in the 5e Quick Start: http://cdn.shadowruntabletop.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/E-CAT27QSR_SR5-Quick-Start-Rules.pdf For DnD ...


2

I can only speak from experience and not any specific reference to any of the other game system leagues official or otherwise apart from D&D 4th Edition. I have done this a few times with a group of 4e gamers. They play modules in chapters, and welcome one-time players to join with their ongoing party. I made a character to match the levels they were ...


2

I have been playing the various 4e Organised Play programs at a local independent gaming store here in Australia. The support for the last couple of Encounters seasons has been much less than before, but the support was still there in limited form. The support for RPGA/Living Forgotten Realms has been non-existent for at least 12 months. I am told by the ...


2

When presented with a character that just goes clunk with me I will tell the PC, gently, that I have certain vision of the game and I can't see including the character without ruining my fun as the GM. Gaming is cooperative story telling and everyone should have fun (most of the time). The GM as much, or more than the party as the GM has to work way harder ...


2

Aw that's kinda cool. If the character was just dressing in a bat-themed outfit and throwing bat-shaped shurikens, I would totally encourage it, Dark Sun or not. If the player said his PC's real name was "Bruce Wayne" I'd probably be kind of annoyed with it, but as long as everyone else was cool, I wouldn't sweat it. I've seen worse at organized play, and ...


2

I would roll with the punches thrown by the Ranger/Batman, and encourage the player to try something different for the next session. But if the session went well, and everyone enjoyed it, I might encourage players to reskin other Comic Book Characters just to give it a try.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible