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62

They did however love it and want to continue next week. I am afraid you have answered your own question. The first rule of playing RPGs (or anything) is to have fun, so just make sure you also have your share of it. Now, you are new players, so it is obvious you are going to spend time learning the system, learning how to play with each other, ...


25

To answer the primary point first: Sounds like you did a good GMing job, especially for a first time. The most important question is the one you answer yourself: Did your players have fun? (And the matching question, did you have fun?) If everyone's having fun then by definition you're all doing it right. With that said, some analysis of your more ...


14

4e is modeled on approximately 10 encounters/level. So if you are playing 2 encounters/session then you will level approximately once every 2.5 months. The experience point numbers in the game are built so that characters complete eight to ten encounters for every level they gain. In practice, that’s six to eight encounters, one major quest, and ...


13

Being in quarantine means scarcity, but to emphasise desperation it has to be brought home by giving the players hard choices: There's only two doses of drug X and three patients need it or they'll die. Who do they save? There's time and competent people enough to either fix the air filtration system for Ward 6 or to keep the diagnostics lab running for ...


6

I don't believe that there are some hard and fast rules about this. It's too much dependent on the situation, the context and the state of the players. But there are some ways that you can use in order to be better at spotting those "dead-meat" scenes. Know the genre you're working with No matter what game you are playing, it will fall to a certain genre. ...


6

Rashomon is one of my favorite movies, and it has several different themes worth exploring which are cross-genre. Here are a few tips to consider - Have the focus of the adventure involve multiple, self serving participants. In the movie, you had observers who are also participants (one way or the other), but not only that. Most benefited (except maybe for ...


6

"Am I doing something wrong or is this just how it goes when you're learning?" It goes exactly like that. If your question was "What are some of your greatest GMing failures" I could regail you with some real whoppers, but I digress. It may help you feel better about the work you've done if you define some goals. Popular goals may include: Having ...


5

It may seem slow now, but you can't necessarily take the numbers from two battles and extrapolate them that far out. A couple things to consider: Skill Challenges and/or social encounters give a much higher experience-per-hour rate than combat encounters. You don't always have to fight! Just last night our group used a ritual to create a good disguise, ...


4

Here's a little tidbit that Microscope taught me: every scene has a particular question (or questions) associated with it. When that question is answered, the scene is over. You want to skip over scenes with questions that are uninteresting, and jump to the ones which are interesting, and that's exactly what you did. This is why nobody runs games with ...


4

If they are ill, or they are caring for patients, quarantine means scarcity. The clotting drugs they need to keep the failing splenectomy in Trauma-A alive are not available and he's crashing. The last cylinder of O2 is about to run out for the old lady with ARDS. Scarcity can also come in the form of information - nobody on the outside is telling them ...


3

I think an obvious answer is a metronome. This will LITERALLY increase the heartbeat of your player subconsciously. If you explain it away as something ticking in game(clock, gear, etc.), then they wont even think it is corny. A second, more precarious idea, is fire. If you can work a flammable object into the plot, and burn a prop version IRL, they will ...


3

My advice is: bring a hat. I just remember reading something about using rakugo style props, as a GM. I think it was in Instant GM, a bag of tricks. So the players are going to see a story unfold, or interact with different characters who saw a story unfold who each have their own point of view. In order to easily make the NPCs stand out, just wear the ...


3

This is the complaint I've seen from a house mate of mine with more experience at 4E, even with experienced players. They're solution was to give monsters 1/3 HP and make monsters to 3x damage. That, he said made everything much faster and bearable. Your mileage may vary however. One of the things I'm going to do if I run/play again is make 'power' cards ...


3

I would like to give you a slightly different answer (at least from the others you received). They are not wrong, but in my opinion the whole thing can be seen from another point of view. You said: They did however love it and want to continue next week. Someone said that this is the answer to your question… but I have to disagree. Being a GM is ...


2

In short: No, you did a fine job! About Character Creation: Character creation is notoriously long in most RPGs. I've spent entire evenings where we didn't even finish creating all our characters in time to game before everyone had to leave. Don't worry, it's normal. In time, when everyone knows the rules, character creation will be much faster. Planning a ...


2

I don't know if this applies to you, but it really annoys me when people play D&D for levels. If you want 'Level 30' written on your character sheet, just do it right now. Poof, you get +20 to every roll! But now all the DC's are increased by 20. All the monsters are bigger, the poisons stronger, and the traps harder to disarm. Sure, you can sneeze and ...


2

When my group tried to play 4e we had the same problem. It took us three game sessions of 5 to 7 hours each just to get through the first small dungeon! Things did speed up later once players were more comfortable with how the combat system worked and also were not looking up their powers constantly. However, I still thought the combat was too slow for my ...


2

Start killing NPC's one at a time with the deaths becoming progressively more unpleasant. Make the difficulty of keeping patients alive progressively more difficult the longer it takes to come up with a cure. For each unit of time increase difficulty by 5% - 10% Give hints that the people outside of the quarantine don't have much hope for the situation. ...


2

The story ideas are good, but I think you might want one or two stacks of tokens to really make it clear to the players that their characters are running out of stuff, perhaps health tokens or medicine tokens. As long as they have all 20 health tokens they're fine, but when they get down to 15, they show the first symptoms, etc. You could even take away ...


2

Tangibles - maybe you can measure pacing better if you tightly structure scenes. Let the event structure be a creative constraint, and write each on an index card. So: MEET THE TAILOR, A FIGHT IN THE ALLEYS, TAILOR'S DAUGHTER RETURNS, HORSE TRADING, THE BIG REVEAL, CLIFFHANGER Or whatever. They need not be linear or even mandatory, but having your outline ...


2

The way I achieve this in my campaign is through manipulation of the players. I can do this because I tie the character into the my setting background through a one on one session prior to the start the campaign. We go back and back forth with the players telling me what they like and me telling them how it could fit in the campaign. The results is a short ...


2

Since you had fun, you obviously didn't do badly. ;> I take exception to one nearly unanimous comment from the other posters. If simply making characters for a First Game takes 90 minutes, there's something wrong. (And I find the complacency about that to be shocking.) In the many games I've run for first-timers, I hand out premade characters and we start ...


1

On SAS (Storytelling Adventure System) format of World of Darkness (and other games) adventures scenes are structured with the following fields: Challenge Overview Description Storyteller goals Player goals Actions Consequences Storyteller goals are what the Storyteller (or adventure writer) intend to achieve with the scene. Can be the presentation of a ...


1

Not discussing other classic serial tropes like keeping the villain's identity secret and just addressing pacing - what you want, I assume, is for each session to be like a single chapter of a serial, with a specific self-contained plot semi-resolved but ending with a cliffhanger as part of a larger plot. You have the advantage over traditional media in ...



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