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73

The biggest issue with paladins is when their partners' behavior is judged as if the paladin himself had done the deed. If your DM is willing to avoid that pitfall, may I suggest... A paladin who does not expect non-believers to obey the laws of his faith. He hopes that through his shining example his teammates will come to see the value of his code, but ...


34

Paladin as an Example Consider this story from the Giant in the Playground forum: Due to setting off a trap, my paladin/crusader and some his comrades were trapped in a solid wall of force that was filling up with a mist that was causing us drowning checks. Our DM was being nice and making it a flat DC 16 fort check instead of a steadily rising con ...


32

Since Gary Gygax was the original "designer" let's look at what inspired his version and hence D&D's version of the Paladin. This is from a Collection of "Sources for D&D" that was compiled by Aardy R. DeVarque, who draws his source directly from the original 1st edition Dungeon Masters Guide. Paladin Class Based largely on the character of ...


27

I think the first thing to do is break the link between "paladin" and "knight". It's the classic formulation, but that's because the original paladin's image is based on medieval knights fighting in the name of Christianity. But take an LG deity in your campaign setting, and try to build the paladin in his image. You tagged your question Pathfinder, so I ...


24

You cannot use attack powers from other classes while in beast form. From PHB2, p84 (as updated by official errata): Wild Shape ... While you are in beast form, you can’t use weapon or implement attack powers that lack the beast form keyword, although you can sustain such powers. ... No paladin powers (or powers from any other non-druid class, ...


22

Smite damage is not precision damage, and since it is extra points not extra dice of damage, it is definitely multiplied. The only things not multiplied on crits are extra dice of damage, such as precision damage or weapon effects like flaming.


22

You should read up on Hellknights more. They are the epitome of law - but there are LE, LN, and LG Hellknights. To quote, Regardless of their severity, Hellknights are not an evil group. Although there are doubtlessly numerous evil members—particularly among the upper echelons of power—the majority of the orders are impartial arbiters and enforcers of ...


21

By the far the best gamable description of a paladin I seen was given by Elisabeth Moon in her Deed of Paksenarrion series. Paraphrased From page 579 of the Trade Paperback the Deed of Paksenarrion. Most think being a holy warrior means gaining vast arcane powers, that they would be nearly invincible against any foe. But truth is that while Paladin ...


21

A Radically Different Idea Your player had fun playing a greedy awesomedwarf? And now isn't having fun playing a Stop Right There! Paladin? Easy. Have him take that in-character. Whoa, whoa, what are you talking about? Simple. Have the paladin start to be dissatisfied with the course he's taking. Have him start bucking authority, becoming a ...


17

There are no solutions for you At least, not for Paladin. If you want to combine magic and melee with a faith-based character I can suggest a highly pious Magus, but Paladin's not going to work out for a lot of reasons. See below: None of your abilities care about Intelligence - And there's no archetypes or prestige classes that are Paladin-friendly to ...


16

From the Core rules pdf (pg 60): Detect Evil (Sp): At will, a paladin can use detect evil, as the spell. A paladin can, as a move action, concentrate on a single item or individual within 60 feet and determine if it is evil, learning the strength of its aura as if having studied it for 3 rounds. While focusing on one individual or object, the ...


16

You and @KRyan are correct. all multipliers work alike (crit, lance, brace, whatever) everything is included in the multiplier except bonus dice multipliers are additive not multiplicative, see Multiplying Damage in the SRD. It doesn't say anything more about it because there's nothing more to say, the rule is simple and all-encompassing. Your math is ...


13

You have a few options, basically, depending on your style of DMing, setting, meanness, desired player reaction, and plot-appropriateness. 1: Narrative Just tell the player that he feels his chosen deity turn their back on him, an overwhelming sense of guilt or doubt stops him calling on it, or something to that effect. You may do it immediately after he ...


12

I'll take a crack at answering the first question. (I'll do it with Pathfinder, since I'm more familiar with it, but it should be about the same for 3.5e). I'd estimate he'd need to be at minimum 12th level to handle that encounter. The easiest way to do that is calculate the CR of the encounter you're proposing. Let's assume you've got 2 of the Giants ...


12

Since you're asking for story research purposes, I'll answer primarily with that framework in mind. (Some of the D&D technical detail will be skipped in favour of plot-relevant information.) So, the most important part of the answer first: It depends hugely on who's running the game. D&D, like most roleplaying games, is run by a game master ...


12

NO. Quote from Pathfinder SRD: Whenever the paladin uses lay on hands to heal damage to one target, the target also receives the additional effects from all of the mercies possessed by the paladin. Using lay on hands to channel energy is clearly not the case.


11

Warn the player before they have their character take an action that would contravene their character's in-game belief system to drastic effect. In fiction, the character would know that an action would have consequence, so it's only fair that you as DM relate that to the player. The player should know what they're getting into, not stumble upon it. Only ...


11

The description on page 60 of the core rules suggests that it does both. At will, you can detect evil as per the spell. As a move action, you can concentrate on a single item or individual and learn the strength of its aura immediately as if you had studied it under detect evil for three rounds. While doing this, you don't detect evil on anything else in ...


11

Despite their functional and naming similarities, Divine Challenge and Divine Sanction are quite different. Divine Challenge is a Paladin class power, minor action, close burst 5, that allows the Paladin to mark an enemy. The mark lasts until this power is used again. The Paladin must engage this target by attacking the target or ending his or her turn ...


11

In 4e divine power doesn't come with all the alignment constraints it had in prior editions; gods rarely involve themselves in the mortal plane, especially to empower/disempower individuals. If a follower of a god turns against their tenets (such as a servant of Pelor becoming unaligned or even evil), the god won't (can't?) just cut off the character's ...


11

Simple: he is a true believer of the true Pelor, The Burning Hate. It’s just fanon, but it’s a pretty fun one. Might make for a really cool character, and a very interesting plot hook. Depends whether or not you had important plans that hinged on Pelor being as described in the books.


10

According to a previous entry in the Wizards PHB FAQ, the enemy attack would damage the party member before it died to the Divine Sanction damage: 40. When does the damage from divine challenge occur? If it’s enough to kill the monster making the attack does his attack still happen? Yes. The damage is in response to the marked creature's attack; ...


10

Yes. The only indication of what the bond applies to is this: The first type of bond allows the paladin to enhance her weapon as a standard action by calling upon the aid of a celestial spirit for 1 minute per paladin level. Nowhere does it indicate that the weapon must be designated ahead of time. More importantly, no provision is given for ...


10

First and foremost, that bodak's mount doesn't look like it is a special mount or fiendish servant or something. Just a cool construct, bound to him by a property of the construct, not by a class feature or feat. As for special mounts, let's take a look what DMG says. PALADIN COHORT MOUNTS At the DM’s option, she may allow a paladin or other ...


10

In 2E (and maybe 1E - not sure, I don't have the books handy at the moment), the Paladin is specifically a specialist Fighter, much like how the Druid was an "example" of a specialist Cleric. The paladin is also less defined by his religion (not just a holy warrior) and his alignment, and more defined by his required code of conduct. Alignment is a ...


9

I don't think the evil nature of the spell is too much of a problem. It should add conflict to the party for sure - the Paladin should oppose evil acts. Habitual, unrepentant use of evil necromancy may eventually drive a wedge between the characters and split the party. More immediately, the paladin may feel obligated to seek legal recourse on behalf of ...


9

Divine sanction (and other status effects) aren't optional unless the phrasing clearly indicates they are. If the power says "... and the target is subject to your divine sanction," then your divine sanction gets applied whether you want it to or not. If the power says something more like "... and you may apply your divine sanction to the target" then you ...


9

Not by RAW, no Though the Channel Energy ability consumes uses of Lay on Hands, it is not Lay on Hands. As a result, the bracers do not affect Channel Energy directly. However, they will still grant additional uses of Lay on Hands, which you're free to spend howsoever you wish (such as, say, by fueling Channel Energy).


8

If you're playing 1e, then this is completely up to the DM to announce whether the Paladin's God would judge the Paladin for permissiveness or tolerance. Like others here, I would definitely think alot of this has to do with the God of the Paladin. More importantly, and bluntly, it would depend on the player playing the paladin. If that player insists it ...


8

Ignore the Code entirely as the stupid, archaic, and terrible design it is, and treat Falling as a purely narrative construct when a character truly and intentionally abandons his cause. When a character does Fall, replace his powers immediately with those of a Paladin of Slaughter or Tyranny as appropriate. Leaving a character crippled derails the story, ...



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