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6

The Draconomicon says Only a lawful good dragon should be allowed to serve as a paladin’s special mount. The dragonnel (see Chapter 4) is a special exception to this guideline. It also says A paladin who wishes to be able to summon a dragon special mount must select the Dragon Steed feat (see page 105). The paladin must choose a dragon ...


1

As far as the specific case of the Oath of Vengeance, I would rule that the 'greater evil' is subjective to the character. The descriptions of the Oath of Vengeance state that the oath is sworn to defeat a specific enemy. The further descriptions depict the target of vengeance to be the great evil that the paladin is attempting to thwart. The way it is ...


1

The rules for paladins summoning their mounts from somewhere else have been written later than the Draconomicon. When the draconomicon came out, mounts always resided on the same plane of the paladin and did never get portaled in. The descriptions in the Draconomicon reflect that status. How to reconcile that is something the DM and the group should aree ...


1

The feat doesn't specify where the Dragonnel (or a Dragon, if chosen) actually comes from, and the flavor text for Dragonnel only states that: In the wild, dragonnels typically lair in hidden caves located far from civilization So there are two possible answers to where the creature comes from (and your DM should decide which one applies): You pay ...


16

Well, if it is a dragon dragon (not some goofball wannabe), a powerful, intelligent being that doesn't tend to be friendly to humanoids and other pests, a more important factor than the amount of gold would be simply respect. For a dragon to be feel treated with respect, providing a massive hoard and a comfy lair is a good start. If the dragon is treated ...


6

I think feats should have precedence on what it's written on the PHB. The feat says that the dragonnel replace your special mount. I read it as "your special mount is no longer the creature that is specified by the rules in the PHB", thus it is no longer summoned from the celestial realms. So I'm inclined toward your first interpretation: the paladin no ...


4

Figuring out the answer to your question has to start with examining the intent of the authors of D&D 5e. When we look at the paladin one of the first statements we find is this. Whatever their origin and their mission, paladins are united by their oaths to stand against the forces o f evil. The author then go on to explain that paladin uphold a ...


5

Where the steed is summoned from would be up to your DM but the rules seem to lean toward it residing in the material plane in its lair and being summoned from there. It could easily be swung that the steed resides in the Celestial Realm and you give it treasure to take to its lair when you summon it. When you take a draconic steed you must provide it with ...


-2

Through all the D&D's, alignment has never been an abstract philosophical concept. It has always been real in a way that it affects the real world. Being evil is no shrouded more-or-less psychatric expertise but a property of (un)living beings just like their height, weight or haircolor. It can change, but it's always clear cut. Your evil flag is either ...


1

In earlier versions a paladin could be a paladin of pretty much anything he believed in, be it a god, a set moral code, a vague concept like 'justice', what have you. As long as it falls under "living by a code" and "believing in something" it was fine for a paladin. The exact contents did not matter so much. If it is not stated clearly in 5E, I'd say ...


28

There is no mechanical or fluff requirement for a Paladin to follow a god. You've quoted the most relevant paragraph yourself, but for a backup, from the same page: Whether sworn before a god's altar and the witness of a priest, in a sacred glade before nature spirits and fey beings, or in a moment of desperation and grief with the dead as the only ...



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