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45

The short answer is, “Yes, it is possible.” That’s an almost-meaningless answer, though, because just about anything is possible in a Dungeons and Dragons game, if your DM/group goes for it. The rules are fairly flexible, and on top of that, the DM is free to change, add to, remove from, or ignore the rules as he or she sees fit (and, ...


44

When I've played (or joined in others playing) these quiet characters, the best way to run them is have an almost noir style internal monologue. "I looked at the wall, and frowned. I wasn't certain, but there might be something behind it. Best not to mention it though, I'd look like a chump if I was wrong." is much more interesting than. "..." ...


21

Use out-of-character discussion to let the other players know you're engaged and not bored. This is more important in online gaming because you don't have any body language, eye contact, or other social cues to work with. In particular, tell them that you're playing a loner. Engage with the group in-character privately, when NPCs aren't around. Keep your ...


21

While some groups may accept an authoritarian structure, my experience has been that, for most groups, it is better to recognize that, even though one character is in charge in-game, all of the players are still equal out-of-game. So you and I would still be able to discuss plans or decisions out of game, even if my character must obey your character ...


13

I have extensive experience with this style, having been the GM, "party leader", and under a "party leader". I will describe the situation where the "party leader" player makes real game decisions for the group. We first came to the idea of having party leaders as a way of managing large games. It can be extremely difficult for a group of 12+ players to ...


12

It depends While a single player controlling (and creating) every PC has an advantage in coherence and synergy (if they're going for optimization), keep in mind that they will be the only player at the table, too. This means there is only one brain to think of everything, from tactics to remembering details of the story. If you still want medium to heavy ...


10

There are a couple of the classic "Campaign Archetypes" (a topic for an essay?) that I think may work. First is: The Deadly Peril Something is out to get the PCs, something bigger than them. You need to make it very, very clear that they cannot survive without working together. Problem is, when one of them inevietably goes off on their own. To keep the ...


9

There's two ways to make the loner character work in an rpg. First, descriptively. Constantly narrate HOW you do things, the gestures, the attitude that comes across in your actions, along with the internal monologue. (Brian Ballsun-Stanton's answer is very good about this). Second, have small conversations instead of big ones Get aside with another PC ...


7

Ultimately, this is no different from a group of people who have the same level of system mastery and good (OK, great) communication skills, but something like a quarter of the time to spend working on and getting to know each character. From a balance perspective, it doesn’t really change anything; any group could (conceivably) have walked in with the same ...


7

Anything is possible. Not everything is a good idea. When one player character betrays the rest of the party, it almost always ends the campaign. Sometimes it just ends the character. If you don't want to end the campaign, or your character, but you really want to do this, consider the following options: Talk to the GM about making your character an NPC ...


7

First of all, there's a huge difference between being the leader of the characters' party and being the leader of the players. In your question and in your answer, it seems that you've mixed them. As such is the case, I will try to address both subjects in my answer, but I'll be far happier to know on which one I shall focus. For this answer, table level ...


6

Rogue Trader is one of those settings where this kind of question is quite fundamental to how you run your campaign. I am actually GMing a long-term Rogue Trader campaign myself and although I have 7 regular players, I still have several key roles that remain unfilled by players (Void Master being the notable one). In my case, I decided to quite extensively ...


6

My good and bad expriences Our most successful game were that in which we had a weak leadership. The leader was still leader nominally, but most decisions were still made on consensus. The leader had final word on all matters, but most of the time she didn't use it. She also draw red lines, but on those contours we had plenty of freedom. I had also been ...


5

I think you should ask your players what kind of game they want. Do they want to kill other player characters? In the game world, werewolves hate vampires. Vampires hate werewolves, and eat humans. Hunters hunt vampires and werewolves. Not sure about changelings, but basically you're setting up a big bloodbath. If this is what the players want, then be ...


5

Figure out what works for your players. Don't ask us how to make it work—ask them how to make it work. You see a problem that you think you need a leader for—do they see the same problem? Do they see the same solution? Or will they come up with a solution that you might not have come up with? It really is dependent upon the players how it ...


5

Is it possible? Yes. It's a role-playing game. There are no rules against it, so unless the DM says no, you can do it. Is it a good idea? Usually not. The most immediate reason is that players tend very strongly to take things like this personally. This is technically a violation of IC/OOC separation, but it is almost impossible to avoid, especially when ...


4

We ran a campaign with 6 people, and back stabbing was a part of the storyline almost the entire time. It got to the point where if you wanted to back stab someone, or become a part of the plot, all you had to do was ask the DM. So from my point of view and experience, it is never considered an 'unfun' thing. It is entirely up to how the DM wishes to play it ...


3

If you want to, talking directly to your players is a good idea in this scenario. Like: Listen, if I were a grand GM I probably would find a way to form this group even though you don't seem like you want to. But, I'm not yet, so you can continue getting plotted around each other until I get bored or take the bait and follow the plot. If you don't ...


3

Concept Restrictions As others have mentioned, making the characters from the beginning have to be part of a team is a simple rule. I usually like to define what kind of protagonists fit in this game world - what define "heroic" and general expectations. In some games, stealing and assassination are valid, in other games, the heroes are expected to keep ...


2

Creating an good enough party can be a bottom-up process, but a great party is allways top-dow. Pick two players, one should know the system intimately, let us call him the Strategist, the other should know the fellow players, he is the Nurse. The Strategist must know not only the rules, but also most of the class guides: ...


2

Games are a great way to teach complex subjects. Have you considered using a setting where the player characters are in a hierarchical organization? I learned how to handle this as a GM and player from playing FASA Star Trek and Twilight 2000. In Star Trek, sometimes I would play as a Captain and lead the Crew on a mission and other times I'd play as a ...


2

I've been thinking about this question a fair bit and feel that, for me, the answer to this question has three constituent parts: party leadership, player leadership and how to make it work. Party Leadership In-game leadership (aka leadership of the party) is the most common form of RPG leadership and the type I most like to see in games. Party leadership ...


2

Yes, certainly it is. One way that you can integrate this into your story in a controlled manner (i.e. in a way you as DM can manage) is to give each character a secret mission from the outset that they have to play towards without revealing to the rest of the party. For example, let's say you're off exploring an ancient tomb (a simple beginner's scenario), ...


2

I have played a similar game to this, I played an awakened zombie, we had a werewolf, a highlander, a vampire and a magi. Why did we stick together? Because we didn't know who else to turn to and everyone was against us. The organisational parts of WoD were, however, very downplayed. The society of each of the "species" of supernaturals was kept at a ...


2

I really feel this point needs to be made, if people disagree I will take the down-votes. I feel is answer is necessary because many future readers might get the (incorrect) impression that mixing templates in WoD is a great idea. It isn't. It is cool in other systems (DFRPG, for example) but it isn't here, and this is why and here is my recommendations. I ...


1

First of all, I think that the other answers are fantastic. That said I'd just like to complement them with my own thoughts on the topic. (I'm going to paint a picture of a supportive introvert for the rogue in hopes of better communicating certain points. Remove supportive introvert and insert whatever motive you have for your character.) Just because your ...


1

Playing the quiet type: Describe your actions and reactions, even if you have nothing to say. If you do have something to say, your conversations ought to get directly to the point. Know what your point is before you start the conversation, get to the point and be done with it. Though, I have to say, that's kind of boring. Playing the loner: If your ...


1

Possible? Yes. Fun? Probably not unless you can do it right. I once DMed a game that I would describe as semi-coperative, the players all were given a major objective, but they all came from different backgrounds and had different (and often conflicting) minor goals or preferred methods/outcomes. There was a pretty decent amount of lying, backstabbing, ...


1

I find that a related problem is that players are a lot smarter than their characters. They will also take 15 minutes in Real Life to debate whether to open the chest. And so you have to decide: are you playing to min/max and get the loot or are you there to focus on fun and roleplaying? (Neither is right nor wrong, but I find when it comes to Monty ...



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