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4

I think you should ask your players what kind of game they want. Do they want to kill other player characters? In the game world, werewolves hate vampires. Vampires hate werewolves, and eat humans. Hunters hunt vampires and werewolves. Not sure about changelings, but basically you're setting up a big bloodbath. If this is what the players want, then be ...


2

I have played a similar game to this, I played an awakened zombie, we had a werewolf, a highlander, a vampire and a magi. Why did we stick together? Because we didn't know who else to turn to and everyone was against us. The organisational parts of WoD were, however, very downplayed. The society of each of the "species" of supernaturals was kept at a ...


2

I really feel this point needs to be made, if people disagree I will take the down-votes. I feel is answer is necessary because many future readers might get the (incorrect) impression that mixing templates in WoD is a great idea. It isn't. It is cool in other systems (DFRPG, for example) but it isn't here, and this is why and here is my recommendations. I ...


3

If you want to, talking directly to your players is a good idea in this scenario. Like: Listen, if I were a grand GM I probably would find a way to form this group even though you don't seem like you want to. But, I'm not yet, so you can continue getting plotted around each other until I get bored or take the bait and follow the plot. If you don't ...


8

There are a couple of the classic "Campaign Archetypes" (a topic for an essay?) that I think may work. First is: The Deadly Peril Something is out to get the PCs, something bigger than them. You need to make it very, very clear that they cannot survive without working together. Problem is, when one of them inevietably goes off on their own. To keep the ...


1

First of all, I think that the other answers are fantastic. That said I'd just like to complement them with my own thoughts on the topic. (I'm going to paint a picture of a supportive introvert for the rogue in hopes of better communicating certain points. Remove supportive introvert and insert whatever motive you have for your character.) Just because your ...


0

Your character must be a loner for a reason. e.g. Brooding characters have a history of being confronted with social interactions in which they got the short end of the stick. Try to have your character engage in one-on-one conversations with other PCs because that's when they feel they have more control of the situation. At Roll20.net, there are often lulls ...


1

Playing the quiet type: Describe your actions and reactions, even if you have nothing to say. If you do have something to say, your conversations ought to get directly to the point. Know what your point is before you start the conversation, get to the point and be done with it. Though, I have to say, that's kind of boring. Playing the loner: If your ...


9

There's two ways to make the loner character work in an rpg. First, descriptively. Constantly narrate HOW you do things, the gestures, the attitude that comes across in your actions, along with the internal monologue. (Brian Ballsun-Stanton's answer is very good about this). Second, have small conversations instead of big ones Get aside with another PC ...


21

Use out-of-character discussion to let the other players know you're engaged and not bored. This is more important in online gaming because you don't have any body language, eye contact, or other social cues to work with. In particular, tell them that you're playing a loner. Engage with the group in-character privately, when NPCs aren't around. Keep your ...


44

When I've played (or joined in others playing) these quiet characters, the best way to run them is have an almost noir style internal monologue. "I looked at the wall, and frowned. I wasn't certain, but there might be something behind it. Best not to mention it though, I'd look like a chump if I was wrong." is much more interesting than. "..." ...


0

Depends on the betrayal I suppose. We had a halfling thief who stole from the party at every opportunity. As a player I knew, but they made sure it was never clear to the characters that this was happening. They filched treasure before we even knew we found it. Anything good, easily hid-able vanished before we even knew it was there. They were kind enough ...


5

Is it possible? Yes. It's a role-playing game. There are no rules against it, so unless the DM says no, you can do it. Is it a good idea? Usually not. The most immediate reason is that players tend very strongly to take things like this personally. This is technically a violation of IC/OOC separation, but it is almost impossible to avoid, especially when ...



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