New answers tagged

1

As this is about the characters, not the players, let it play out as it naturally would: Have both groups continue to run into difficult encounters designed for three PCs as planned originally, and use the story to show the characters that they need each other to stay alive, even if they hate each other. This is along the lines of Sam and Gollum both ...


3

There are many different ways to handle it, especially in Warcraft. Inter-faction team-ups happen fairly often in the later lore, and those are a good basis to having a party made up from different races. They fought together, one saved the life of the other etc. There are a lot of possibilities of making the characters susceptible to mixed party. It might ...


4

In Warcraft III, the delineation between the races was not as strong as it was in World of Warcraft. I personally found that more interesting (I was disappointed that after Warcraft III finally injected some shades of gray into the series, World of Warcraft went right back to Orcs & Humans). I therefore suggest that your campaign world not be as black-...


0

Well, to get the party together there will always be some kind of common goal, most notably The enemy of my enemy is my friend In case the characters of both parties can understand each other, there is always the chance of them realizing their factions mistake in judgement. This is commonly used as a trope in many stories regardless of genre. Some ...


0

My premise is, that the group is essential to the fun and usually everybody knows that. So it is expected of the GM to help the group overcome problems caused by correct role play of the characters and unite. Incorrect role play should not be allowed, much less when leading to splits. My General idea My concept isn't rocket science, but It may help to ...


4

If the character that split off is still following the main quest line, then there's every reason for them to keep running into each other repeatedly. Just keep setting the encounter difficulty as though all three of them were in the same place and throwing them together repeatedly until they either resolve their differences, get eaten by monsters, or kill ...


8

I disagree with the others saying you should try to bring the characters back together. Then again, I also do not believe in "My Guy Syndrome" as being a bad thing. That said, I think the fairest solution to this is that you - as the DM - are telling a story with the players. This character has chosen to leave the group, and is therefore no longer part of ...


6

The bulk of RPGs are not only about group storytelling. They are about creating a story about a group. However, players sometimes need reminding. Try that first, and say that you are not keen on running a story about 2 separate parties. Your reasons might be that it will divide the time you can dedicate to each party, and also increase the amount of prep ...


39

Don't make it your problem. Make it their problem. (The players). If you don't want to run a split party, since it increases DM work load, then before the next game session begins you need to tell the players that you are not interested in running two games instead of one. Core reason: DM's are allowed to have fun too. Then, as you suggested yourself, ...


19

When a character leaves the party, the right thing is usually to make that character an NPC. Offer the player the opportunity to bring in a new character to join the party (with the same experience and gold). This lets you preserve the character's decision to leave the party, but also lets you keep the group together. In my games I have a rule which is ...


12

The solution somewhat depends on what the other players are using the "downtime" for. If they are all pushing for short rests between combats to use their hit dice for healing, then a Cleric of the Life Domain is particularly good. In terms of mass healing for cheap, you might consider a single level of druid, or two levels of Ranger, with remaining ...


-2

If multiclass is an option, Warlock 2 Bard 6 has a great combination of offensive and defensive capabilities. If not, a Life cleric is unparalleled as a healer.


1

A logical way to deal with this is simply to arrange things so that scouting ahead really does mean scouting ahead by reducing the opportunities for easy XP and making it more dangerous to be anything other than very cautious. For example perhaps that tempting lone sentry is really bait for an ambush or the enemy realises that there are scouts out and has ...


2

You've noted you're a new DM. The first thing I would check for is to make sure you and this player are both using the rules correctly. If he's saying stealth works in a certain way, make sure he's reading the entire rule and that you are too. A second consideration is how you're playing your monsters. I've been the dude out scouting, when I find the lone ...


3

Our working model to give experience is based on two main sources of experience points: story milestones (whole group) interpretation (single player) You kill all the dogs, kobolds, bandits you find on the road? fine, 0xp. You do it alone? 0xp. You kill the dragon? 0xp anyway. You save the princess? 3.500xp to each player. You ...


-2

So your player can scout ahead and take down a band of enemies meant for the whole party? Is he/she that strong? If the player charges into a group of enemies designed to challenge the whole party on their own, they'll probably be killed!


8

Play the encounters as if they were balanced for a party. A single character should then logically be handed their backside on a plate and either retreat or die. If you are designing encounters in such a way that a single clever player can defeat them then IMO the PC is entitled to the XP and the problem is that the DM is failing to produce a challenging ...


3

A lot of answers involve beating the guy over the head with rules. What about just dropping a note to a particularly paranoid or Good character. Have them notice his exit, and cause him to wonder enough to follow on his own accord. Perhaps the new wealth gets noticed? Is there no other greedy character, to exploit?!! ;)


22

I know you asked specifically about in-game methods, but in-game methods for altering player behavior are notoriously unreliable. If you punish the character for scouting ahead, the player is less likely to realize why everything is suddenly so hard, and more likely to assume you're just a mean DM. This sounds like a problem that needs to be talked out out-...


3

Don't give individual XP awards. Therefore, the party is all in it together. Also, it's easier to compute the XP at the end in one batch without individual break-outs. That's the obvious answer. Another response which was traditional in play, but today might be considered radical, is to implement the classic caller/leader role. That is: Assume by default ...


22

The goal is to build an incentive system where "I'm going to farm for a while" yields less XP than "we're all going to advance the adventure together". That way, adventuring together is the most effective way to get more powerful. Step one, disincentivize solo farming. Every build has a counter. He's stealthy? Monster with blindsight. Wizard with alarm's ...


21

I see several easy ways to fix that: Split XP between all the members of the team (it's not clear if you already do that) Don't reward with XP easy confrontations. What an "easy" confrontation is should be considered at the scale of the whole team. It will make "farming" dangerous, so if a character needs power he has to get the help of the others. Stop ...


47

Two possible solutions: If the problem player continues to hunt ahead of the party on his own, sooner or later he'll get in over his head and run into a large Troll or band of Orcs. At which point he'll wish he had more backup! If he's lucky he'll only lose a bunch of hit points before retreating. Not so lucky, he'll be captured or killed. Either way, ...


111

The easiest way is to stop giving out XP at all. D&D very prominently features the so-called milestone rule in their Hoard of the Dragon Queen/Tyranny of Dragons adventures. They later refined that into the "Story-Based Advancement" rule that can be found in the DMG page 261, "Level Advancement without XP". They also introduced something else also ...


5

Your party is fine, don't try to force them to change. The balance you are looking for is inherent in the separate schools of magic. Your first problem is actually a really easy one to fix: Have the casters make up spell casting cards for themselves so they don't have to constantly look them up. I don't mind letting new players get used to this, but if ...


0

Stop giving them reasons to split up You are the one that keeps presenting situations that encourage the party to split. Just stop doing that. You admit that, "when they did split, it was for good reason." So, what do you expect them to do - act against their own interests just to make it easier on you? You can ask them, but I don't think they'll be very ...


2

You can always say no, but if this is happening frequently, look at your scenarios. Joshua's answer is of course correct, though I think GMJoe summed it up even better with this script: "In real life, the advantage of splitting the party is that it allows you to do more than one thing at a time. However, as a GM, I can only resolve one situation at a ...



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