New answers tagged

1

It sounds like you've identified that your character isn't working with the party -- people are unhappy. That's a good first step. One good fix is to switch characters. Ask the DM if you can retire your character and bring in another character that will be a better fit with the group. Bring in a character that can fill a support role in combat -- an ...


11

So, there are a number of problems here. 1. Poor class design First of all, your party’s choices of class are problematic: all of them are difficult-to-use classes, where a naïve approach to them, attempting to use them to create the characters they’re described as, tends to work poorly. The exception there is the bard, but even the bard, as jack of ...


2

Don't dumb down your play You seem to be doing a great job playing your character, from a tactical perspective. (This is common with players who also play tactical wargames, like myself.) You don't want to stop doing that, or deliberately make mistakes. Your party-members won't thank you for that, and you'll come across as even more conceited and self-...


1

As a GM you cannot and should not force, coerce, and manipulate your players to satisfy your needs even if it is for their own good. Of course, OP are not doing that (as OP pointed out in a comment), so that is good. You need to talk to the players and raise your concerns. Ask them if they share those concerns and if so, what you all should do about it. I ...


7

The core of the issue As far as I can see, the most common cause of this issue is that the players don't feel the need to roleplay the sort of relationships you're after, because as far as they can tell, their characters have little reason to feel that way about each other. As DM, you can't tell the characters how to feel, but you can put them in situations ...


5

I have run a number of variously successful campaigns in D&D and Pathfinder that fall into that same middle area you described. A few times I ran into similar trouble as you, where the characters were having serious trouble bonding and forming connections beyond "we have to work together right now." I think that one of the most important things to do ...


0

"To be friends" does not mean the same thing for everyone, so it is likely it won't mean the same thing for every PC. If your group is composed of standard murderhobos, friendship can come from mutual help. You have to show them how they all need each other to do their murderhobo stuff. For example you can make the warrior being targeted by a curse, let ...


0

Your story is important, but so is the desire of the players to actually 'ROLEPLAY' their characters. This is where knowing your group dynamic is important. Some groups desire the classic "Hack & Slash" type of dungeon crawl adventure, of killing the dragon and taking the hoard. Others enjoy the narrative aspect of the adventure, the "why" of the ...


0

The party dynamic itself is in and of itself an adventure. I have been in games and run games where the PCs hate each other but work toward the common goal because if they don't they all will lose. I have had one PC hire assassins to kill part of the party for balancing the representation of all the alignments against the extra-planar incursion, whereas it ...


22

I've got a buddy at work... we watch Game of Thrones together. My lasting college friends were all on our Ultimate Frisbee team together. 5e's got this too... Downtime Activities. The one tool I've best used to encourage the growth of PC-PC relationships is those characters' downtime activities. In one group there's a pair that like to run Three-Card Monty ...


5

The Dungeon Master's Guide[1] has two recommendations for DMs when a new player joins an in-progress campaign. The first is to have the new player create a character at the same level as that of the lowest-level existing character. The second is to have a player who is brand new to D&D create a 1st-level character. (See also: At what level should you ...


-5

Its best to be on the same level because its more fun to play when you have the things happening at the same time, instead of your friends having some suprise first than you.


13

No. There is no rule requiring that all characters in the group be the same level. Additionally, it's not uncommon in organized official Adventurer's League play to be at a table where each character in the group is a different level within the intended tier of play for that adventure. The gap in character advancement should narrow naturally over the ...



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