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6

Mundane Villainy Is More Interesting than Magical Villainy If the villain uses magic to create problems, then magic is what'll be used to solve those problems. However, if the mundane is used to create problems, magic and the mundane can be used to solve those problems. Further, the players don't feel as though you're cheating if the villain's just ...


6

So long as you borrow from 3.5, you're set. You're looking for the Chameleon PrC from Races of Destiny. First, it's fairly easy for a higher-level wizard to impersonate a fighter, all they need to do is cast mages' transformation on themselves. But, in order to do this from a lower level, things become quite interesting. The Chameleon, at sufficiently high ...


4

Assuming you want it to be a seventh ability score, here’s an idea. It expands on a mechanic I have used often in my games and find quite useful. The Luck Score Luck is an ability score. It ranges from 0 upwards, and produces a Luck modifier equal to ⌊Luck/2⌋-5, as all ability scores do. Be sure to modify your character generation rules to account ...


4

How can I make the player happy again, and avoid having to kill the paladin? It seems to be a drastic change, so the best way seems to be to create a new character and play that. I'm not in favor of killing the old one though. There are a million ways to part ways and why would it always be death? As a paladin, he could be ordered to help fighting evil ...


4

Address the problem at the source: Retcon1 the story. If your players demand an in-story explanation, remember the origins of the owlbear: "A wizard did it." At the end of the day, all the participants involved are aware that the game that they are playing is a story. The cleanest solution, therefore, to an external (non-narrative) story influence that is ...


3

The cure I think the easiest remedy is to let him pick a new character, and make the paladin go with the group while you close all his plots and prepare a transition. You can also make the player control the two characters, or give the paladin to someone else. Talk to your players about the approach and tell them the situation is temporary. The prevention ...


3

Not much, save by DM fiat, also beware introducing chaotic evil characters to a non-evil party (or any party at all, for that matter) and expecting that party to continue adventuring. 3.5 Had the blackguard, which allowed high level paladins to swap moral absolutes (purely intentionally though, no accidental falls allowed), and just made low-level fallen ...


2

There exists Symbol of Sleep Which is a spell that does exactly what you want. I put the description here, and left only the most important bits in. This spell allows you to scribe a potent rune of power upon a surface. All creatures of 10 HD or less within 60 feet of the symbol of sleep fall into a catatonic slumber for 3d6×10 minutes. Unlike with ...


2

"there is no way around that". There probably is a way around it, but it depends exactly what you've set up. The PC could be eaten by a grue next session due to a series of bad decisions and/or dice rolls. The world would continue, even if those NPCs all die due to lack of that particular paladin. Options that might work depending on your plot and your ...


2

The DM will probably be the ultimate authority about Using the Acrobatics Skill to Avoid Attacks of Opportunity The rules are contradictory. In one part of the description of the skill Acrobatics, an Acrobatics skill check is made to move through a threatened square (i.e. roll once per creature per square), while elsewhere in the skill description an ...


2

Part 1: How many check per enemy? One, using the higher DC (5 + enemy's CMD) for going through their square. That individual, even with feats, will only get one AoO against you this round and making you succeed two or three times for a single action against one opponent is unnecessarily cruel. Part 2: What if there are more enemies? A check for each enemy ...


2

The above advice is all very good, but I would also like to add another option. Over the years (been GMing since the early 80's) I've occasionally had players make characters that seemed like fun, but once they got into the game discover that they, for whatever reason, just didn't enjoy the character, they would let me know and I would usually go with one ...


1

Brian stated it far better that I could ever could. If a certain mechanical aspect blocks your story and hurts the fun of your players, throw it away. But I do believe that there are other things to solve this idea which may be a little less drastic. Talk with the player It is my number one solution to most of the problems I've encountered: have a ...


1

Out-of-game, what is this phylactery of faithfulness for? What about it does the player hate? Why don't you just get rid of it? How does it even work, is it magically nailed to the guy or can he just drop it on his chief's desk, say that he's not a child any more and will stand by his own bad decisions if he does anything wrong, and march out of there ...



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