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27

No. From 3.5 SRD: The Basics – Abilities and Spellcasters: Abilities And Spellcasters The ability that governs bonus spells depends on what type of spellcaster your character is: Intelligence for wizards; Wisdom for clerics, druids, paladins, and rangers; or Charisma for sorcerers and bards. In addition to having a high ability score, a ...


16

While I applaud the wizard's chutzpah... The Accidental Activation Rule Is Terrible I fully agree with KRyan and Ernir that ignoring the accidental activation text is the best way to go. It causes more problems than it solves. I'm of the opinion that it's included only so the DM can have hilarious situations occur at the tavern because the wizard forgot ...


14

I have to agree that the wording in the original rules is not a 100% explicit. It is clear that you cannot cast spells of a higher level than you have access to, but can you prepare them? The Pathfinder FAQ has a more complete answer, emphasis mine: No. You only get the bonus spells if your class level grants you access to those spell levels. You can't ...


14

Because the celestial eagle summoned by the celestial commander understands him, Yes, the Eagle Can Aid Another in Combat According to the spell summon monster I et. al. the summoned creature "attacks your opponents to the best of its ability. If you can communicate with the creature, you can direct it not to attack, to attack particular enemies, or to ...


14

You're right that the basic initiative rules just kinda assume everyone's in the fight at the beginning of the battle and don't say more than that, so the addition of late arrivals requires some interpretation. In general, as new arrivals become aware of and desire to participate in the battle, they should just roll initiative for the first round they're ...


11

Absolutely. In fact, the duration of the spell is instantaneous, which means that it can't be dispelled once it has taken effect. If a druid is good enough at convincing animals to follow them, they can have as many intelligent followers as they want. This is no different from the rules for getting regular people to follow you. If you have a paladin or a ...


9

Yes, with difficulty. Celestial/Fiendish animals summoned with Summon Monster have their normal animal intelligence. They don't have languages, but they can be commanded like any animals can, namely, with Handle Animal. Since the summoned creatures don't have any tricks listed in their descriptions, it's pretty safe to assume that they don't know any. ...


8

Aid another does not require any particular intelligence; no such requirement is noted in the rules, and plenty of real-world creatures with animal-like intelligence, or even creatures that are mindless under the rules, exhibit behavior designed to help one another. And since the creatures you summon can understand Celestial, they can understand your order ...


8

No, the character can't activate more than one magic item per "spoken command word". The limitation comes from the action requirement. From the text you yourself quoted: Activating a command word magic item is a standard action and does not provoke attacks of opportunity. NB: Regardless of what kind of an action it is to speak the command word, the ...


8

Yes, you can. But that doesn't mean you should. I'm not aware of any mechanic in Pathfinder by which a shifter can change classes when they change form, and I'd be very surprised if there was one - it defeats the purpose of a class-based system. However, you're the GM. Your primary responsibility is to make a game that's fun for everyone. You can ...


7

This two feats interact the way she is thinking they do? Yes. She can prepare a lvl 7 Heightened Lightning Bolt and cast it as much as she wants with the reserve feat (at a shorter range than the official spell). When she levels up, and eventually gain access to higher slots, she can fill them with Heightened Lightning Bolts and use them as much as she ...


7

Yes, the Pathfinder FAQ is RAW - inasmuch as RAW is definable. The Pathfinder FAQ is attached to the relevant product pages, it is written by the game designers, and considered authoritative by the community. 1) The FAQ considers itself official in its text - and it notes explicitly when it is making unofficial pronouncements, e.g. Technically the ...


6

In D&D 3.5 at least, it depends on the character class. Some classes have zeroes in their "spells per day" columns. For example, the Bard has "0" in the column for 1st-level spells at character level 2, but "-" in the column for 2nd-level spells. This means that a 2nd-level bard can cast 1st-level spells if they have a high enough Charisma score, but ...


6

I assume you mean 'reach' and not 'range.' Let's go look at the Gorilla entry: Melee 2 slams +3 (1d6+2) Space 10 ft.; Reach 10 ft. So how does reach work? Well, it's explained in the rules, and the PFSRD has some helpful template pictures as well. Short answer is yes, the gorilla is 2x2 and can attack within a 6x6 area.


6

When referring to a table that describes what bonuses you get at a particular level, each level does not stack with the ones before it. This applies to anything numeric: spells per day, save, BAB, experience, etc. For example, Barbarians get +1 to their BAB each level. At level 5, they have a total of +5 BAB, which is what is listed on the table. For ...


6

So long as you borrow from 3.5, you're set. You're looking for the Chameleon PrC from Races of Destiny. First, it's fairly easy for a higher-level wizard to impersonate a fighter, all they need to do is cast mages' transformation on themselves. But, in order to do this from a lower level, things become quite interesting. The Chameleon, at sufficiently high ...


6

Mundane Villainy Is More Interesting than Magical Villainy If the villain uses magic to create problems, then magic is what'll be used to solve those problems. However, if the mundane is used to create problems, magic and the mundane can be used to solve those problems. Further, the players don't feel as though you're cheating if the villain's just ...


5

It's for interaction with existing rules. So, our ability here reads thusly: Brain Drain (Su): You can take a standard action to violently probe the mind of a single intelligent enemy within 100 feet. The target receives a Will save to negate the effect and immediately knows the source of this harmful mental prying. Those who fail this save are wracked ...


5

The FAQ is problematic as RAW The FAQ is updated without announcement or fanfare, which makes it difficult to track over time. Unless one is actively involved in the Pathfinder community, this means that the rules may change without you knowing about it, and it may do so often. Official errata is a bigger deal, which gets more attention. It also tends to ...


5

Yes, it changes the spell level so it works Heighten Spell is unique amongst metamagic feats in that it increases the effective spell level. So yes, preparing a heightened lightning bolt to 7th level is a 7th level spell for all purposes, including reserve feats. Assuming she has 7th level spell slots to do this, it works. And while it's hardly the most ...


5

Go with it. Let it happen. Have them roll a will save (equal to say 15 + the number of pearls) and for every number under the DC they roll, that spell will cast at a random target. After all, the caster is recalling quite a few spells at once which is not something they can normally do, it should require a check and have consequences for failure. I'm ...


5

Maybe my interpretation is off, but I never considered flanking to be about "where" you strike a foe, but about the fact that they can't watch both of you at the same time. Making an attack against an opponent that can't see you to react is the source of the bonus. This is consistent with the rule for All-Around Vision. This means it's perfectly reasonable ...


4

Continued forced march or hustling deals non-lethal damage if you fail the required constitution check. Normally, receiving non-lethal damage this way would cause you to become fatigued, which would be prevented by extreme endurance. This would not, however, prevent the non-lethal damage from piling up and eventually putting you out of commission. As for ...


4

Scaling is hard. D&D, and most other RPG systems, are designed for human sized creatures. Get too far away from the average, and weird stuff starts to happen. In D&D, but also in any other system that tries to model scale (except maybe Fudge? I recall that these scale issues were a big part of the inspiration for that). If you really want to handle ...


4

It is much simpler than you are making it sound. Lets start with a quick note about when you have to make the checks from the fly skill text: Note that these restrictions only apply to movement taken during your current turn. At the beginning of the next turn, you can move in a different direction than you did the previous turn without making a ...


4

Yes, the effects of Awaken are Permanent The spell awaken has a duration of instantaneous, which I'll quote the effects of here. Instantaneous The spell energy comes and goes the instant the spell is cast, though the consequences might be long-lasting. In the case of Awaken, the spell doesn't make sense with that duration if the effects aren't ...


4

Assuming you want it to be a seventh ability score, here’s an idea. It expands on a mechanic I have used often in my games and find quite useful. The Luck Score Luck is an ability score. It ranges from 0 upwards, and produces a Luck modifier equal to ⌊Luck/2⌋-5, as all ability scores do. Be sure to modify your character generation rules to account ...


4

Address the problem at the source: Retcon1 the story. If your players demand an in-story explanation, remember the origins of the owlbear: "A wizard did it." At the end of the day, all the participants involved are aware that the game that they are playing is a story. The cleanest solution, therefore, to an external (non-narrative) story influence that is ...


4

How can I make the player happy again, and avoid having to kill the paladin? It seems to be a drastic change, so the best way seems to be to create a new character and play that. I'm not in favor of killing the old one though. There are a million ways to part ways and why would it always be death? As a paladin, he could be ordered to help fighting evil ...


3

The rules for combat in D&D do start to break down in various places when you start dealing with very small or very large creatures and as you've observed, one of these places is flanking. I'd guess the reason flanking works this way is simplicity. It's a lot easier to say you need to have reach to flank and be on opposite sides than to have special ...



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