Hot answers tagged

20

First of all, you don't need any rules precedent to integrate time travel into your campaign, as D.M. its your prerogative to add any feature into your world that you please. That being said, there is some precedent that is applicable in this situation! In the source book The Plane Above - The Secrets of the Astral Sea we get a direct, although short, ...


18

Although this has an answer for the Forgotten Realms, the “normal setting” in the PHB is not the Forgotten Realms and there is no canonical answer for just D&D 5e by itself. The DMG goes into more detail about setting, but the basic concept is that the “default” setting of D&D 5e is mostly unwritten so that the DM can build it up from various pieces ...


14

Permanent is hard. A portable hole, glued to the floorboards, might be about the best you can do. But you can do sort-of-permanent: Demiplane, the 8th-level spell, should serve you well. The portal's only open for an hour at a time, but you can re-cast to access the same extra-dimensional space if you like (PHB p.231). So the stuff is stored in a ~permanent~...


11

Here's the description of the boots of teleportation: Any character wearing this footwear may teleport three times per day, exactly as if he had cast the spell of the same name. Since it says the effect is exactly like the teleport spell, we can just look at that spell's description: This spell instantly transports you to a designated destination, ...


11

The 5e version of the plane shift spell is continuing a long tradition of using these forked metal rods as part of the spellcasting. A spell named plane shift, used to teleport between different planes, and requiring forked metal rods, has been present in every single edition of Dungeons & Dragons, with the sole exception of the very original, and 4e, ...


11

Read The Planescape (AD&D 2e) sourcebook The Inner Planes. The 3.5e model of the Planes is based on Planescape, which is a popular setting published about during the AD&D 2e era of Dungeons & Dragons. The book in particular that you're looking for is The Inner Planes, containing information on both the Elemental Plane of Fire and the various ...


11

Generally, no If you're playing standard D&D, I don't think that restriction is in place, particularly because standard D&D tends to stay based on the Prime Material Plane and doesn't tend to bother with extraplanar matters in detail. However, if you're running Planescape, or a variant of it, that is completely different. The Planewalker's ...


10

No and no: No, 5e does not use the Great Wheel cosmology — not by default. It's one of the many options available for a DM, but 5e presents only ingredients for a homebrewed cosmology, and very few pieces that are assumed as defaults (usually in things like magic item descriptions, such as the bag of holding). In the Great Wheel cosmology, the Astral is ...


10

You'll be wanting the 3rd Edition Planar Handbook, whose section on the City of Brass helps flesh out the Plane of Fire as well; the 2nd Edition sourcebook The Inner Planes; and the 2nd Edition Al-Qadim sourcebook Secrets of the Lamp (if you can find it). The 2nd Edition Planescape Monstrous Compendium III offers some notes on Fire wildlife such as the ...


10

The supplement you probably want is "Planes of Law," which describes the lawfully-aligned planes of the Great Wheel in detail. Mechanus is, naturally, one of the planes it covers. You'll probably not find any treatment of the plane more detailed than this; It was released during the heyday of 2e AD&D's Planescape campaign setting, which expanded the ...


7

Your dead high elf wizard isn't a high elf wizard when he wakes up in the Upper Planes. He is a petitioner - identical in appearance and personality, but lacking the skills and abilities (and much of the memories) that he had in life. A petitioner is essentially rooted in the plane it's arrived to, and can't be taken away from it; its ultimate fate is to ...


6

There are a few for 2E Because of course there are. The Priest's Spell Compendium, Vol. 3 lists on page 801 Vedic Spells based on traditional Hindu mythology. These spells originally appeared in a Dragon Magazine article but the notes for reincarnation sight are from the section on Indian mythology from the Legends & Lore book. Om (1st) ...


6

First, you're the GM, so it gets there by virtue of the fact that you said it's there. However, I think you're really asking "when my players talk to this creature, how can it reply within the standard PF rules?". So, roughly in order of least powerful to most powerful: A random rift between the planes opened up, and the elemental fell through. Planar ...


5

Good question! Gozreh is said to dwell "at the horizon, where the sea meets the sky" (Gods and Magic, 18). As a result pathfinderwiki.com lists his/her home as the Material Plane. In his/her more full article in Pathfinder #38, Racing to Ruin, it only notes "Many cloud and storm giants are native to her planar realm," hinting that there is one, but this is ...


5

A Dragon article describes plane shift's forked rods A list of tuning forks for AD&D for use with the spell plane shift appears in the Dragon #120 (Apr. 1987) article "Plane Speaking: Tuning in to the Outer Planes" (43-4). Names of planes changed with editions, but determining, for example, that D&D 3.5's Carceri is 1987's Tarterus takes only a ...


5

The assumption with the spell and related effects is that staying on the ethereal plane takes magical power, and is not a default state for creatures not native to the plane and which have not physically traveled there via Plane Shift or similar effect. So blinking into the ethereal plane is a temporary enabled spell effect, powered by active magic, and you ...


5

While the succubus is in the ethereal plane, can you see her? Yes, if you are on the ethereal plane and near enough to see her through all of the mists and such. If you are not on the ethereal plane -- no. The exception to that case is use of a device or spell that allows you to see into the ethereal plane. (True Seeing/See Invisible being two spells ...


5

While it doesn't allow sight, Greater Alarm from the Spell Compendium will at least tell you whether there are any enemies in the vicinity. Given the fact that the spell is 2nd level and there is a 4th level spell that actually allows someone to travel to the Plane of Shadow temporarily (Shadow Well) I would probably estimate a spell that allowed you to see ...


4

Sadly the rules are, if not silent, very quiet on this issue. In 3.5e this was handled by the Extraplanar subtype that creatures acquired when they traveled between planes and the rule that any creature that was not Extraplanar defaulted to being a native of the material plane. 5e is a brave new world though so we can't just use those rules. Native, or ...


4

The answer to this question will depend largely on how difficult you, as the GM, want it to be. If you want it to be easy, there's a convenient Portal back to the Elemental Plane of Earth nearby that the poor elemental just can't activate (it could even be keyed so that just elementals can go through - or the elemental can "suggest" to the players that they ...


4

Wiktionary: nature The innate characteristics of a thing. What something will tend by its own constitution, to be or do. Distinct from what might be expected or intended. Kind, sort; character; quality. They’re using the word in one of these kinds of senses; no special game jargon. They’re just saying that if you’re familiar with what kind of ...


3

The planes are separate, independent and infinite. There are connections between the planes but, in general, they are not spacial connections that you can walk, sail or otherwise move between by physical means. The DMG describes planar travel starting on p. 44: Planar portals - these can connect any plane to any other plane as decided by the DM. Sail your ...


3

By default, no There are no rules that state magic items become less powerful based on which plane they are on. (If there were, whatever magic items you took to the Astral Plane would also have become weaker, right?) Especially the Holy Avenger, which is a named item, says nothing about its power being linked to the Astral Plane. But still Considering ...


3

Apparently, Not damage I asked this question to Jeremy Crawford on Twitter. The answer was a link to a previous answer he left someone else: https://twitter.com/JeremyECrawford/status/746062633632038912 No general rule causes force damage to pass from one plane of existence to another. #DnD So, even my premise is wrong. Force damage doesn't pass ...


2

There is no evidence in the rules to support any specific interpretation of what this metal rod attunement could mean. We could extrapolate from the magical item attunement rules, which may or not be correct and would certainly be confusing. I won't do that here because the answer to this question doesn't rely on that -- it's simply one interpretation of ...


1

Through extensive research, as far as the Demiplane is concerned, the ability to determine its time is either DM decision or create an epic Genesis spell in which it functions the exact same as Genesis but with more clarification it's abilities. However, if including third party material, specifically the book Chronomancy: The power of time, A chronomancer,...


1

Yes they can. Normally, creatures in the Border Ethereal can't attack creatures on the overlapped plane, and vice versa. A traveler on the Ethereal Plane is invisible and utterly silent to someone on the overlapped plane, and solid objects on the overlapped plane don't hamper the movement of a creature in the Border Ethereal The exceptions ...


1

It has been renamed to the Banehold and floats around in the Astral Sea as one of the Astral Dominions. See p62 of the Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. Seeing as the "Barrens of Doom and Despair" used to be labeled as one of the Fiendish Outer planes (see p140 of the Player's Guide to Faerun), this must have been quite the upheaval (do take note that the ...


1

There is no such spell in 3rd Edition or 3.5. In Pathfinder, I think there was a character class built around the concept (some people lump Pathfinder in with third edition D&D; I don't know whether you count that). There was a "Past Lives" spell in AD&D 2e, but it just let you peek at the last few minutes of a corpse's life. I'm not aware of any ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible