Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

I ran D&D games on IRC for several years. The biggest challenges were: Agreeing on a game time is tricky. When you've got international players, this is a major factor. We used a Google Calendar to post availability, and picked times when five or more were available. Communication is more cumbersome online. It may not seem like it, but response time is ...


9

The best experience of playing over the internet is done through the combination of a voice chat program and a virtual tabletop. A virtual tabletop program is a specialized whiteboard software that allows the sharing of images, text chatting, and dice rolling. Typically they allows smaller images, known as tokens, to be placed on a shared image, and many ...


7

An IRC server would be the easiest answer. Pick a server, create a room, and have everyone connect to it with their character name as their /nick. All you need to do is denote some form of "This is how to talk OOC" (such as simply putting 'OOC' before each line), and you're good to go. You can even look into dice-rolling bots and/or a server which already ...


6

I would suggest you try roll20.net you do a play by play setting, or you can upgrade, as you can add on screen maps, voice, and even video chat. This also has regular chat, and other functions in this chat that make gameplay go much more smoothly.


6

Since this question was originally asked, more options that might give a better solution have become available. Specifically, the Roll20 online virtual tabletop. With Roll20 you can invite people by email address and they can play as their character while in-game. Some tools make it much easier even for new users, including irc style chat, voice chat and ...


5

I've played in numerous text-based games and the problems I encountered in those inspired me to work on my own text based gaming medium. While this answer will sum up problems I've encountered as Jonathan already mentioned some, it's also an ad for my free, non-profit text based roleplaying platform. But first, issues I've encountered: (IRC related) ...


5

In my experience, the best place to find an online group is reddit. They even have a handy filter at the top for finding only online games. Pathfinder and D&D 3+ are very popular there, and other games pop up less frequently (I found an amazing Changeling game via reddit, for example.) As others have mentioned, forums are a good second option: Giant ...


5

I've tried to run a campaign via IRC, but it didn't work well. Players can be easily distracted and you don't even know until you notice they are lagging. They are also more prone not to take it seriously, not showing up at all. Finally, they can experience technical difficulties. I wouldn't ever consider it again unless I've really got no other option. ...


5

Whoo, boy. I need to give a disclaimer first off: this is definitely self-advertising, although I swear I'm just trying to be helpful. :) I love IRC roleplaying, specifically because it (with the right group) allows you to create much more vibrant, detailed stories than you can in-person. You can write at your own pace, and the game is only as immediate ...


4

There's a fairly stable, medium-sized IRC network called Darkmyst that caters to roleplaying. I'm assuming there are others, but that's one I've been with for about eleven years now, and they've certainly got a lot of interesting games going on, as well as a service tailored specifically to help find games called RPGServ, a service providing basic dicerolls ...


4

One thing that helps me as a DM in my very large, easily distracted group is to implement an "on-deck" call. So I'll say, "John, your turn. Jane, you're up next", and make sure I get an acknowledgement that Jane heard me. Even if Jane hadn't been paying attention until now, it gives her all of John's turn to get caught up on what's been happening (which on ...


3

Well, in the end you have to either torque down and agree on rules to make it go faster/more in character or deal with it being slow and not in character. The best rules you could enforce as a group are: You have to declare your combat action in XX amount of time or you lose your turn. You had a "distraction?" Well, it's not like you can't play with us ...


3

Let's combine some of this into a compendium. Play-by-chat has been at least 80% of my time spent as a GM. It is a fun way to play because it allows immersion and in-character roleplaying to have more depth by allowing players to write their words and actions, which most people are quite comfortable with. But like all other RPG sessions, you need players. ...


3

RISUS is perfect for your needs RISUS is system-neutral, so you can use it in any setting at all. I've used it to run fantasy one-shots, a modern crime game, and a futuristic robot-fighting campaign. Interactions are resolved by rolling a d6 per level you have in the skill you're using. In combat, you use opposed rolls and the loser's skill drops by one ...


3

It sounds like you're not wedded to IRC at all, just the concept of a custom play-by-text RPG tool, considering you say that "Roll20 is essentially the same thing". Roll20 is currently popular, but by no means the only example of a RPG-focused application. Most of the popular ones are stand-alone desktop clients, and yes, they do have a lot of excellent, ...


3

We much preferred VSee to other chat programs and play-by-post or -e-mail gaming. As far as dice goes, you can't go wrong with dicelog. The most difficult challenges was keeping people focused, from a DM perspective. Being at the same table contributes a lot. I combated this by preparing many, many speeches and such in advance, as well as working toward ...


3

IRC is great for a lot of kinds of RP, but you need to keep in mind the kinds of things it's not good for. Here is a quick list of the pros and cons that spring to mind based on my experience: IRC is slow This is great to get people to give you really detailed actions. Here's a randomly-chosen line from a IRC-like game: His expression returns to its ...


2

I like using video conference calls with Skype, distributing campaign materials offline (i.e., outside the gaming session) for people to print out, with keyword-based character sheets that everyone can see and a list of player secrets that only the player and narrator knows, and using the lightweight paper-scissors-rock as a conflict resolution mechanism, ...


2

I played in an IRC game back in college. I don't remember how long the sessions lasted, but the game fizzled after a month or two. Pros The GM was able to copy and paste description. I think his doing this was what kept the game going at a good pace. IRC dice rolling was easy. /roll 2d10. Trivial. Infinite handles. What I mean by this was that if ...


2

We had our first session last night and it was a tremendous success. We used Skype for both in-character text chat and out-of-character rules and clarifying discussion. I really like this because the result is a relatively clean transcript of the actual in-character bits and speedier resolution of the mechanical elements of game play. Best of all, minutes ...


2

Forums tend to favor play-by-post games on that forum; you may have better luck with IRC channels. There are many out there, but the only one I'm personally familiar with is #giantitp. They're not very big on Pathfinder, though, they prefer 3.5 standard.


2

For planetside adventures, I recommend "Star Worlds - The Streets of Mos Eisley". This is a hack powered by the Apocalypse engine. It has the most faithful character classes to the Star Wars movies, plus hirelings, adversaries, vehicles and spacecraft, and a great keyed map of the infamous spaceport. When you take those vessels into space, I recommend ...


2

I would suggest you try Star Wars World, a hack of Apocalypse World. You can download the rules from here, though discussion is held on the story games site in the link above. In general, the Apocalypse World engine satisfies a lot of the need to have it in an interactive environment not meant for RPGs, i.e. It uses 2d6 for resolution, with 6- meaning a ...


1

You have to have a rules of order so that people aren't typing over each other and causing there to be multiple conversations going on at the same time in a shared chatbox. It can be an issue, but having some way for people to buzz in (such as a smiley emoticon as the signal they want to talk) can help keep order. As for services, let me recommend ...


1

It's not nearly as common as Play-by-post games, but I've certainly seen posts recruiting for play-by-chat games on the Paizo forums. It's especially a good fit since you're looking for Pathfinder players.


1

Most RPG Forums have sections for finding people for play-by-post, skype or in person games. Some links that may help (these are sites I have used before, although not for online games): Giant in the Playground Knights 'n' Knaves Role-Player.net However, I would suggest looking for Pathfinder-specific forums or sites if you can (I can't personally ...


1

Not sure if this is relevant but... If you're doing DnD4e or another tactical game, it's essential to have a gameboard/tabletop in front of your players. You could use something like http://onlinetabletop.appspot.com/ or http://beta.ditzie.com/dnd but I've seen people have good success with just a Google Docs spreadsheet that everyone is viewing.


1

You can use Google Hangout to run an RPG which makes video-conferencing easy and there are a few applications out to show text/boards/or other visual elements such as character sheets. You also asked about PBP boards. I've searched around for a couple of years and the best one I could find is DnD Online Games. They have a great community of avid, serious, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible