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44

No Roleplay should be about having fun. When you start to punish your players, it is very possible that they will quit your campaign. Even if your players are doing it just to pull your leg, you shouldn't make the game painful as noone will enjoy it. I would reccomend following options: Speak with them face to face after the game. It happens, that ...


28

No such good techniques exist and neither should you try to use them. What you are asking about is how to best rail road the players. This is generally considered a bad thing(TM) as it robs players of their freedom. However, you can do something about your fears: set expectations. Tell your players what you just told us in your question and ask for their ...


19

You aren't the first to have that thought - there are these legends of GMs who, after getting fed up with constantly derailed plotlines, decides to kill off their party with an abrupt rockslide. Overall, though, I think you're facing the problem the wrong way. You're thinking about how you can prevent players from ignoring the plot you give them - instead, ...


13

I think everyone who has started GMing has had the same concerns. My personal recommendation regarding your idea of making players unlucky when not following the main plot is to do the opposite: A wizard wants to brew the greatest potion? An alchemist in league with the BBG has years of research that could be vital to their task. A warrior wishes to ...


10

Friend, never do that Gornemant of Gohort, Perceval, The Story of the Grail The problem with players going off the rails is the rails. The advantage traditional role-playing has over video games is the shared storytelling. Lean into that advantage whenever you can. If the players "go the wrong way," or refuse to take hints, you might be tempted ...


10

I agree with all of the answers here, but they fail to address another reason this is a bad idea: Not only will your players not like it once they figure out what's happening, there is no good guarantee that they will even understand that they are experiencing bad luck because they are wandering off script. The message you are sending with this technique is ...


7

For me, the answer is no. I do not see my job as GM as one of creating plotlines for the characters to follow. My job is to create the world for them to inhabit. I create antagonists whom they may choose to oppose. I create mysteries they may choose to investigate. I create sites they may choose to explore. I create hooks to suggest goals to PCs that may not ...


4

It depends on what you want your game to look like. There are different kinds of roleplaying games, but what matters here is how much you want to world to be realistic. If the world is very realistic you can't "cheat" to make them follow the plot. The plot will have to be strong enough for the PC not to derail from them. Here I call realistic worlds that ...


3

Yes, with some caveats First, you're going to need player buy-in if you want to use fate/fortune to guide the PC's towards the story as you have it imagined. The option to play a game 'on the rails' can be enjoyable, assuming everyone involved is willing. Second, the fact that fortune is getting in their way needs to be known to the players, if not to the ...


3

I understand it can frustrating to have your players deviate from your well-planned story, but nothing prevents you from tweeking it a bit so it fits the players' choices and advancements, without forcing them into doing anything. For example, if the party decides to go to the left instead of the right, you could just switch the rooms around, and they'd ...


2

I had a play experience where I personally elected to make my character unlucky. Statistically, they were designed to always fail every luck-based role, and always get the worst of every situation, for no other reason than 'it would help move things along and make things interesting'. The important thing to note here is that all of this was my decision as ...


2

As most others have said, bad idea. But there can be cases where this can work, and be a good idea. Specifically, where there are in-world reasons for this punishment. But, be careful. If the witch has put a curse on the party to perform the quest or face ill luck, then they might rebel harder, and go off questing for a way to reverse the curse. They might ...


1

I agree with everyone who told you it's a very bad idea, and especially with those who advised you to let the players make the story. Personally, I always think Pen&Paper RPGs should be MMORPGs in most of the cases. As in MMO with story, like you know it from PC games like MineCraft, where you can play whatever strategy you want, in order to get into the ...



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