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71

Short answer: You do not. You say that he does not fit in with your plans as a DM. But the thing about being a DM is NOT that you tell a rigid story that your players walk through: instead you put them in a series of situations, see how they react and frantically try to fit your story to it. I understand that your story is your baby and the PCs all try to ...


39

Being a Killer GM is just as bad as being a Murder-hobo player The only real way to frame this answer is to show it in a similarly inglorious light and hope to highlight why your initial instinct is wrong. As much as players have a responsibility to make their characters interact with the world you create; as a DM you also have a responsibility to actively ...


28

Story issues I think the transformation of your character could well work out the way you described it, but I think for such a basic and deep change to your characters morality and basic alignment you also need a very strong motivator/cause. For Anakin that was fear of the loss of the ones he loves, catalyzed by the death of his mother, a vision of his ...


19

The problem is not the character. That's just a symptom of the problem. Either: The player chose to make a character that didn't fit with what you communicated You failed to communicate sufficiently what the campaign was supposed to be about Notice that in either case, the fictional character isn't really the problem but one of communication and things ...


18

There are two aspects to your question: 1. Character fit for your plans You haven't said much about how this character doesn't fit with your overarching plans. Depending on what that exactly that mismatch is, you have one of three problems: You've insufficiently communicated your game world to your players. Since the game is full of imaginative options, ...


11

You're in quite a difficult situation. Your players don't have information, don't have many leads, have one dead party member, and have been launched into confusion. Slow down the overarching plot of your game - grind it to a halt for now, if you need to. Your players (and their characters) both are not ready for it and do not have the information they ...


9

You would be overreacting. The reason players gather together to play is, of course, wanting to have fun. This should be true for every person in the gaming group including the game master and it should be everyone's responsibility to work towards this goal. If people are entertained they keep coming to games and they positively contribute to them. If not, ...


9

The word that comes to my mind is 'ALLIES'. The ally is an NPC that wants (or needs) the group. They can help in three ways A) Offer themselves to the group as a wandering helper. A person who wants to travel to the city you are going to will welcome the extra security. B) Offer them equipment to help the part. It could be a character's parent (mum!) ...


9

I like the above answers (and comments) but would like to add, for your consideration, the possibility of making this not just about your character's development, but also the other player's character. The other player isn't a sidekick in your character's story -- he's the protagonist of his. Once you've taken into to consideration whether this will work ...


8

So you want the other sword, and you're thinking about your character killing the other PC who has it, though your character is Good(tm) and likes the other PC. Why? Why do you even want it, if you already have one? Why would you start with thinking to kill your friend to get it? Are you an evil player with a Good character? Are you used to games where ...


5

As others have said, killing him is probably a bad move (and in general, trying to railroad your plot too much will probably be frustrating for your players at other times). I'll focus on one part: I have a Warlord PC who does not work with my overarching plans. His backstory also makes no sense as to how he would be level 1 — he's supposed to be a ...


5

Personally, I would not kill a PC on purpose. In my current campaign, there is a cleric of a god whose desire is to be the only god on the world, which involves total extinction of every non-believer. There is also another PC following a different diety in the party. Instead of telling the first player that he should play a different character or follow a ...


5

Killing them off is just asking for problems. They like what they're playing and they probably don't have a problem with it. Throwing him into an unfair combat with the express intent to kill the character might not be your best option. Ultimately you want this player to play a character that is more in the guidelines of what you expect at the table. You ...


4

It sounds like you've got the makings of a good campaign already but don't know how to deal with the point you've reached without railroading the players. If that's so, there really is nothing wrong with a tiny bit of railroading, particularly if (as it seems) the players are floundering a bit and don't know where to turn. In these situations, players are ...


4

The "uncontrolled gestalt" Something many, many players and characters find interesting is the chance to occasionally use an ability from outside their purview - especially when they're a non-magic type getting access to occasional magic. Let the players bearing pieces of the McGuffin occasionally access the shard's power to do something they can't ...


4

It seems like the obvious answer here is to give the characters something that they can ACCOMPLISH. Whatever your motivations for things so far, it's clear that the party is basically battered by events. They feel like they are adrift at the mercy of whatever happens to them. The cure for this is to set up some situations in which the party is clearly in ...


4

The road to hell is paved with good intentions Imagine how much good you can do when you become half-dragon! You can change the world, and people will sing about you as a hero! All you have to do is do this itsy-bitsy one evil step... But then, there will be thousands of good deeds that will pay it back! Right? Right?... Imagine your character repeating ...


2

The first question to ask is, is intra-party conflict the norm in your game? If you're playing something like Paranoia, or if your group just generally expects a certain amount of infighting and backstabbing, then just go for it. For the rest of this answer, I'm assuming that's not the case. That is, your fellow players and GM generally expect the PCs to ...


1

It sounds like you created an Elder Evil of your own and are running it according to the pace at which you set the events to, this is mostly out of the players control as the events are always larger then the players have any clue about. I suggest you add in the "Notice the Sign" checks to give your players knowledge that they would have no ability or clue ...



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