Hot answers tagged

122

You are about to start a new campaign. You need to pause the world and have the same conversation, GM and players, as you would at the beginning of any campaign. What kind of setting is this, what themes will you envision tackling, what's your playstyle? It sounds like you started in a "typical" magic-but-low-tech setting. The setting has now changed. This ...


64

It Will Only Change The World if You Let It - which might be fun How should one DM proceed if his or her group manages to seize control of a superweapon that could change the lives of the entire world? Is it a wise decision to let it roll, or should I take rid of it the sooner I can? First, a rhetorical question. How should a DM proceed if his ...


45

There's always something bigger: pit that against the party. 17th level is pretty high in Pathfinder, but it's far from the level cap. Sure, the party is now capable of vaporizing pretty much anything on land. Even if the disgruntled nations of the world band together to shoot something at the orbital platform like what happened in C&C 3, like a missile ...


41

Having players that are willing to spend time and effort outside of the gaming session preparing and planing is rare, do reward them. I think you should let the LOMC work spectacularly. It works exactly as planned, no side effect just bullseye and one hundred per cent success. Let the LOCM survive the initial use, and be ready to fire again and again and ...


32

Players are often stuck because they simply don't know what they should do. Percival's message deals with player engagement very well, but I'd like to offer a slightly different take on this question. If you can't figure out how the plot might be solved, players definitely won't Players' ingenuity often amazes GMs, but you can't assume they will figure out ...


28

Story issues I think the transformation of your character could well work out the way you described it, but I think for such a basic and deep change to your characters morality and basic alignment you also need a very strong motivator/cause. For Anakin that was fear of the loss of the ones he loves, catalyzed by the death of his mother, a vision of his ...


18

First of all, and I think I speak for everybody, I think that we would LOVE to see the plans your players came up with. Your players are very clever, and it is good to reward them. I'd recommend letting it work - once. However, lay your plans. Taking lessons from the real world, you can see some avenues of response - which recognize what they've done and ...


18

I would say let them have their fun without worrying about it too much. Odds are that they won't return to the superweapon once they've used it this once. The fun is in proving that it CAN work, not using it to stomp every encounter in the future. Anecdotal evidence: I was a part of a group in college that was similar to yours, at least as far as the ...


14

Destroying the cannon after your players worked so hard risks upsetting them and teaching them that they shouldn’t think inventively. There are plenty of plot lines and stories you could run where a super weapon adds nothing to the world dynamic; political machinations, kidnappings and small-scale stuff where subtly is key will render the cannon useless. ...


10

I like the above answers (and comments) but would like to add, for your consideration, the possibility of making this not just about your character's development, but also the other player's character. The other player isn't a sidekick in your character's story -- he's the protagonist of his. Once you've taken into to consideration whether this will work ...


8

I think partly it may be down to how you're setting up the situation and incentivising the players. You haven't told us what the players are doing, their alignments or their aspirations, so if you could add that it would be helpful. My assumption is that your players are all relatively good/neutral characters who are primarily playing DnD to have fun. ...


8

So you want the other sword, and you're thinking about your character killing the other PC who has it, though your character is Good(tm) and likes the other PC. Why? Why do you even want it, if you already have one? Why would you start with thinking to kill your friend to get it? Are you an evil player with a Good character? Are you used to games where ...


6

Turn the cannon against them. Let them build their toy, but toys do not always stay under your control, especially when you acquire the attention of nearly every high-level individual in the realm with your new "thats-no-moon." Let them face the challenge of maintaining control now that they have created the LOMC. All you end up doing is rebalancing the ...


5

There's already a bunch of great answers here, but there's two options I don't see suggested yet. The world doesn't necessarily work the way they think it works. Who says your fantasy world has to be round? You can't get an orbiting cannon if the world is a flat expanse. Or who says that the atmosphere thins out as you get higher up? Maybe it gets hotter ...


5

How should one DM proceed if his or her group manages to seize control of a superweapon that could change the lives of the entire world? Is it a wise decision to let it roll, or should I take rid of it the sooner I can? That depends on what you want to do. In my mind, this is a great setting for a new type of challenge. Your players have, because their ...


4

Don't try and come up with an idea to break it just for the sake of breaking it. If you manage to invent some arbitrary 'oops it blew up' reason to stop them using it, it will just make you look like an ass, especially after they crafted designs using CAD. They came up with an ingenious solution to the problem and it will just look like you're annoyed with ...


4

One the players is a cleric. That cleric is the servant of a god. Said god has been napping on the job a bit and grated all the requests leading up to the building and firing of the cannon. But after the firing, the god sits up and notices. They don't like these mortals messing with things mortals were not ment to mess with. At first I think the cleric ...


4

As you said, the existence of this weapon could change the entire world. So, they need to acknowledge this fact when thinking about their new creation - after all, as conjurers they probably have higher-than-average scores in Int and Wis. Maybe a NPC that is helping them in the creation of this "magic item" can warn them about the risks. Also, their ...


4

The solution I use is let the players do whatever they want, and then act like they did exactly what I expected them to do all along. This tends to work very well for me, mainly because my gaming group has an annoying tendency to to do the one thing I never imagined them thinking of doing. In your case, it sounds like your players are unsure what to do, so ...


4

The road to hell is paved with good intentions Imagine how much good you can do when you become half-dragon! You can change the world, and people will sing about you as a hero! All you have to do is do this itsy-bitsy one evil step... But then, there will be thousands of good deeds that will pay it back! Right? Right?... Imagine your character repeating ...


3

The "uncontrolled gestalt" Something many, many players and characters find interesting is the chance to occasionally use an ability from outside their purview - especially when they're a non-magic type getting access to occasional magic. Let the players bearing pieces of the McGuffin occasionally access the shard's power to do something they can't ...


3

I think 'the dark wanderer' and MC-Hambone have really good answers, but I wanted to add a few more suggestions. I read up on this specific scenario to get an idea of what the players may have missed, so I'll give my suggestions for how to handle it in this specific situation, and possibly how to use these suggestions more generally. Hopefully at least a ...


3

I see 2 options to 'get them back on track' that are simple enough. Add a wandering NPC that can tell them they got off track. Perhaps they know a little something extra like the general location of the point at which the water begins to be poisoned, but not the source. A small bit of info or a hint to keep them from getting bored after they run out of ...


3

You need to actually evaluate the plans your players execute. For example, if the players are following a poisoned river upstream, and randomly decide not to test where the source of the poison is actually coming from, they should definitely find no (or less if there's multiple sources) poison at the next place they test. Because the players missed some ...


2

The first question to ask is, is intra-party conflict the norm in your game? If you're playing something like Paranoia, or if your group just generally expects a certain amount of infighting and backstabbing, then just go for it. For the rest of this answer, I'm assuming that's not the case. That is, your fellow players and GM generally expect the PCs to ...


1

I typically give them an ally, mentor, or sidekick who can make "suggestions" as to what they might try to do next, in case your clues are too obscure or the players are just not getting the hints. But though I hate to say it, you should never have started the adventure when you yourself didn't know how they could get to the plot resolution. You should ...



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