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Making her the BBEG again is probably a bad idea. Others have already stated how tired the cliche is. It is also very, very bad for the players' sense of agency. But what if she's not the BBEG anymore? People do not come back from the dead on their own (sometimes they rise as undead on their own, but that's different). If she's back from the dead, then ...


1

Bringing back old villains - or really, anything - is a really great mechanism, you just need to be careful about how you do it - the key is foreshadowing. In non-rp writing circles, there's an explicitly stated concept called "Conservation of Background Detail." It works just the same in RP planning as it does there. If a detail isn't important (or a red ...


0

Is it too clichéd to bringing her back? I don’t believe being cliché is a reason not to do something in a game. (Risus, for example, is a game built on clichés!) Is there anything I should avoid if I do so? You should avoid invalidating the player characters’ actions. Bringing a dead villain back to life typically does that. Of course, “should ...


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Perhaps you could test the waters by creating a story line where the party finds out that she did take steps to be revived -- some kind of soulstone or something? Then decide as it plays out whether this inspires them to make sure she stays dead or not. In the final battle, perhaps her heir-apparent could emerge. Different, but obviously somewhat similar ...


1

It all depends on the world. Revolving doors world If your players expect their characters can be resurrected if killed, if your world indeed have revolving door of the afterlife, then yes, Big Bad Evil Guy can do it, too. If she was not a total idiot, she probably placed some safeguards to make sure that, if killed, she will not stay dead. If party was ...


1

I would avoid bringing her back. Some players might become unhappy that their efforts to put her down in the first place have been rendered useless and foster a sense of pointlessness to their actions. Some players may also think that you're running of original ideas. I always find that to keep games fresh and interesting you need to keep adding a certain ...


4

First and foremost, I'll assume that your game world does not have either cyberbrains, or re-sleeving or download your brain into machines. Otherwise, clearly you have conquered death and "killing" is not a crash with some data lose. With that in mind... Yes, it is a terrible idea! You cannot (should not?) relive the past. She was a great villain with a ...


19

Execution is Key This is a cliche because a lot of stories do it. A lot of stories do it because done well, it can add something to the story. Done poorly, it just becomes silly and makes the players feel like they don't really have any impact on what's going on. So, think carefully about what you intend to use her for before bringing her back. Don't do it ...


3

You might do it if you (your own words) "spend some time building up" the reasons how she managed to came back to life: some distant unsure clue that the character investigate upon, at first without realising what happened, then disbelieving knowing she's dead, finally realising she really came back and wondering how and why. I.e. you may do it, but it ...


2

This is highly dependent on the "How?". It's often cringe-worthy if it's a Deus Ex Machina type deal, but it can be very good if it is setup in advance. Maybe there are rumors about a cult trying to reincarnate their god, or rumors about dreadful medical experiments. These are mixed with some conspiracy-theorists making unfounded claims, or people claimed ...


2

I agree that there is little chance of solving the problem while you're GMing in this way and, sadly, if you keep doing this you won't be able to find anyone that wants to play the games you're designing. That said, I'd like to submit an approach that was used as the foundation for a campaign world that lasted ten years and at times had three or four groups ...


2

The problem is you are creating when you should be game mastering. The creative itch pulls you into going way farther than is necessary, given the short time frame of your attention during gaming. I would suggest developing one campaign while running another. You can pull in concepts from the developing campaign without tying your development to an actual ...


1

Really I have 3 ideas here. This has already been said, but make shorter campaigns. You get bored quickly and so build the campaigns in a way so that they will be shorter. This lets them get the feeling of completing the campaign as well as giving you less time to get bored. Write a very generic/open ended story. Come up with a solid start then make an ...


3

I'm currently running a mostly-sandbox game in the post-Apocalyptic midwestern United States, although I don't intend to restrict the players should they decide to up and drive to Los Angeles or something. So, I've had to address this issue very recently. Here's how I did it. Plan for where they are The players were new to the world, which is a bit of a ...


1

There is no way to prepare for only and exactly what the players will explore in a sandbox. Two major ways of solving this have emerged over the decades: Prepare Everything The first and most obvious method is to solve the problem with brute force: prepare everything in advance. This is extremely time-consuming, and is a project that few GMs ever actually ...


0

To me these are 2 different things. The rules 3E/3.5E/4E/5E are just rules for how things happen. The campaign and story is independent of these rules (for the most part). I would not throw out both at same time, if the campaign is not working fix it. If its the rules fix it or switch to a diff set of rules, heck mix the rules if you want. The biggest ...


2

I have two suggestions. First: Stop planning the ending. Seriously. What I'm hearing (and I could very well be wrong) is that you get ideas for stories and try to run people through a story - not through a campaign. Let yourself discover what the ending of the campaign is going to be, based on what the players are doing. Let yourself be surprised by ...


4

From my personal experience with the same problem... Being a gamemaster can be very rewarding. Plotting, creating a world full of life and death, and knowing where all of the bodies are buried. It can be intoxicating. But I've also found that it can be stifling. My cure for it was found quite by accident, when I started into narrative style gaming. ...


2

There is a cheesy way out that no one has yet mentioned. Switch to the new campaign, but work in a bridge from the current campaign and pretend they are the same. This can work even if you switch to a new system (you can upgrade the characters in place rather than start new ones). Of course, sometimes the new idea is really incompatible with the old one. ...


4

First, tell the players that you want to end your current campaign but want to give it a proper conclusion. Wrap up your current campaign quickly. You've got an ending in mind; massage the rest of the plans to bring that ending sooner. If necessary, change the final challenge to be more appropriate to lower-level characters. Don't toss in a total deus ex ...


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I'm also a guy who likes to play/run a LOT of different games. What I've done is instead of planning superlong campaigns, I plan short runs: 3-6 session game arcs that folks can play, and finish, relatively quickly. We'll usually play a game, finish, then move to the next game, and come back later if we want to pick it up again. This also works better as ...


2

It looks like there are two interwoven issues here. The first is that you're attracted to a new game system. The second is that you've become bored with the campaign you're currently running, and are feeling like you could create a new campaign that would be more rewarding. The lure of a new game system can be difficult to resist. Our group shifts systems ...


56

So, how do I get out of the vicious circle? Stop doing the thing that's causing it. You diagnosed this yourself: It's probably the worst issue I have as a Game Master, I think of a Game, I write a campaign plot for it, End, Beggining and Middle, get Hyped, Hype my players, and after 2 months I want the story to end, and it's usually too late to make ...


15

I believe that each person at the table is a player. To make this response easy to follow, one of those players will be called the GM, but I just wanted to make this aspect of my response clear up-front. "What is going to happen?" is a big part of play for every person at your table... except you, it seems. With your approach to pre-planning the game, you ...


2

This is an addendum to the existing, perfectly good answers, but I wanted to point out a crucial fact: You ARE allowed to say no. Remember, you're playing the game too. If you're feeling overwhelmed and overworked, it's totally fine to go with a path of lesser resistance. The improv rule about not saying "no" is meant to stop you from shutting down the game, ...


0

General I wrote myself a program that outputs random characters (and one for hunting results). Thats not easy, but for many systems such programs exist on the Internet. As I am also a GM that uses "real" names the namesettings for any region in the world cover the namesettings from a culture in real world (German, Russian, English, Somali...). As there are ...



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