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16

No. Drinking a potion is explicitly an action. Healing Potion:.... Drinking or administering a potion takes an action (PHB 153) You can draw the potion as a part of the action that you use to drink it, but you cannot drink it as a free action. Correction: It seems that the case is quite strong that drinking a potion is a use of the "Use an Object" ...


16

The Bottle The hardest part about this is finding a good bottle. Bottles that look like "potion bottles" aren't that easy to find most of the year. A good prop shop might have them, but often times they're found in antique stores. Another option is LARP (Live Action Roleplaying) stores. They're all about equipment and props, and some will carry potion ...


15

By my reading of the rules, a potion of Lightning Bolt would not be a legal potion. The rules on potions state: The drinker of a potion is both the effective target and the caster of the effect This wording, and the content of the list of potions given makes me believe that only spells with a Target can be put into potions. Lightning Bolt doesn't ...


14

The general rules for potions only say this on the subject: A creature must be able to swallow a potion or smear on an oil. Because of this, incorporeal creatures cannot use potions or oils. Any corporeal creature can imbibe a potion or use an oil. So it seems that the answer is Yes, they can. You can argue that some corporeal but mouthless creatures ...


10

Chemistry supply shops or restaurant/bar supply stores may carry test-tube like vials, and maybe even some corks that will fit. If you don't actually want the players to drink somethink out of them, you can fill them with epoxy resin from a hobby store, and color it with any kind of pigments you like. You could mix glitter, into the expoxy, or even small ...


9

Is it this same Druid? What a troublemaker... Everything I've found relating to this seems to leave the question for the DMG, either implicitly or explicitly. There are a few elements in the PHB that could probably give you some guidance. Foraging for food (PHB, p 183) seems like it would be similar to foraging for herbs, removing that character from the ...


9

Assuming you're limited to just potions, the very best you can do is a CL 15 potion of cure serious wounds. That would heal for 3d8+15, and cost 2250g. This is assuming you can find a level 15 caster to brew them for you. However, if he has an alchemist friend with the Infusion discovery, and his ability allows him to drink extracts, then the best he could ...


8

Magic items almost always take a minimum of a day to craft, but Pathfinder implemented a quick-crafting feature for certain low-level consumables that players are likely to craft a lot of (like first level potions and scrolls of, say, Cure Light Wounds). The 2-hours-per-potion is an exception to the normal rules to allow you to craft cheap potions faster, ...


8

No - Unless you also have 3 Clerics, it'll take 3 days Magic Items creation rules state that: (emphasis mine) Creating an item requires one day per 1,000 gp in the item’s base price, with a minimum of at least one day. Potions are an exception to this rule; they always take just one day to brew. The character must spend the gold and XP at the beginning ...


7

Can a creature with the feat Brew Potion brew multiple potions in a day? No. The Benefit of the feat Brew Potion (PH 89) reads, in part, You can create a potion of any 3rd-level or lower spell that you know and that targets one or more creatures. Brewing a potion takes one day. Emphasis mine. Thus no matter how many times the creature could have ...


7

Don't know if you have a Renaissance fair that comes anywhere nearby, but you'll be able to find many interesting bottles there. You could also try a few stores like "Fantasy Imports" or surprisingly even some dollar stores can have interesting bottles. As far as the contents, I imagine your players would find the concept interesting even if you just used ...


7

Typically uncommon items are only found, not created or purchased. However, this does not preclude you (or whoever the DM is) from providing the player with the brew potion recipe with the recipe he would need to brew an uncommon potion (although the ingredients could potentially be harder to find, more expensive than the potion). Much like many DMs allow ...


6

Here's a few tips. Use recycled glass bottles from beer, hard lemonade, or other types of drinks that don't use plastic bottles. Make sure to strip the paper labels off and wash them well. Save corks from wine bottles, wash them, and use them to seal your glass bottles for an authentic stopper! If you don't have corks, or your corks aren't fitting well, ...


5

Well, a list of spells would be enough, right? Crystalkeep indexes are good. Well, they were before Spell Compendium was released. They got removed from crystalkeep, IIRC, but I still have them and can upload them to Dropbox or somewhere, if needed. Speaking of Crystalkeep, they used to have magic item index as well, potions included. WotC index is a list ...


5

Laying effects can look nice: A very easy and cheap one to make is a Black and Tan, though I'm sure you could do similar things with vegetable oil and coloured water. If you don't mind them not drinking the potions, then playing with viscosity can be fun; Add thicker things to some of the potions, like oil or liquid honey so that they look a bit odd when ...


5

You could borrow from an earlier edition of D&D. In AD&D 2e, to make magic items you had to first get the recipe, which was quite difficult (searching ancient tombs, tracking down a sage and convincing them to answer your questions) or you could research it if you were a Wizard or Priest. Then you'd have to find the materials, and then go through a ...


5

Assuming the player has not used their free object interaction that turn they can fish a potion out, then drink it with the Use an Object action. If a thief does this they can do it as a bonus action. The reason for this is because none of the gear in the equipment section refers to Use an Object. However, the Use an Object action in the combat section ...


4

Lessons from LARP (Live Action Role Players), there are several acceptable alternatives. The white bottles from energy drinks (sans label, print your own), make acceptable (and affordable) potion bottles... 5 hour energy You can get bottles like these in bulk, bulk plastic bottles There is a company that makes mana, health, and luck potions - I bought a ...


3

I would suggest trying the "Legendary Material" Variant that I created for my tables. It's simple, but need some criativity from part of the master and the players. It is a 3-step process, and it goes like this: Step 1: Research The players research a library, buy a scroll from a wanderer, found the schematichs in a stash. Somehow, they are handled a ...


3

The costs assume an eight hour workday, at about an hour per 125gp. But there's a two hour minimum (probably because of set up and clean up) and working on complex (i.e. expensive) potions will shoot your whole day with more complicated setup, ingredients, and procedures.


2

These 2 links are random generators. These generators have been a great help to me in making my own towns, shops, treasure etc. If I had to name a drawback its that by being non system specific they do not have a lot of material from the splats. However, if you have an item you want you can always swap it out with an item of equal value from the ...


2

I am not sure where you are getting that from - both the Core Rulebook and the SRD indicate that it takes one day to craft a potion, period.


2

I'll just address the "is this a good idea?" part of your question, since the rest has been covered elsewhere already. There isn't the same degree of established trust at a con to make a drinkable prop work. Because of that, presenting it would be an imposition on trust that isn't there, which may actually impair the little trust that these people have ...


2

For colour and flavour, use flavour syrups for "make at home" soda machines. Actually, thinking about it, almost anything in the "sauce" aisle at your local supermarket would work. Avoid dairy. If the potion might be sitting on a gaming table for hours you don't want it going off. Unless you are playing Call of Cthulhu, of course.


2

The necromancy spell Deathwine has a reference to undead drinking potions: In addition, any undead creature (or other creature healed by negative energy) that drinks a potion affected by deathwine is healed of 1d8 points of damage. It seems to me that if any rule in the canonical rule set refers to a specific action then the rule set explicitly ...


2

The only thing about potion brewing that master alchemist changes is the highest level of spell you may put in one. All the other limitations on potions are still in effect. For example: Brew Potion Benefit You can create a potion of any [...] spell that you know and that targets one or more creatures. [...] Whoever drinks the potion is ...


2

The general idea that you have is an interesting one, I would caution you to not make it too complicated for players. The point of getting a magic item creation feat is to make it easier to get just the right magic item that you want. If your component rules make it more difficult to craft a magic item than it is to buy it or commission it, then the player ...


1

Prestige Class: Alchemist Savant (This has already been discussed. [MoE pg53]) Familiar/Construct: Improved Familiar 7th lvl; There are homunculus that can be familiars. Might be able to get a Dedicated Wright(Homunculus). Craft Construct Dedicated Wright. You can make multiple of these Constructs. Dedicated ...


1

For the grand effect, you could try adding smoking dry ice. See this primer.



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