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24

A potion of lightning bolt would not be a legal potion. The Feat Brew Potion states which spells can be turned into potions: You can create a potion of any 3rd-level or lower spell that you know and that targets one or more creatures. Lightning bolt doesn't have a Target, only a Range and Area. If you allow potions of lightning bolt anyway, the most ...


24

If a player does something unexpected that's not covered by the rules, just saying "there are no rules, so it does nothing" is the boring way out. That's one of the advantages of roleplaying games over other, more structured games. In our games, the usual ruling for misusing a magic item - breaking/overusing a wand, ingesting a relic, whatever - is to give ...


23

Ok. This is a bit of a tricky one. Potions of Healing, while created of magical substance aren't actually considered magic items. Or are they. They aren't magic items Note, for instance, that they aren't listed as "magic items" in the DM book we've seen so far (BD&D DM Book pp 59-60, v.1). They are listed in the "Adventuring Gear" section of the ...


22

No. Drinking a potion is explicitly an action. Healing Potion:.... Drinking or administering a potion takes an action (PHB 153) You can draw the potion as a part of the action that you use to drink it, but you cannot drink it as a free action. However, it takes an action and cannot be used with the Rogue's Fast Hands ability per the DMG(p141): If ...


20

Cumulative chance does mean that the chance accumulates each time, yes. Each time you drink it after the first, there is a chance that it will age you instead of youth-en you. That chance is 10% initially, but increases by 10% each time. So the first time you drink it, it has its normal effect. The second time, there's a 10% chance it has the opposite ...


20

A Potion of Flying specifically doesn't require concentration. In page 141 of the DMG under "Spells", it specifically mentions potions as an exception to the rule of concentration: ... Many items, such as potions, bypass the casting of a spell and confer the spell's effects, with their usual duration. So, if the potion does not say it requires ...


18

The Bottle The hardest part about this is finding a good bottle. Bottles that look like "potion bottles" aren't that easy to find most of the year. A good prop shop might have them, but often times they're found in antique stores. Another option is LARP (Live Action Roleplaying) stores. They're all about equipment and props, and some will carry potion ...


15

The general rules for potions only say this on the subject: A creature must be able to swallow a potion or smear on an oil. Because of this, incorporeal creatures cannot use potions or oils. Any corporeal creature can imbibe a potion or use an oil. So it seems that the answer is Yes, they can. You can argue that some corporeal but mouthless creatures ...


15

Yes you can have it in your spellbook. You simply have to have access to the spell and make the requisite Spellcraft check. A wizard can also add a spell to her book whenever she encounters one on a magic scroll or in another wizard’s spellbook. No matter what the spell’s source, the wizard must first decipher the magical writing (see Arcane Magical ...


14

Technically, nothing happens. The drinker's chugged what he should've applied, and claiming to have applied the magic oil on the inside doesn't count. (Unless maybe the drinker's a gully dwarf; those dudes can have weaponized innards.) Drinking oil of bless weapon wastes oil of bless weapon just as (in most cases) using oil of bless weapon as a lubricant or ...


11

Chemistry supply shops or restaurant/bar supply stores may carry test-tube like vials, and maybe even some corks that will fit. If you don't actually want the players to drink somethink out of them, you can fill them with epoxy resin from a hobby store, and color it with any kind of pigments you like. You could mix glitter, into the expoxy, or even small ...


11

Drinking/administering a potion takes an action, as you cited from DMG at p.139. That's the general rule in effect, unless specifically contradicted. You note that the DMG's description of the Potion of Healing doesn't mention that it requires an action to consume, and seem to be wondering if that omission is meant to signal something. But every other ...


10

Assuming you're limited to just potions, the very best you can do is a CL 15 potion of cure serious wounds. That would heal for 3d8+15, and cost 2250g. This is assuming you can find a level 15 caster to brew them for you. However, if he has an alchemist friend with the Infusion discovery, and his ability allows him to drink extracts, then the best he could ...


10

Ugh, found my own answer on page 460. Yes, include dexterity modifier if being held by a creature. From that page, emphasis mine: General descriptions include notes on activation, random generation, and other material. The AC, hardness, hit points, and break DC are given for typical examples of some magic items. The AC assumes that the item is ...


9

Magic items almost always take a minimum of a day to craft, but Pathfinder implemented a quick-crafting feature for certain low-level consumables that players are likely to craft a lot of (like first level potions and scrolls of, say, Cure Light Wounds). The 2-hours-per-potion is an exception to the normal rules to allow you to craft cheap potions faster, ...


9

Is it this same Druid? What a troublemaker... Everything I've found relating to this seems to leave the question for the DMG, either implicitly or explicitly. There are a few elements in the PHB that could probably give you some guidance. Foraging for food (PHB, p 183) seems like it would be similar to foraging for herbs, removing that character from the ...


9

Unseen Servant Interacting With An Object Per page 284 of the PHB, 5e, second paragraph of the spell description. "Once on each of your tuns as a bonus action, you can mentally command the servant to move up to 15 feet and interact with an object. The servant can perform simple tasks that a human servant could do, such as fetching things, ...


9

Whatever works in your game is what you should do. If you haven't tried any of these yet to determine what works though… Your first two options I've never seen work. They fail exactly in the ways you predict: the piecemeal benefits are way better than the normal function and it fundamentally changes the role of potions in the game. They don't work, for a ...


9

The feat Potion Glutton does, indeed, say in its normal entry that consuming a potion is a move action, and that's been the subject of some controversy as to whether that's intended or if the feat should be the subject of errata (and here and here). I suspect that the feat's author likely just forgot the actual rule on deadline or accidentally mistyped that ...


8

Can a creature with the feat Brew Potion brew multiple potions in a day? No. The Benefit of the feat Brew Potion (PH 89) reads, in part, You can create a potion of any 3rd-level or lower spell that you know and that targets one or more creatures. Brewing a potion takes one day. Emphasis mine. Thus no matter how many times the creature could have ...


8

No - Unless you also have 3 Clerics, it'll take 3 days Magic Items creation rules state that: (emphasis mine) Creating an item requires one day per 1,000 gp in the item’s base price, with a minimum of at least one day. Potions are an exception to this rule; they always take just one day to brew. The character must spend the gold and XP at the beginning ...


8

Yes and yes. Characters without access to any schools of magic can benefit from those items, too!


8

The DMG lists potions (which are a type of magic item) with the other magic items; the potions are described on pages 187-188. The Systems Reference Document also describes potions, on pages 237-238.


7

Don't know if you have a Renaissance fair that comes anywhere nearby, but you'll be able to find many interesting bottles there. You could also try a few stores like "Fantasy Imports" or surprisingly even some dollar stores can have interesting bottles. As far as the contents, I imagine your players would find the concept interesting even if you just used ...


7

Well, a list of spells would be enough, right? Crystalkeep indexes are good. Well, they were before Spell Compendium was released. They got removed from crystalkeep, IIRC, but I still have them and can upload them to Dropbox or somewhere, if needed. Speaking of Crystalkeep, they used to have magic item index as well, potions included. WotC index is a list ...


7

Typically uncommon items are only found, not created or purchased. However, this does not preclude you (or whoever the DM is) from providing the player with the brew potion recipe with the recipe he would need to brew an uncommon potion (although the ingredients could potentially be harder to find, more expensive than the potion). Much like many DMs allow ...


7

There one general rule for making any potions. And additional one specific rule that applies to the making a Potion of Healing. The first method is to look up the rarity of the potion then turn to pages 128 to 129 in the 5e Dungeon Master Guide. There you will find a minimum level needed by a spell caster to craft the potions along with the creation cost. ...


7

Yes, but only via some finagling. A potion/oil only has one target normally, and the imbiber may not select additional targets even if he would be allowed to normally as the caster of the spell. However, a number of spells that can be made into potions affect creatures other than their direct target(s) in some way. None of the methods of doing this ...


7

RAW, they weigh nothing in 4e. But for a more realistic estimate, we can look at other information we have about potions. I'll be using 3.5 SRD, because it's easily accessible on the web. (Potions don't weigh anything in 3.5e either, but there's still some information in it we can use.) The 3.5 SRD says this about potions: A typical potion or oil ...


7

In both cases, the increase in strength is applied to the creature's strength score. If they did it before: You retain the benefit of any features from your class, race, or other source and can use them if the new form is physically capable of doing so. (PHB p.67) If they did it afterwards, the potion affects the creature normally and as above, ...



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