Hot answers tagged

20

Cumulative chance does mean that the chance accumulates each time, yes. Each time you drink it after the first, there is a chance that it will age you instead of youth-en you. That chance is 10% initially, but increases by 10% each time. So the first time you drink it, it has its normal effect. The second time, there's a 10% chance it has the opposite ...


20

A Potion of Flying specifically doesn't require concentration. In page 141 of the DMG under "Spells", it specifically mentions potions as an exception to the rule of concentration: ... Many items, such as potions, bypass the casting of a spell and confer the spell's effects, with their usual duration. So, if the potion does not say it requires ...


11

Drinking/administering a potion takes an action, as you cited from DMG at p.139. That's the general rule in effect, unless specifically contradicted. You note that the DMG's description of the Potion of Healing doesn't mention that it requires an action to consume, and seem to be wondering if that omission is meant to signal something. But every other ...


10

Ugh, found my own answer on page 460. Yes, include dexterity modifier if being held by a creature. From that page, emphasis mine: General descriptions include notes on activation, random generation, and other material. The AC, hardness, hit points, and break DC are given for typical examples of some magic items. The AC assumes that the item is ...


9

Unseen Servant Interacting With An Object Per page 284 of the PHB, 5e, second paragraph of the spell description. "Once on each of your tuns as a bonus action, you can mentally command the servant to move up to 15 feet and interact with an object. The servant can perform simple tasks that a human servant could do, such as fetching things, ...


8

Yes and yes. Characters without access to any schools of magic can benefit from those items, too!


8

The DMG lists potions (which are a type of magic item) with the other magic items; the potions are described on pages 187-188. The Systems Reference Document also describes potions, on pages 237-238.


7

In both cases, the increase in strength is applied to the creature's strength score. If they did it before: You retain the benefit of any features from your class, race, or other source and can use them if the new form is physically capable of doing so. (PHB p.67) If they did it afterwards, the potion affects the creature normally and as above, ...


7

Whatever works in your game is what you should do. If you haven't tried any of these yet to determine what works though… Your first two options I've never seen work. They fail exactly in the ways you predict: the piecemeal benefits are way better than the normal function and it fundamentally changes the role of potions in the game. They don't work, for a ...


7

Yes, but only via some finagling. A potion/oil only has one target normally, and the imbiber may not select additional targets even if he would be allowed to normally as the caster of the spell. However, a number of spells that can be made into potions affect creatures other than their direct target(s) in some way. None of the methods of doing this ...


7

RAW, they weigh nothing in 4e. But for a more realistic estimate, we can look at other information we have about potions. I'll be using 3.5 SRD, because it's easily accessible on the web. (Potions don't weigh anything in 3.5e either, but there's still some information in it we can use.) The 3.5 SRD says this about potions: A typical potion or oil ...


6

The only thing that a wizard with a prohibited school can't do is actually casting spells from that school. Therefore, the answer to your question is yes. To specify a bit more, the wizard can't: Cast spells of that school using wizard spell slots. Cast spells of that school from scrolls. Cast spells of that school from wands. Cast spells of that school ...


3

The short answer is no. Potions only effect the person that consumes them. The wording " It can duplicate the effect of a spell of up to 3rd level that has a casting time of less than 1 minute and targets one or more creatures or objects." is meant to explain what types of spells can be turned into a potion or an oil with the exception that ...


3

Maybe The way the rules interact is ambiguous, and depends on how one looks at the rules for potionmaking and universal potions. "Yes" Interpretation: "Universal potions are potions" Universal potions are, in their class feature, defined as "a potion." Brew Potion can be used to make all items in the subset of "potions," so it would work fine with ...


2

The limits would ultimately be up to your GM. But consider this: Your familiar has an empathic link to you, would know that you are in danger and need assistance. Your familiar is intelligent and can make its own decisions. Your familiar would be familiar with equipment you have and could know what it is capable of, depending on dialogue with your ...


1

Despite the implication in the herbalism kit description that potions of healing and antidotes can be created via the kit, the PHB crafting rules under downtime activity are clearly reserved for non-magical items. The PHB indicates a potion of healing is a magic item; it is italicized for this reason in the list of adventuring gear as well as explicitly ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible