Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

The Bottle The hardest part about this is finding a good bottle. Bottles that look like "potion bottles" aren't that easy to find most of the year. A good prop shop might have them, but often times they're found in antique stores. Another option is LARP (Live Action Roleplaying) stores. They're all about equipment and props, and some will carry potion ...


10

Chemistry supply shops or restaurant/bar supply stores may carry test-tube like vials, and maybe even some corks that will fit. If you don't actually want the players to drink somethink out of them, you can fill them with epoxy resin from a hobby store, and color it with any kind of pigments you like. You could mix glitter, into the expoxy, or even small ...


8

Assuming you're limited to just potions, the very best you can do is a CL 15 potion of cure serious wounds. That would heal for 3d8+15, and cost 2250g. This is assuming you can find a level 15 caster to brew them for you. However, if he has an alchemist friend with the Infusion discovery, and his ability allows him to drink extracts, then the best he could ...


7

Don't know if you have a Renaissance fair that comes anywhere nearby, but you'll be able to find many interesting bottles there. You could also try a few stores like "Fantasy Imports" or surprisingly even some dollar stores can have interesting bottles. As far as the contents, I imagine your players would find the concept interesting even if you just used ...


6

Here's a few tips. Use recycled glass bottles from beer, hard lemonade, or other types of drinks that don't use plastic bottles. Make sure to strip the paper labels off and wash them well. Save corks from wine bottles, wash them, and use them to seal your glass bottles for an authentic stopper! If you don't have corks, or your corks aren't fitting well, ...


5

Laying effects can look nice: A very easy and cheap one to make is a Black and Tan, though I'm sure you could do similar things with vegetable oil and coloured water. If you don't mind them not drinking the potions, then playing with viscosity can be fun; Add thicker things to some of the potions, like oil or liquid honey so that they look a bit odd when ...


4

You could borrow from an earlier edition of D&D. In AD&D 2e, to make magic items you had to first get the recipe, which was quite difficult (searching ancient tombs, tracking down a sage and convincing them to answer your questions) or you could research it if you were a Wizard or Priest. Then you'd have to find the materials, and then go through a ...


4

Lessons from LARP (Live Action Role Players), there are several acceptable alternatives. The white bottles from energy drinks (sans label, print your own), make acceptable (and affordable) potion bottles... 5 hour energy You can get bottles like these in bulk, bulk plastic bottles There is a company that makes mana, health, and luck potions - I bought a ...


2

For colour and flavour, use flavour syrups for "make at home" soda machines. Actually, thinking about it, almost anything in the "sauce" aisle at your local supermarket would work. Avoid dairy. If the potion might be sitting on a gaming table for hours you don't want it going off. Unless you are playing Call of Cthulhu, of course.


2

I would suggest trying the "Legendary Material" Variant that I created for my tables. It's simple, but need some criativity from part of the master and the players. It is a 3-step process, and it goes like this: Step 1: Research The players research a library, buy a scroll from a wanderer, found the schematichs in a stash. Somehow, they are handled a ...


1

I'll just address the "is this a good idea?" part of your question, since the rest has been covered elsewhere already. There isn't the same degree of established trust at a con to make a drinkable prop work. Because of that, presenting it would be an imposition on trust that isn't there, which may actually impair the little trust that these people have ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible