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51

Play to your other players' strengths Your barbarian, as you have noted, is very good at dealing high damage to a single target. Maybe even two targets if he took cleave. The aim now is to play to the strengths of the other party members as well. A swarm of 8-10 rats would be easier for a mage with burning hands or sleep than the barbarian. An incorporeal ...


50

Your issue has nothing to do with your Barbarian and his Strength. I assume you're talking about the encounter "Flat on Rat Street" from the adventure Shadow in the Sky in the Second Darkness Adventure Path. I ran that for my party too. They killed the baboon in one hit, downed the loan shark in one hit, and spent the rest of the time with him tied to a ...


45

Don't make all of the bosses suddenly immune, but you can certainly add in strong henchmen with immunities. If I were a big baddie in your campaign (and had a pulse) then I'd be recruiting bodyguards who didn't care about con damage. Especially if the PCs aren't shy about their strategy. Even if so, some divination here and there wouldn't be game-breaking. ...


37

Does he know there's a problem? There are plenty of mechanical ways to limit his character, but bear in mind that you may wind up moving the frustration from yourselves over to him. And if he's at all smart, he's going to recognize what's going on. My generic answer for problem behavior is "talk to the guy," which is harder but often more effective. I ...


35

First (assuming your PCs are using poison to do this, but I wish you would clarify this in your question), make sure you understand the poison stacking rules - if you suddenly hit someone with three doses of a 1d3 CON poison (or the spell poison) they are NOT taking 3d3 points of CON a round; they're taking 1d3 with a +4 to the DC and double duration. ...


29

Spice up the plot with non-violent encounters in which weaponry is not an asset. Use multi-threat encounters where one character just cannot defeat all opponents. Any artifical hurdles can easily backfire if the player feels he is being unfairly targeted by the DM.


29

This is not a great answer This is a very general question, with a specific example given, and this answer addresses the example very specifically. I think there are lessons that can be drawn from this answer, and I think this answer is probably useful to the question-asker, but it may not be as helpful to others with the same question, which was part of ...


25

A few thoughts: I had a friend who played a weekly pick-up game, he showed up every week, everyone else showed up much less frequently. They all started at Level 1, soon enough he was level 15, most of the rest were somewhere around level 8-10. It was decided that his character should bow out gracefully and he should make a new one (if your DM will allow ...


23

Ask him to leave While there are ways to create a social contract within a group, your problems sound severe. In many ways, it sounds like your objectives for playing and his objectives are quite different. When that happens, the best thing to do is to ask him to leave. My recommendation would be to phrase the request around the core of: "I'm sorry, but I ...


20

The first recommendation I have is to limit the availability of the poison. Your party has accrued a nasty reputation and merchants are reluctant to sell the reagents necessary. Your party is so renowned for using poisons as a method that the enemy keeps antidotes on hand. Regardless of the party's reputation, the boss sends some thieves in and steals the ...


19

I'm gonna be the dissenting voice here, perhaps. I think there's definitely some kind of communication problem in your group. However, I also think he's playing more or less fine D&D. Stuff that is his problem Not being aware that he's annoying you. Being "too helpful" to your girlfriend so that she turtles. Not taking "what's good for the goose is ...


12

Ask him nicely, make him an NPC/GM, and if those two things don't work, ask him to leave This isn't an in-game problem. This is a player problem. The first approach is "I commend you on your ingenuity, but your current player is making the game less fun for everyone. Shall we work on a way of making him an NPC (that you can play on occasion) but statting up ...


12

None of them The character that before errata that could drop Orcus was the blood mage with blood pulse, a power that inflicts damage based on the enemy moving (see discussions one, two). When discussing the present "state of the art" it is also important to clarify which Orcus, as there are many versions. For high DPR builds, look here. But I doubt any ...


12

You can do a very nice trick. Talk with him and with his consent entrap him into a lesser character. In normal gameplay, the player plays the lesser character. However, once per day, he can try to "morph" back into his (e.g.) human form for a reduced amount of time (like one or two hours, with increasing difficulty for every additional hour to keep staying ...


10

I'm not a power gamer myself That may be part of the problem. You appear to want a game that is ill-suited to power gaming, while he seems to want very much to min/max, optimize, and otherwise employ power gaming techniques. Maybe the two of you need to discuss what sort of game each of you wants, and bring the other players into the conversation as ...


10

Tell your Referee to throw a bit more varied challenges at you. If every encounter happens at circumstances where you can just run up punch their face off, then it is a dull campaign, not a dull character. When you're facing a sniper 800 meters away with your head in the crosshairs, you will see that things will get a lot more interesting. Tell your Referee ...


10

Level 1 is, by far, the best time to be a barbarian. This issue will almost certainly go away quickly after you get a few levels. It may be appropriate to allow the player to be very strong now. While that doesn’t mean the other players should be bored (and there are a lot of good suggestions here about things for them in other answers), don’t take away the ...


9

Ok, first of all I'd like to say that making characters like this is one of the main reasons I role play, so I'll be trying to come at this from both sides where possible. The first problem is the power divide. The best way I've found of dealing with this is with making time the biggest problem. Unless they have some way of manipulating time it is usually ...


9

GM's Mistakes 1) mixing a lead-actor type with a group of newbs. It's a recipe for disaster, unless the newbs are also lead-actor types. The personality type involved NEEDS to be center stage... and will walk all over other players, even if they're the newb and the other players are simply "normal"... Mind you, run for a group of 3-4 of these types, and you ...


9

If I have a character that does or seems to outstrip the other characters in terms of effectiveness, how can I adjust to at least mitigate the resulting problems (over and done encounters, PC envy)? Here's a different point of view because I like down votes: It is not your problem but that of the GM. They are the ones that should provide ...


8

If the guy likes a challenge, ask him to play and optimize substandard builds via awkward race/class combinations or weird flavors and themes. The artificial handicap is optional and can scratch the powergamer itch without blowing away the other party members. Doing this may edge him into more RP interesting characters as well.


8

There are some things you can change, and some things you could ask your GM/group to change. Adjusting the way your character is built might not be possible - that's not something Cyberpunk is good at, and I assume you want a crazy-good brawler anyway, so crippling the character is counterproductive. Maybe one of these would help... 1) Play him differently. ...


6

There's really only a limited number of ways to "fix" an overpowered combat character. The limiting factor here is the rest of your group... If the GM powers up your adversaries to your level, the rest of the group will be in trouble. If the GM tailors every encounter to combating you, the rest of the group will start to feel marginalized. With that said, ...


6

Build the encounters to match your player group. If you have 4 decent players and one power gamer throw in a group of weaker enemies with a powerful leader. Such that the power gamer has no choice but to engage the more powerful enemy while the others take care of the others. Perhaps a group of skeletons being bossed around by a Skeleton Warrior, or a Lich, ...


6

Make sure your campaign isn't all about combat. Have situations where even if you kill everything the problem/issue isn't resolved. Also provides some context for all the characters. For example a cleric would be associated with a temple, an ex-navy engineer have some navy buddies. By playing to each of the character's backgrounds in turn you create ...


6

Traps. I don't know if you do much role playing as well as combat, but a Raging barbarian probably shouldn't take time to consider if he should chase down the fleeing kobolds. I had a DM once who loved to do this with kobolds. They'd run in, fight for a couple of rounds and run away. If you chased them there were always one or two traps. With your loan ...


6

Another option is to use the story to both protect your bosses and raise the challenge instead of relying (exclusively) on a system-based solution. Sure, as others have pointed out, the bosses might get wind of the PCs' tactics and prepare and ready combat countermeasures - but you can, if it fits your RPing style, go for a subtler approach as well. It ...


5

If you're playing with a system that rewards character optimization, I don't understand how "power gaming" - within the letter and spirit of the rules - isn't simply good play. Why would you penalize a player for intelligent use of the rules? Would you penalize a player who's a good combat strategist just because the other players aren't as good at it? It ...


5

Magic is your friend against Barbarians. He has a huge initiative buff? That's nice. Your wizard pre-cast haste on himself. He has a huge modifier to hit? That's nice. Your wizard has Hold Person (or any other number of disabling 2nd level spells) He can slay hordes upon hordes of monsters with his battelaxe? That's nice. Your wizard has a few ...


5

Undead and Constructs are both immune to ability damage and drain (not to mention poisons and disease). Using creatures of those types will remove this strategy as a viable option. Once the players have moved on, you can go back to normal critters...



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