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36

Does he know there's a problem? There are plenty of mechanical ways to limit his character, but bear in mind that you may wind up moving the frustration from yourselves over to him. And if he's at all smart, he's going to recognize what's going on. My generic answer for problem behavior is "talk to the guy," which is harder but often more effective. I ...


20

As of December 2010, here is a list of leaders. Thinking about the Art of Leading, or the art of healing, there is a third category "damage directly prevented." Therefore, the following list will assess how much damage has been ameliorated over the course of an encounter, looking at every leader class, but only the "best" damage ameliorator of the class. ...


20

Ask him to leave While there are ways to create a social contract within a group, your problems sound severe. In many ways, it sounds like your objectives for playing and his objectives are quite different. When that happens, the best thing to do is to ask him to leave. My recommendation would be to phrase the request around the core of: "I'm sorry, but I ...


19

D&D 3.5 actually has rules for this sort of thing: Unearthed Arcana's character traits and character flaws systems. Traits give you a small bonus for a small penalty. For example, for a fey who can't lie, you might use the Honest trait: +1 Diplomacy, -1 Bluff and Sense Motive. Flaws give you a bonus feat in exchange for a significant non-story penalty. ...


18

I'm gonna be the dissenting voice here, perhaps. I think there's definitely some kind of communication problem in your group. However, I also think he's playing more or less fine D&D. Stuff that is his problem Not being aware that he's annoying you. Being "too helpful" to your girlfriend so that she turtles. Not taking "what's good for the goose is ...


14

Well, there are a couple of things you can do. First of all, keep in mind that a strict reading of the power suggests that the enemy must be within 5 squares before moving closer, but I admit that there is some room for interpretation. Second, keep in mind that this is an immediate reaction and therefore the ranger only gets to make one of these attacks in ...


12

You can do a very nice trick. Talk with him and with his consent entrap him into a lesser character. In normal gameplay, the player plays the lesser character. However, once per day, he can try to "morph" back into his (e.g.) human form for a reduced amount of time (like one or two hours, with increasing difficulty for every additional hour to keep staying ...


12

That is a very hard question to answer, because it depends on tier and what you mean by the numbers. However, here are my leading candidates. Cleric. The cleric has more utility heals than any other class, and its heals are bigger. You can't overestimate the power of adding the Wisdom modifier to most of your heals, plus the cleric has an at-will that ...


12

None of them The character that before errata that could drop Orcus was the blood mage with blood pulse, a power that inflicts damage based on the enemy moving (see discussions one, two). When discussing the present "state of the art" it is also important to clarify which Orcus, as there are many versions. For high DPR builds, look here. But I doubt any ...


12

Ask him nicely, make him an NPC/GM, and if those two things don't work, ask him to leave This isn't an in-game problem. This is a player problem. The first approach is "I commend you on your ingenuity, but your current player is making the game less fun for everyone. Shall we work on a way of making him an NPC (that you can play on occasion) but statting up ...


11

If you actually get a standard distribution from the dice in the 3d6 x12 method, it will be slightly better than a standard distribution of results from the 4d6 method. The more samples you take, the more likely it is that you will get something approaching average or a standard distribution. The fewer samples you take, the more likely the results will just ...


11

There is no fundamental guide on "numbers of powers" as that doesn't exist on this level of abstraction. However, there are ways to quantify most of what a controller/leader does and apply it to the concept of party-as-character for purposes of optimization. Let us start with the most difficult to classify, controllers. (And some theory) While the other ...


10

I'm not a power gamer myself That may be part of the problem. You appear to want a game that is ill-suited to power gaming, while he seems to want very much to min/max, optimize, and otherwise employ power gaming techniques. Maybe the two of you need to discuss what sort of game each of you wants, and bring the other players into the conversation as ...


10

Choosing a ridiculously over powered race is important. There is no level adjustment in 1E Svirfneblin, Drow and Derro all gain innate spell casting powers, numerous bonuses and magic resistance! Dragonlance Minotaurs gain enourmous Str and Con. The first edition Bard is also tasty... but I can't beleive no one mentioned Psionics. Stupid and arbitary ...


9

If you haven't taken the Toughness feat, I recommend it -- at the beginning of each tier, it's 10% of your total hit points, which is not bad. Also think about Durable if your problem is running out of surges. Battle Healer is also quite good, since it gives you a bit of healing every time you heal someone else. Dwarf Battle Priest would do the same thing, ...


9

Ok, first of all I'd like to say that making characters like this is one of the main reasons I role play, so I'll be trying to come at this from both sides where possible. The first problem is the power divide. The best way I've found of dealing with this is with making time the biggest problem. Unless they have some way of manipulating time it is usually ...


8

If the guy likes a challenge, ask him to play and optimize substandard builds via awkward race/class combinations or weird flavors and themes. The artificial handicap is optional and can scratch the powergamer itch without blowing away the other party members. Doing this may edge him into more RP interesting characters as well.


8

I won a AD&D fight tournament back in the mid 80s with a high level Druid and a selection of Magic Items. I picked it because the combination of the Druid's special powers and items made for a pretty broken combination. Special abilities + can use a scimatar + adequate spell casting (including entangle and other movement hindering spells) + the right ...


8

GM's Mistakes 1) mixing a lead-actor type with a group of newbs. It's a recipe for disaster, unless the newbs are also lead-actor types. The personality type involved NEEDS to be center stage... and will walk all over other players, even if they're the newb and the other players are simply "normal"... Mind you, run for a group of 3-4 of these types, and you ...


8

As to the question, I think if your motives are honest there's nothing "unfair" about it, no. If I was your DM I'd worry most about your place in the party. With a relatively more powerful character and a bunch of traits that, if role-played honestly, could easily drop the rest of the PC's right in it, how popular do you think your character is going to be ...


7

It depends on what you are looking for specifically. These weapon groups are generally the "best" for non-specialized builds. The other weapon groups do not have nearly the same power and/or feat support.. Heavy blades have the best proficiency bonus, this will lead to more hits and great DPR. As a fighter it will also help you enforce your mark by ...


7

For a strictly powergaming answer, of course, you save it for the biggest battle. The "rage-Boost" effect (by which your at-will powers and encounter powers are suddenly getting bonuses due to rage) means - if your'e going to rage, do it as early in the combat as possible. Round 1 if possible. Second thing: You are a raging madman, but don't hold back from ...


7

Tell your Referee to throw a bit more varied challenges at you. If every encounter happens at circumstances where you can just run up punch their face off, then it is a dull campaign, not a dull character. When you're facing a sniper 800 meters away with your head in the crosshairs, you will see that things will get a lot more interesting. Tell your Referee ...


7

Can't hurt to ask. It's not bad form per se to ask for dispensations, tweaks to the rules, etc., it's common practice. GMs vary in style widely, however. The response to a query like this could be anywhere from an enthusiastic "Oh yeah and you steal people's teeth at night too, +1 to Intimidate but you've got to steal a tooth a week or yours start falling ...


7

Start With a Goal in Mind Optimization in Pathfinder can be class-based, but more often it's goal-based; you want to create a powerful archer, or control the battlefield, or have the smoothest talker to ever talk smoothly. Start with a mechanical goal, since we're talking mechanics, and that'll give you something to focus around for your initial ...


7

Optimisation is a game of requirements generation, and quantifying measures of those requirements to test success or failure. The more accurate your requirements, the more accurate the end character. As I write in, Constrained Optimization in Dungeons and Dragons: A Theory of Requirements Generation for Effective Character Creation: The articulation of ...


6

As everyone else has stated, 12 rolls of 3d6 is better. You guys writing hundreds of lines of dice code... I love the web-based tool for Troll for dice calculations. Here's Troll code for best six of 12 rolls of 3d6: sum (largest 6 12#(sum 3d6)) This averages in a total score around 76.4. And the Troll code for six rolls of 4d6 keeping the best 3d6: ...


6

Most old schoolers curse Unearthed Arcana, because most of the player classes within (particularly, as mentioned, the Barbarian) are far more powerful than classes in the regular Players Handbook. Weapon specialization, particularly the dreaded double specialization can be ridiculous when applied to bows. An elf with a bow and double specialization (if ...


6

Honestly, the Hackmaster Gamemaster's Guide is full of cheese, and is almost completely compatible with 1st Ed. AD&D, that being the system it is largely based on. Ridiculous magic items can bridge any gap in ability scores early on. If you're looking to really push your AD&D over the top, I can think of no better reference or inspiration.



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