Hot answers tagged

191

Reward him. Your player is playing his character smart, not hard. He's being clever and resourceful. He's considering what his character would do in character. I wish I had players like the one playing your Bard. He stops to think about what he can do, instead of just mindlessly deciding you expect him to attack and attacking. You can do so much more with ...


187

"It's what my guy would do!" "My Guy" syndrome is when — often unwittingly — you disclaim decision-making power and responsibility by acting like "what my character would do" is inevitable and inviolable, even if it gets in the way of actually having fun in the game or being able to play the game at all. JD Corley wrote up a story that covers it pretty ...


131

Don't run the campaign It is often important (but not always) for the party to have a preexisting, long term reason to stay a party. It is especially important in situations like this, with non-standard parties. Unless that reason is part of your pitch, it is incumbent upon the players to come up with that reason. Your Options Make it a One-Shot So you ...


125

The folding boat explicitly says that it takes an action to speak the command word. If your player is using his action to cast catapult, he doesn't have an action left to properly incant the command word before the attack finishes. The catapult spell says that it targets an item weighing "1 to 5" pounds, and it propels the target "in a straight line". This ...


106

I wasn't comfortable with some assumptions people are readily making in their comments, so I did some research and a few calculations. I also incorporated some suggestions made in the comments. The crushing weight of the earth He digs a hole big enough for himself (between 3-4 feet deep) Lots of people claim he'd have trouble breathing, which is ...


105

You I'll deal with your issues first: you are an angry 14 year old. Don't sweat it; everybody was, is or will be. Maturity can in fact be summed up as learning not to punch the face of someone who richly deserves it. You have to remember that you have no control over the way other people behave; you only have control over the way you behave. And ... you ...


101

No, it's not fair to punish a player in this way. But it's not okay for this player to take an unfair share of control over the game, either. You are the DM — you are in control. You are in the Big Chair, and the group put you there to be responsible for pacing and mediation. You have that job because players striving for the benefit of their PC is fun but ...


97

The obvious solution would be to go to the authorities (the city guard?) with your evidence. They're certainly searching for the villain who burned down all those inns and killed all those people. Come back with twenty or thirty NPC archers and shoot him full of arrows. If you try doing this, you're going to have two problems. The first problem is that ...


93

"Fine, then we just won't play." "OK." Call their bluff, whether you think it's a bluff or not. If they're bluffing, they do want to play and will buckle down and figure it out if they have to. If they're not bluffing, they don't really want to play anyway and you've dodged a bullet. (GMing for a group that doesn't really want to play is a ...


92

Let them No seriously, let them. They want to keep the McGuffin of doom, the schematics to the bank that the Johnson asked them to get, the sacred Rhino of the city? Let them keep them. They're seriously writing plot for you right here, don't speak to them as a GM saying "If you do that, X..." they're experienced runners now; this is fine at the start ...


89

Alright, it sounds like you have a lot of problems going on here that I'm going to address individually using the ruleset that you've chosen for your game. First off, you're being taken advantage of. There's no easy way to say this, but your friend is attempting to take advantage of you during the course of this game that you're playing. An item to double ...


84

I certainly wouldn’t stand for it. Being the odd-man-out in that kind of situation should be an opportunity for interesting roleplay and add characterization to your character, your allies, and the NPCs, based on how they handle it. But it sounds like you were completely side-lined the entire time and prevented from doing that roleplay. If you ...


83

Bit of an introductory story: I got a discount from my phone company for retention, by threatening to cancel. My neighbour also threatened to cancel after hearing about my discount, but didn't get an offer. Why? He wasn't serious about leaving, and they caught on. I was. If someone knows you won't pull the trigger, they do not have a reason to change what ...


83

He won't get any sleep, and then he'll die. I get the impression this player hasn't ever tried to sit on the ground for a while in an undeveloped area. There's all manner of creepy crawlies out there. His bedroll will get damp and then it'll get full of bugs--whether they're upset or happy or indifferent about his presence, they'll be omnipresent. Good luck ...


82

You're not going to like it, but I would let him walk. Having a player on his phone breaks immersion for everyone else, and he's said outright that he'd rather leave than put down the phone. Tell him that you don't want to sour the friendship, but that you're not ok running a campaign where people have phones out at the table. And then offer to hang out ...


78

You say "Before he or any of the others had a chance to pick it up, the controlling player snatched it up and refused to give it back (Even though she had no use for it)." I feel like I can identify 2 problems from this sentence. First of all, how are you allowing her to pick it up without anyone else being allowed an "action"? Just because a player says ...


76

Sometimes, clever and creative players are a pain, because you planned for something very different. Yet, it is the clever and creative play that makes the game so rewarding. Instead of getting the player to adapt to your plans, I suggest you adapt your plans to the player. Make going to the authorities interesting If the authorities are always helpful, or ...


73

Use scouts Digging and building mineshafts is very easy to detect for even a casual observer. The BBEG can wait until the druid has wasted a bunch of his spells, then show up and bury the intruders in the grave they just dug. If it's an ambush, the PCs won't be able to teleport away without taking a few hits, and if they have a reputation for being flighty, ...


73

Oh, there's a few ways you can tackle this. 1. Be a rules lawyer Catapult says it does 3d8 damage. So it does 3d8 damage. RAW. It's crude but efficient. The downside is that it's not very much fun. 2. Be realistic - even if they don't want you to be. This is my preferred option, because it (a) does reward them for being creative, and then (b) punishes them ...


71

Short answer: You do not. You say that he does not fit in with your plans as a DM. But the thing about being a DM is NOT that you tell a rigid story that your players walk through: instead you put them in a series of situations, see how they react and frantically try to fit your story to it. I understand that your story is your baby and the PCs all try to ...


69

Different players get different things out of gaming. Unfortunately, some people's gaming styles mean that their fun comes at the expense of others'. Often in a case like this, the player either wants more attention than the other players or, via their outlier character, wants their character to constrain/implicitly control the rest of the group. This is ...


68

It sounds to me like an expectation problem. You should easily be able to resolve it by asking the player why they feel the need to say those things. Once you figure out why, you can do something about it. Although my suspicion is that the player is used to a GM vs Players style of gaming and thus covers all his bases because otherwise, they get picked on. ...


66

Maybe he's a Watcher In the Dungeons and Dragons 4th Edition book "Dungeon Master's Guide" there exists some very useful advice for running the game that is applicable to nearly every RPG out there. One section of advice addresses different player personalities, including the idea of "the Watcher." A watcher is a casual player who comes to the game ...


64

Don't save the character As long as you keep saving Bob's character and he has fun acting this way, he'll keep this behavior. First thing that needs to be done is to make him accountable for the consequences of his decisions. Of course this will cost you some plot that will be ruined when the party dies, but in the long run it will worth the effort. ...


61

The first thing you need to do is talk to the player again. Explain, in neutral and non-accusatory terms, why his use of the phone is frustrating to you as the GM. Have examples ready, in case he says it's not affecting anyone - for example, "When your turn comes up, I have to spend time reminding you of what's going on, even though everyone else already ...


59

To be clear, he's asking for details on these samples he's collecting? I would say if he's that interested in a detailed list, then have him make it up himself. You would have to approve, of course, but just say something like, "You collect a variety of samples to help with your research. Go ahead and make a list of samples that you think would be ...


56

Because it's so much easier to bury yourself and your party properly. This does require some resources, but they can basically be gathered from the surrounding forest. Kearny's Nuclear War Survival Skills is an astonishingly good reference. For this purpose, your player will be interested in the pole covered trench shelter (Chapter 5). It provides plans ...


54

Deputize Him If the character is breaking the game context by going to the authorities, make him into the authority. Have the duke/mayor/whatever declare the party to be an "elite troubleshooting squad," give them fancy badges and the authority to do things. Now they can recruit people into militias and buy better swords out of the petty cash, but they ...


54

"OK, you're refusing to accept the rules of the universe. What are the rest of you doing while he is arguing with the universe?" It really is that simple. You do not have to justify your rulings to him, and every time you argue with him you strengthen the impression (for him and the rest of the group) that his way is the only way to play, which would be ...


52

Have a discussion with the player, privately and not during game time. Acknowledge you invited him without discussing what the groups expectations of him were. Try to have the missing discussion with him. In the discussion point out how his current play style does not fit the groups desired play style. At the end of the discussion ask him to conform to ...



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