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0

http://thealexandrian.net/wordpress/8406/roleplaying-games/thought-of-the-day-are-you-sure-you-want-to-do-that If your players are suggesting something which is self-evidently suicidal to the GM, then there has probably been some sort of miscommunication. It’s generally preferable to actually explain your understanding of the stakes to the player to make ...


1

Use "Yes, and..." or "yes, but..." Reacting quickly is perfectly sensible! However, it shouldn't mean that no-one else gets to find out what's going on. If the wall collapsing is primarily narration and wasn't going to trap the players anyway, I would go with something like: GM: You hear a cracking sound- PC: I dive out of the way. GM: OK. The collapsing ...


14

I'm going straight for the kill. Remove Him From The Group There doesn't seem to be any other applicable answer. The biggest red flag here is that he has already been talked to and ignored the feelings of the rest of the party. This is a major no-no in RPing, at least in my groups. Ignoring the next portion of my answer, this alone is the main reason they ...


3

While you might feel like you're on your last resort right now, this really isn't the case. Your options presented might feel very definitive, but this really isn't the case. Killing his character I.E. forcing him to play a new character. This is not recommended. It would only solve your problem if the problem is the character's behavior, and even then, ...


7

"All-Consuming Motivations" The first issue is that most people in real life, and honestly, a great number of fictional characters in media, aren't running on "all-consuming motivations". They may have strong motivations (which is usually key in media), but these motivations are also tempered or given challenge by other motivations characters consider ...


1

There are many good nuggets of information above. One thing I would like to add that I haven't seen is Use Pre-Builts/Templates. Spend half of the points for them so it steers each character in a certain direction, but allows them some freedom to make it their own special brand of "weird". I've found this especially useful in games that require niches to ...


0

Before character generation, communicate to them clearly what theme you are going for. They can not make characters when they aren't aware of what to expect. Give them restrictions on character creation. Give them a list of properties their characters must have or must not have. The most extreme restriction would be to design some player-characters yourself ...


4

The Same Page tool is often wheeled out as the solution to this type of problem, and it is extremely good at what it does. However, I wanted to talk in more general terms about what needs to happen here. If you have decided on a tone and theme to the game you want to run, you need to... Communicate this as clearly as you can to your players before you do ...


1

Here is what I do, if the players have gone badly off-script and are about to tackle an encounter that is way too tough for them: I step out of character and I address them directly, and I say: "Hey, here's a warning: you're doing stuff the book assumed you wouldn't do, and this is going to be a really tough battle. Are you sure you want to do this?" ...


7

Talk to your players and ensure that everyone is on The Same Page Your players may be creating characters contrary to your setting because they may not realize that your style of GMing is not the same as another game they have played in. Making a Socialite Noble bard in a kick-in-the-door style of game, or a Lich Wizard in a Good aligned campaign are going ...


-5

This sounds like the fault of all the coddling games (and silly action movies) of recent years, not your fault. It also sounds like the players do want to actually play a game with real risks. They're just learning what that feels like. Maybe they'll be more careful next time. I'd keep giving them an actual game with actual choices and actual cause and ...


1

1 Both players were really pissed that they got wounded and lost interest in the game. This does not appear to agree with this, 2 I asked them if they wanted a more cinematic battle where they are the heroes, but altogether they said that the current style (it's dark, rough and dangerous) is what they wanted to play. At risk of sounding like a ...


0

Kill him. Not the player, the character. You are the DM, you are emulating the things for him. If he wants combat, here is the time to find him a stronger enemy. If he wants always the stronger stats, allow him to reach it - but give him more stronger problems, too. He want to play a character, who is super-optimized, here is the time to give him ...


4

You may be playing it exactly right. They got upset when something bad happened to them. Different people handle this in different ways. Your guys got bummed out and withdrew a bit. They recovered and got interested in the game again. It at least shows they're quite attached to their characters. The way to tell if you've done it right is notice if the ...


25

It seems as though the issue here is not that your players were upset by the fact that their characters died, it's that your players were upset by the fact that their characters died even though they wanted to play a "dark, rough, and dangerous" game in which their characters were at risk of dying. Sometimes, people just get upset. Psychology is an odd ...


4

Experiment The way it looks like now, your players don't seem to know what they really want. Therefore, you should experiment. Prepare a session that's extremely grim and dangerous, and another one where they can come out as heroes. This way, judging from their reactions, you can decide for them what they really want. If you want, you could inform them of ...


0

I think the answer to 1-5 question is yes, it is appropriate if critiques are made in an assertive, constructive and positive way. But you must keep in mind that even well intentioned and well exposed critiques can hurt feelings, or make someone, if not angry, sad. So, I usually keep critiques to myself unless: The person have explicitly asked for them, ...


-1

You have put a lot of stuff into your question and I have broken it into a number of more concise questions: 1. Is it appropriate for a GM to critique "poor play"? Yes. The GM in a RPG serves a number of functions: a) creator and player of the world b) impartial referee and c) coach, particularly to new players or new to the GM. If the player's and GM ...


5

"...I also expect to be treated with basic civility." This is not someone who wants you to make a better game experience - this is someone who likes tearing into people. If he really wanted to help you, it would be more of a focus on things you can work on starting out (not expecting greatness fresh out the gate), it would be also pointing out what ...


8

We're not sure if you read the situation correctly either Sorry, but I don't believe this question can be effectively answered in this format. Was he really being rude, or were you being overly defensive? There's no way for us to know. We can read between the lines (cancelling your game over his concerns seems a little over-touchy, so there is a warning ...


14

Assuming you told him your thoughts... You've Already Done It And the "it" is to not play with this person anymore You've talked to them. You agree on some points and not others. It sounds like this person's play style doesn't match yours. That's fine, happens to everyone. I consider myself pretty flexible when it comes to play styles and there's still ...


1

Characters dying unevenly isn't a problem in Polaris, but players feeling steamrollered or unable to contribute to the game is definitely a problem. I realize this is probably too late for this particular game, but my advice in general is to either. Let the two not-as-confident players sit across from each other. That way, they can play conflicts at their ...


1

Next to the useful tricks / methods to advice them to learn, here is a highly uncommon approach. Don't do it. If they want to play a game, where they don't know the rules, it is not a problem. You know the rules, and it is enough - although it is a highly different game style. On its most extrem approach, you don't give them even their character sheets. ...


1

It sounds like the annoying things the player does are all in-game and characterization related rather than meta-game related. What I mean by that is that the player isn't having his character stop the other party members from doing anything or even engaging in manipulative behavior to minimize the importance/screen time of the other PCs. The player is ...


6

"We'll wait while you figure it out." It doesn't have to be your job to do all the rules for everyone and make them all custom character sheets and whatnot. You're not their boss, teacher, or mom, you're their DM. When the time comes up in game and they don't know what their HD is, tell them "look it up." Let other players help them, but there is not a ...


0

Don't. Tell them what dice to roll and ask what the result was (in human terms - "you hut him bad but he's still coming", not "You did 8hp but he's got 4 left") when you need to. The books are there to start you off; if they're not helping then either eject them or work around them, don't force them on the players. If you feel that you have to have players ...


-4

Stop playing Pathfinder, start playing Rifts. Problem = solved. :) Srsly. This groups sounds like a whacky bunch of oddballs all interested in playing their weirdos as they like and letting you the GM sort out exactly how that will work. Alignments create an issue, leveling and PC power create issues, and then the campaign setting creates issues. Rifts ...


10

Interest creates learning. Sounds like some players are playing classes they are not interested in. The paladin should be a wizard (can still be lawful good alignment if that is why they are a paladin), then casting every turn could become easier to find something useful and possibly more exciting for the player. Your cleric player would be happier as a ...


4

Eliminate the Game's Abstraction A RPG is a game where the player takes on the role of a character and makes decisions as if they were the character. In order to make things fair and balanced, the game rules impose limitations, but a character isn't aware of these limitations in mathematical terms, just like your players aren't (usually) aware of the same ...


1

In addition to getting reference materials into your players' hands, I recommend the following. Encourage Cooperation If you're the one reminding players what to do, they might start to feel like you're playing for them. From your last paragraph, it sounds like part of what you're experiencing is push-back for trying to get them to play the way you want ...


6

9 sessions in 5 month is one session every other week in average. That's an awful lot of time to forget everything they've learned over and over again. I think your problem is specific not only to RPG but to didactics in general. So in addition to the cheat sheets I'd propose a sort of "bootcamp": A weekend with at least two almost day long sessions in a row ...


17

The Critique For all of us D&D 5 is a new system; for you and your group it is a whole new concept. Some of the things that you say are basic are not so basic - I have been playing for 30+ years and I wouldn't know my attack bonus or the modifier for a Dex of 15 without looking them up on my character sheet. Have a look at the questions on this site - ...


44

1. Get a cheatsheet into each player's hands. You know that godsend player, the one who always has the notecards? Key thing there: the notecards. You've spoken to the group, and they got upset, but you know they cared enough to get the books in the first place. It's entirely possible that they do just forget, or maybe they're having a difficult time with ...


1

Some great answers here. I'd like to add that anti-authoritarians have their place, I've DMed for parties that were basically composed of nothing else and I've played one or two myself. My answer to DMing them was to run my campaigns with a "I fought the law but the law won" philosophy. Hilarious barbarian misunderstanding in a shop leading to the store ...


0

The first question you have to ask yourself is - is everyone having fun? If not, find a way to handle this, ideally with the whole group. But if they are, it might just be something interesting to work with. As part of the character background, you really need to answer a few questions: How did he manage to survive up to the point your guys got together? ...



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