New answers tagged

0

Try comparing it as different jobs and tasks You can try comparing classes and their roles as jobs in real life. You call a locksmith when your lock is broken, not a plumber or a lawyer. Of course, you could try in real life to train a wide set of usefull skils, but you probably lack the time and will to do so. As in real life, you generally prefer to focus ...


0

Problems with the character There are no problems with strong combat character builds or player's knowledge of rules. 1) Strong build: while it is possible to make laughably ineffective characters, it is hard to to make a perfect one. Even most combat effective juggernauts have some weaknesses. Let character shine for this session and then study your ...


-1

Maybe a silence spell? You could drop one on the whole party to experiment with how they communicate. Changing the parameters of communication can give other players the chance to step up and express themselves. If they player keeps taking control out of chracter then you could try and keep them in character which might make it harder for them to take ...


0

First of all I highly disrecommend you to punish them in any way. If they even stop this inappropriate behavior they may later bear you a grudge and the game will be unpleasant. Everything depends on one's personality. I would recommend following options in the exact order if the previous one do not work: The soft way Exchange a few words face to face ...


2

I DM a group of 6-7 players in an D&D 5e adventure. We had a similar problem with one player taking control of role playing events. The solution we used was a charisma based initiative system where when multiple people wanted to talk at the same time, they would roll a d20 with a social skills related modifier. This let me ignore the controlling player ...


2

There are several problems that can look the same, but need different ways to fix them. I will try to give an exhaustive list, but feel free to indicate ones I've missed in the comments. The player is seeking attention Most people like having someone who listens to them. That's natural. However it is a problem when it causes them to disregard other ...


-1

I have a player like this. How I handle it will depend on when it occurs in the game. (note, I am GMing RoleMaster but the general situations apply). If it is not a battle situation or a time sensitive one, then I just let it occur. If the player is playing a bossy character, then that's just the way it is. I still ask other players their opinions ...


-4

I agree with the answer that it should be handled in the context of the game. One approach would be to have that player's character trigger some sort of curse or spell that renders him mute. Since this is a Role-Playing game, the human behind the character must also be mute. He can still try to boss other players through signs or messages, but that ...


6

This is an out of character problem that should be dealt with in the same way. From experience, attempting to address this with in-character roleplay has a nasty habit of validating what they are doing. Speak to them again privately and make clear the following. Every person at the table has the right to the same amount of spotlight time. It is every ...


10

Before rushing off Please, before following the more hard-nosed advice in some of the other answers, speak privately with your other players, and see how much of a problem they feel the situation is. When you issue an ultimatum (threatening to kick him out) the player may just leave the game to avoid the humiliation of rejection. And you have no assurance ...


19

Have you tried non-violent communication? Try empathizing with the One Player. Find out why he's acting the way he is. Assume good intentions. Listen. Does he think the other players want or need his advice? Is he trying to teach? Does he want to achieve the best outcome of the game, even if it means playing it all himself? After listening, thank him, ...


34

Talk to the player You have done this; good - do it again. This time explain the rulesTM. You need to decide what the rulesTM are. My suggestion is that when he: "tells people what to do with their characters" you will interrupt him and ask the other player "X has said he would like you to do Y. What would you like to do?" "never lets anyone get a ...


5

You can do nothing to encourage the problem player nor should you! As a Game Master, your role is to run a game that is enjoyable for everyone, including yourself. Your role is not to coherence, cajole, manipulate, or train players into behaving how you wish they would. Yes, even if it is for their own good and makes them a better person ®. If the majority ...


7

If you already talked to him, next step is to just don't listen to him when he speaks out of turn. Ask another player what does he do, or what does he say, and if your problem player intervenes, just tell him to shut up straight and clear. Maybe in a bit more polite way depending who he is, a good friend or just an outsider. Be strict about this, ignore ...


-4

There are only two situations where it is okay to punish players for OOC chat. If one or more players are rudely interrupting another player trying to speak who has the floor. If it is becoming such a detriment as to make the game no longer fun. For the first situation, my solution is to play this video on a loop at whatever volume is necessary to drown ...


0

J. A. Streich nailed my solution but since it's buried in with several others I'm going to separate it out into it's own post: There is no such thing as out of character talk. Anything the player says that's game-related but not actions or requests for more detail (or answers provided by other players to requests for detail) is something their character ...


4

"Should I just begin killing them off and give them new character sheets if it goes too far?" Never. That's counter-productive: the role-playing you seek requires the players to be invested in their characters, and there's no way that's going to happen if you kill them off because you don't like what they did. Learned that lesson the hard way myself when ...


19

I'd like to offer a frame challenge. If I understand you correctly, you want to run a game in which there is little or no out-of-character communication. Your players have told you that they want to play in a game in which there is lots of out-of-character communication. Why are you playing in the same game together? Either you'll punish the players until ...


9

Talk to your players You want an immersive role-playing experience where out-of-character discussion is off limits. That's great ... unless your players want to treat the game as a tactical war game and couldn't give a rat's about character development. Both of these are equally valid ways of playing a role playing game. You can't make your players do ...


39

Don't make players do anything Let players use OOC talk if that's how they want to think and plan. Just don't let it devolve into too much crosstalk ('too much' itself being a sliding bar, different for every group). Remind your players OOC discussion still represents IC discussion, exactly the same way as saying "I swing my sword at the orc" represents ...


4

Address the players in Character Address the players as the NPCs who talk to them. Look them in the eye, make the statement or question, and then hold the gaze until the answer. Even if they answer in the third person, continue in character responding to what is said. It sets the tone, gives them the example and if you're acting in character they will be ...


29

Absolutely DO NOT punish your players via health and resources. Taking "tangible" things away from the player makes the players think your game is DM vs. Player, and they will continue to rebel against you. There are better ways to encourage behaviors. Let's go with a balanced Carrot and Stick approach. The Carrot You're punishing with the stick, but ...


0

Seems like you don't want them upsetting your legitimate game with their "joking around", but you also don't want to deny a man his dice, even when he shows up unannounced. If your game is combat focused, it would be "okay" to dismiss the two superfluous players because they are diluting your planned experience point distribution. What I mean is that a ...


0

I'm just gonna say it. Remove him from the group. Usually that's the last resort answer. These types of games are social ones, and social problems do arise. It's important to try to work them out. It sounds like you have tried though. From what you have said, he's fine as long as he gets his way. It's when he doesn't get his way that these negative things ...


3

I think that in writing out the question, you've already taken us halfway to the answer. Let's rearrange the info you gave us in roughly chronological order: He's an experienced player, and usually plays in games that don't really challenge him or his characters. In those games, he's fine and doesn't argue with the GM. You, as his little brother, invite ...


2

Looks like your brother might be a munchkin. I don't want to be pessimistic, but if it is true, then you have a great problem which unfortunately may be never solved. Goddamn it! You are the Game Master! You must point him out that you are the Game Master of campaign, not him. You are the one creator of this world. He is just a player and should act like ...


8

Pre-warning - I have little experience as a DM dealing with difficult players, but I'm getting pretty used to dealing with difficult tables in general. A couple of things we found really handy for our horde of uncooperative players: Talk it out / Remind him You said in the comments that: I have talked to him about it before. He seems understanding ...


1

I wanted to provide an alternative answer to just kicking them out. What you have, is two groups of people who apparently want different things from roleplaying. In the blue corner, you have your "serious" RP'ers who turn up pretty much every week, and want to be serious about the Roleplaying. In the Red corner, you have a few people who enjoy playing with ...


0

It always helps to talk to the person first to let them know their behaviour is disruptive and have an honest dialogue. If things don't improve, let them know you'll have no choice but to remove them from the game.


2

6+ player groups can be rough. It's a lot harder to rein people in when there are a lot of them. I don't think this is the root of your issue, but it's something you might want to look into as well. Can they get the recap of the story out of game? It might be useful to do the recap out of game if you have the option to. I don't know what your relationship ...


3

It's "ok" at any time. Ideally however you would start with setting expectations - perhaps they will buckle down and come regularly if you say that's an expectation of your game (which is fair). Just booting them without setting that expectation is pretty much by definition unfair however, as there are different kinds of gamers who expect different things ...


0

After a careful analysis of the PHB and DMG, I have found the following bits of information, which I believe can be considered together to arrive at a reasonable conclusion. PHB 181, "Travel Pace": While traveling, a group of adventurers can move at a normal, fast, or slow pace[...] A fast pace makes characters less perceptive, while a slow pace makes ...


4

I've dealt with this a few times, both in my live group and in my online game, both with groups of more or less random people who met through a service to play, and with friends from school/work/life. I have handled it well, and I have handled it incredibly poorly. You learn a lot from those mistakes, but it can hurt. There are a lot of variables you ...


11

Other answers have covered that the thing to do that's less drastic than immediately kicking them out is setting expectations (it's a bit late, and yet never too late) and then holding everyone to them (make sure you are holding everyone to the same standard). That way if you have to ask them to leave, it's not just your decision - you outlined what would ...


6

At what time would it be "ok" for me to ask these disruptive players to step down from the group? Well, the simplest answer is, "Whenever you've decided you've had enough." The longer and probably more accurate answer is, "Whenever you've had enough and have enough support from the rest of the players that you won't shatter the group by dis-inviting them." ...


19

Tell them what the problem is, give suggestions on how to fix it, define a set of rules, and if they don't follow kick them out. First, set expectations. Good gaming practice is to have a session zero that goes over not just house rules, tone, theme, character building, but also table rules, like 'no cellphones' or 'keep chatter to a min'. It's too late to ...


0

I am this guy. I play D&D 3.5 but I expect the experience to be generic. I know some players who just pick an off-the-shelf character and roll with it; deciding on their options as they go. Essentially, they see the mechanics of character creation as a chore and prefer to move on to actual play. It's fine by me, I like playing with them... ... but I ...


5

As a newbie DM, you're well within your rights to restrict players to official races and classes. But it might be useful to have a chat with your player and find out why he's going for homebrew races/classes, first. It's likely to be one of two reasons: He wants to powergame (ie, he's doing it for the stats) He wants his character to be unique and ...


20

Your world, your rules Ultimately, when it comes down to it, the DM is the one deciding which home-brew rules, if any, the group is going to use. The DM always has final say. So if you feel that you cannot properly handle his home-brew classes, you need to tell him so. Especially if you are new at this. Tell him he can't do it. Which brings me to my next ...


3

I have someone like this in my group. He must always play something outside of the rules, and refuses to play a majority of the regular races and classes. Now, I have found that putting him through danger or discriminating against him usually ended with him winning and thinking he is unstoppable. So, I have found 2 options that work. Deny his homebrew ...


5

If the game really is switching from a role-playing game to a ship-to-ship combat game for long stretches, there's no surprise the diplomat feels useless. Some folks reviewing sci-fi shows will talk about "highlighter battles" - scenes in the show where all the action is phasers, lasers, or blasters. They can be boring for a lot of viewers. Add drama to ...


1

It's impossible to tell without being there. But it sounds like you are already doing a good job of including non-combat play. How useful are the other two PCs during the "Jeff parts" ? If it's more a problem of patience and perception, then in the long run it might be easier to adjust Jeff's character so he looks more like the other two PCs and is useful ...


0

Another option is to make bad rolls trigger traps (even traps you hadn't necessarily planned for those spots). If currently there's only upside to constant checking why wouldn't your players do it? After a few times their <10 rolls trigger spikes or poison gas or whatever they might be a bit more judicious with their checking and only do it when the ...


5

There are really two problems here: the player/character isn't suitable for some scenes, and some scenes aren't well-suited to one of your PC's. You need to meet in the middle. (I think all sci-fi RPGs, and stories generally, have to deal with this problem to an extent; I'll be basing my answer on experience GMing a homebrew GURPS Star Wars game and playing ...


9

I just played a game in a similar situation. We were running a Stargate-themed game and I was the team doctor. We spent three to four game sessions in non-stop combat situations where our four soldiers shined and discovered of a "magic" healing device along with an NPC who could use said healing device and usurp my character's entire reason for being there, ...


1

[Disclaimer I come from shadowrun] Imagine a character built on sneaking around, stabbing people and stealing stuff, how would you handle situations when this character is caught sneaking? An alarm being flagged or combat starting, forcing a 'fight or flight' situation. These actions can be really fun, even if the stealth character is really bad at them ...


3

Use Passive Perception AND Active Perception. Your players seem to want to make sure you aren't being unfair, which means they don't trust you. If you're not going to solve this problem, you can remove the need to trust you. As many have noted, passive perception is designed for this type of thing. Your players don't seem to think so. What you should do is ...


3

I've been in that situation many times, most of them on the players' side, the situation where in each corner the players would claim again they're scanning ground, walls and ceiling for danger and secrets. I've come to learn that usually comes from the DM's style, not the players'. If this happens so often that it irritates you, you should ask yourself two ...


0

As others have pointed out there is a direct automatic option with the passive values. Aside from real automatics some players WANT to roll the dices as they can get higher than the passive values. If that is also the case in this case there is a second option out there: Let them make their stealth rolls and then their perception rolls as normal. But ...


5

Make time matter A Master sometimes needs to adapt to players. If you players want to be sure of every step they make, enforce it comes with a price: half an hour searching, walking slower (and taking twice the time I'd would if you'd walk at normal speed), and so on. And make time matter. For making time matter you need to ensure players know that taking ...



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