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3

This is a social contract problem and one of the easy things to do is figure out if this is a miscommunication problem or "this guy is being a jerk" problem. This is actually really easy to determine, quickly. Consider if you think something works a certain way, you argue for it, but then look it up and find out you're wrong. "Oh, man, I'm sorry, I really ...


-10

Allow him to continue this behaviour but inform him he must "consult the bitter oracle". If he pisses her off by presenting invalid interpretations she ports him to the starting town and to find his party again he must role 5x d6 to achieve a number below the number of turns he has been attempting to rejoin his party.


6

I'd deal with it differently according to two separate cases. Either way, first you need to get the the player to acknowledge that he keeps being proved wrong by the lookup, and he doesn't know his spells as well as he'd like, and the lookups are disruptive and undesirable. It might be that this is how he thinks the game should be played. It might be this ...


24

I think a lot of the answers in How do you help players not focus on the rules? are on point here as well. They talk about limiting time spend discussing and taking things offline, but perhaps the most important is establishing that your rulings stand and that as a more experienced player, and additionally as the GM, your interpretations of the rules are the ...


3

Keep a computer open with a searchable version of the rules available for anyone to use. There should be a quick way to look up rules since not everyone has memorized the entirety of every rule book and even the most avid gamer is going to need to check on a rarely used spell for an unusual situation. The SRD for 3.5, the PRD for Pathfinder are obvious ...


16

Place a firm but fair and transparent limit on the amount of time that is allowed to be spent discussing rules issues. I keep a few cheap plastic hourglass timers handy during gaming sessions to fairly and transparently give out time for out-of-character interactions. This includes letting the party decide group tactics, adjudicating rules issues, or ...



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