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1

Trying to get players to do something they don't want to isn't gaming. The primary purpose of gaming is to have fun. The other answers cover this pretty well already, however, so the main reason I interject is to suggest that the question you are asking is the wrong question. I am a reluctant GM, who is GM-ing because no one else wanted the job. The ...


3

We had a situation like this in a previous game (where I was not the DM) with one particular player, and the DM was really pushing it. Afterwards, he mentioned to me not liking to fill in that stuff because he wants to see how the character develops in play, at the table. It wasn't that he wasn't into the game — he felt like the homework was adding extra ...


1

I think you need to take a step back and examine the game as a whole. Often, when one character is "too clever" in turning situations to his or her advantage, the actual problem is that the game is pandering to that character, giving them just the right tools to solve problems. Instead, take a step back and try to figure out some situations that would really ...


14

You Don't The problem here is the premise. This isn't school or work. You can't force people to do homework if they don't want to, at least not without creating bad feelings at the table. The single most important rule of gaming is to have fun. Are they having fun when you try to force them to do these things? I don't feel that most of what I'm asking ...


2

I'm not familiar with the system you're using or the game you're running, but traditionally I've used small bribes to encourage players to do stuff like this. If you come up with a detailed background that I can work into the setting I'll give you xp for it. Note that I got hit on the head and have amnesia is not a detailed background, neither is I'm an ...


1

It turned out that much of my problem actually lay in something that was not covered by the other answers here, and that is the timing of the character's solutions; not only were they highly effective (and sometimes clever in an engineering sense, albeit not a diplomatic one), they came far too soon, keeping problems from turning into plot drivers. I've ...


2

One part of your problem seems to be that you invest far more energy and resources into the game than the other players. People in your position usually become the GM of the group ;-) So you could switch to a narrative RPG with GM (for example the free system "Wushu") or you could use your narrative powers to handicap your character. You know what she can ...


-1

Ohhh! It's your character? So essentially, you're the problem. People play RPGs to have fun. By your own admission, you're detrimentally affecting the fun of the other players and are concerned about it. My advice? Stop being the problem.


14

You understand the negative effects that your play is having, but keep doing it. Why? I'm guessing it's because you have a strong sense of "but the character would do this." You need to go read What is "my guy syndrome"?, which is going to tell you to go read Making the Tough Decisions. "It's what my character would do" is never an excuse for ...


12

Well, someone's going to kill her some day instead of just imprisoning her or cutting parts of her anatomy off. Probably one of the other PCs. But there's no real problem other than that you, the player, are bullying the other players into indulging your ego-trip; it's not clear how but I can make some guesses based on the lack of a GM and many ...


6

I think you've got part of the solution at hand: She also has social interaction traits that could be seen as either sociopathic or autistic, but those are not the primary focus of this problem. Let me put forward the idea that these traits are, if not the source of the problem, at least contributing to it. You have a character who is exceedingly ...


2

welcome to the site! As it turns out there is actually a very simple method of handling characters like this: Don't play the character as especially clever That's it. That's all. I'm done. ... ... ... Oh wait, you're probably going to throw out the "but that's how my character would act" argument. Yea, I hear that one a lot. And you know what? It's not ...


-3

My usual answer to rules lawyering is to remind that player that the DM is basically like god in D&D and everyone knows that if you bother a god enough he'll make a rock fall on you doing 200d6 roll-a-new-character damage. That usually makes the character shut up about it for a while. If not the DM makes us do spot checks anytime we walk near a mountain ...


2

I think there are some good generic answers here, so I'm not going to cover that. What I am going to cover is Lady Blackbird. Lady Blackbird is specifically built around the idea of the players and GM developing the world as the story progresses. In fact, I've never had more fun with Lady Blackbird then when the exchanges go like... Player 1: What kind ...


-7

Players really, REALLY like to try and tell you how they know fictional things behave and act, especially if they are not in control of the game world. It's very tempting to try and bring real logic into a roleplaying game, and in moderation it can be done successfully. However. As the gamesmaster you have to make sure your players know that they cannot ...


-1

I'm going to leave the specifics out, since the issue is not really the particular case. The real answer is that you can't always avoid such clashes. Sometimes a player has a very specific idea of what's going on in their head and it simply doesn't match yours. All you can do is try to establish up front that while the game's running you expect the players ...


-5

How old is this player because it sounds as if they're only like 5 years old. In any case, I'm not familiar with Lady Blackbird rules but would I be correct in assuming spells and such have specified damage? If so then there's you're answer. You could maybe add and/or subtract something too. If it's a single target spell, turn it into a burst/blast. Reduce ...


10

First of all, this is a game. Games use abstractions and abstractions are made to avoid delving into considering every single aspect of the situation every time something happens. Even in a D&D game, when someone shots an arrow, nobody tries to consider the shape of the armor, where exactly the projectile hit it or similar things. You just compare your ...


25

Quiet clearly, this answer is not a system specific one. However, I believe it could be applied to a wide set of games. As a GM, it is your job to make sure that the character understand the consequences of their character's actions. Because most of the time, the characters would know the effect the player describe is not what would happen. So, say a ...



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