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-3

I fail to see the problem. The world (even a fantasy one) is not a False Dichotomy between good and bad "sides"- there is a whole range in between and that is without adding in the Blue and Orange axis. The Mafia, the Yakuza, ISIS, Al Qaeda, outlaw motorcycle gangs, self-employed meth cooks and corrupt cops are all antithetical to the good order of society ...


2

Another option is to make this the big twist of the campaign. The heroes go through with poisoning, get to the treasure chamber. Once at the doors, they find all the gaurds all ready dead. A note is attached to the door. "We've been watching you. Thank you for destabilising the city. It advances our plans too. Take the removal of these guards as a thank you ...


0

Riffing on Dan B's answer; If this player is bored by party splitting or solo scenes they're not in, there's some ways you can address that. When I have a party split or a solo scene, I usually flip back and forth between the multiple split groups. "Meanwhile, over here...". If done with the right pacing it lets people have a little time to think of their ...


1

I don't worry about character alignment. In many cases it doesn't matter, either the world punishes the bad (e.g. they are arrested, killed etc by the authorities or those that oppose them, or if you're in the mood to share the pain, if they do destabilise the city kill their loved ones in the turmoil :)) and rewards the good. As you may have noticed the ...


-6

If he refuses to put his phone down until it's his turn, I can tell you that it isn't because he's bored. He is just more interested in his phone than in the game. Like OCD he is addicted to his phone. I don't know if anyone else asked this question, but does he always have his nose in his phone ? Like when he's at home, eating dinner, out with friends, ...


-7

Beside talking to him and talking to the rest of the group, to which the others have allready written more than enough, there is another option. You could buy a Mobile Connection Jammer. You only want to jam "one room", so one for < 100€ probably is going to be enough. BUT CHECK YOUR LOCAL LAWS BEFORE BUYING ONE. Also if you are the host of the game and ...


11

This is not based on my own experience, but that of a podcaster I listen to. His advice in this situation is to say nothing about using a cell phone at the table, simply stop interacting with them while they are nose-first in Facebook. If they decide to interact with the party or the NPCs, respond as though nothing happened. The theory behind this being ...


1

This might be a controversial answer, but if done correctly, it might actually improve the game. Involve the phone in the game These days, nearly everyone has a smartphone (and everyone except some elderly at least has a dumbphone), and services and apps exist to send messages at a predetermined time (or the GM can just prepare in advance and press when ...


-2

He may just be immature. I remember that when I was a young teenager and played my father at chess while others were watching TV in the same room, I would ostentatiously watch the TV between turns. This was my way of proving that I was so clever that I could do several things at once. Of course I realize now that it was very rude. At the time I was much more ...


58

The first thing you need to do is talk to the player again. Explain, in neutral and non-accusatory terms, why his use of the phone is frustrating to you as the GM. Have examples ready, in case he says it's not affecting anyone - for example, "When your turn comes up, I have to spend time reminding you of what's going on, even though everyone else already ...


21

I did this in a campaign a year ago. :( What I can say is that the game was -- I don't want to say boring, exactly, but we spent an awful lot of time splitting the party and doing solo scenes where one player was talking to the DM and everyone else just wasn't present. I would have two or three hours in a row of straight-up downtime because my character ...


17

Talk to the rest of your group. You've made it clear that you've spoken to him about this, that it bothers you and that it slows down the game. Does the rest of the group feel this way too? If not, you may be the odd one out here. In that case, you might have to bite the bullet and enjoy the game as it is if he isn't willing to put the phone down. If the ...


81

You're not going to like it, but I would let him walk. Having a player on his phone breaks immersion for everyone else, and he's said outright that he'd rather leave than put down the phone. Tell him that you don't want to sour the friendship, but that you're not ok running a campaign where people have phones out at the table. And then offer to hang out ...


1

While the DM certainly has a role in keeping the sessions interesting and fun for everyone, it's also important to remember that in any game, it's just a group of people playing together. Have you considered just having a conversation directly with the extrovert in question? It would be best to frame your conversation about your experience, instead of ...


9

Talk to your DM about it From the sounds of things, especially the extra information in the comment to the other answer, you have enjoyed playing with everyone but the extroverted player, and the extroverted player is new to the group. It sounds like the extrovert is not a good fit for your group. From a GM perspective, the best way to handle this is to ...


5

As i see t there a two challenges here: One is you are all introverts, he is extrovert. This is a difficult constellation. Your group should play a few weeks without him, so you all can work your shyness. Your "friend" "who yells at" and "dismisses and shushes" you, sounds like a spoiled brat, maybe you should rethink what friendship means. Friends ...


1

If your setting is a "living world" how would the villagers themselves solve it? They would probably hire an other group of better than good adventurers to fight the PCs. Introduce this other group that is trying to hunt them down and let them show they are "Über good".


33

It sounds like they're having trouble because they can't figure out where the plot is. Their actions make it clear they would like to fight chaos, but in the absence of chaos to fight, they're filling time by lining their own pockets. You've already made some progress toward the solution by giving them criminal organizations to destroy. It sounds like they ...


2

I as a GM handle rules rather loose as well, and would probably have reacted somewhat similar like you. But over time I had some players that had similar "problems" and talked with a lot of other GMs about their groups that had similar "problems" and with that I'd recommend you to the following: Think about the situation objectively and try to value what ...


8

There are two kinds of rules lawyers, and the way you treat each depends on where they sit between "I know the rules and want to help" and "I know the rules and will use them to break the game in my favor". The first type is the helpful one. They usually know the rules from heart, or at least know where they should look for an obscure rule. They are not ...


2

I am at a loss, does anyone have any experiences with players like him? Yes, I have had that kind of experience. Most people who DM eventually run into one. What's the best way to handle it? That depends on you and your circle of friends / gamers. Interpersonal relationships are complex and dynamic. A leisure activity leading to friction can harm ...


5

There's a difference between someone acting in good faith vs. bad faith when it comes to rules lawyering - and the sign is how they react when the same rules are used against their character. The good faith player goes, "Oh yep, you got me! Damn!" and keeps having fun. The bad faith player then argues the rules don't apply or pouts and is angry. In other ...


21

My suggestions, coming from the other side of the fence where I (and some of the other players) feel that the DM plays a little too fast and loose with the rules, and makes changes to things that we think ought to be "canon" for the well-known world we are playing in: 1) Be willing to consider that the player may be right. Allow him to make a brief ...


14

So I too had a player and friend who was exactly like this in my games. The tactic I used to eliminate this problem was rather simple: All rulings are DM rulings, and arguments that grind the game to a halt are relegated to after the game. If he persists in pressing an argument after you say, "Discuss this after the game," then just turn to the other ...



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