New answers tagged

1

I basically agree with other answers, I will suggest other approaches: Stop playing pathfinder Most of your problems (2 and 3) seems to come from the complexity of the rules, either because the DM don't know them well enough to keep the pace interesting or because players always have things to check. Pathfinder's rules are among the most complex ones I ...


0

All the answers so far are exceptionally detailed, but I think the general takeaway is more important - you effectively have two choices: Speak with the player and explain why letting monsters eat you is a good thing for fun (realism and the fact interesting stories rarely occur when everything goes right). Shoot the player in the kneecap with an arrow (...


0

All three parts of the question are really just parts of the same problem. There are several things to do. First: Read Ben's answer. (I'll admit I borrow a lot from it.) Discuss all of those things with the group. Introduce the subject. "Guys and girls, before we start tonight, I think we need to take a few minutes to discuss how we can all work ...


1

Honestly if I had magic powers without limit I'd be using them all the time. Perhaps he's wasting game-time and breaking the immersion so just tell him that you assume he's always casting and will let him know of any evil when he enters the room. This isn't really ruining the game, it's how it should be played. Just like a thief should check for traps ...


4

Talk to the group. With issues involving group dynamics; people not listening, doing their own thing, disregarding others etc., this is usually best handled by discussing the issue with the group. You mentioned you tried the "talking stick" - which is a good idea; but you have to enforce it. Some ways to do this might be: Get a physical object to hold. ...


0

Ages ago I read interesting article about this issue. Author suggest that, casting those spells and it's effects will be noticeable for most people around caster. And some low born folks might have some prejudice against spell casters. Hence, player instead being conned by greedy shopkeeper, will end up in prison accused for witchery. By addition, If you ...


-2

In Piers Anthony's Blue Adept, the protagonist became casual about spellcasting until he tried to use magic in a room full of amulets that were triggered by magic. Even one such amulet that releases (for example) a demon when a spell is cast onto it would wreck your character's day (in-world, at least; in-game it could be amusing for everyone involved).


-4

Require specific motions (eg peering closely with fingers parted over eye) as a requirement of the spell, and a moderately long delay (eg 3 minutes) which would be awkward to do continually..... Then make a social stigma of people who continually do so as it would be both social awkward, and extreme personal insult to strangers, and a social faux pas to ...


0

To add to the accepted and other answers I'll append the following: You are able to give insights into an encounter without spoiling any secrets. In the example given, when you described the boss, did you make mention that his armor looks different than those around him or that your players have seen before? [This only works with magic items that 'look' ...


2

Take advantage of the inherent limitations in the spell. Other answers have already touched on the casting time, so I'll skip that one, but there are a few others to exploit. Non-detection of low-level evil An evil creature of 4 or fewer HD does not give off an evil aura, unless it's an Outsider or Undead, or is a Cleric or Paladin of an evil deity. So you ...


7

Gaming for Optimization The motivation behind casting a free spell a lot is that you get the benefit with little cost. This thinking appeals to the type of player who enjoys optimizing for maximum "advantage": anything from gold to xp to anything that is a stand-in for "winning" in an rpg. It is important to understand this about the player. It is also ...


5

To draw an analogy, I'm short-sighted and I wear glasses. All the time. I don't just put them on when there's something I want to look at. I wouldn't appreciate someone telling me "look here, this ability you have of seeing things at a distance is rather disruptive, wouldn't you mind using it only when you absolutely have to?". And, if I was a character in a ...


3

Everybody already mentioned the fact these spells are not instant to cast and some people can take that badly. I agree with them but will try to suggest some other solutions. First, you can by GM fiat simply decide that these abilities are not at-will anymore. Make a houserule which says "lvl 0 spell slots are limited to 40 uses a day", it won't break the ...


1

Instead of making the whole world start to turn against him and his spells, have you considered just asking the player to try and cast Detect spells only when he suspects something? "Hey, I'd like to suprise you guys or have things be a bit mysterious, and you're making it hard with those spells, could you tone them down a bit to give me the leeway to make ...


56

Make the campaign manage this At low levels the basic method of detecting magic is through the use of the spell detect magic. At low levels the basic method of determining whether a creature's evil is the paladin's spell-like ability detect evil. The spell detect magic has verbal and somatic components and, when it's cast, provokes attacks of opportunity. ...


140

Considering there is a casting time and a bunch of cues that he's doing this, how is the world reacting to his constant spellcasting? It seems that the real solution is there. Do his fellow players stop to wait for his results? When entering a room, in the time it takes for him to cast Detect Magic and Detect Evil, the other players will most likely have ...


14

The root of this issue is framing, and a disconnect between your players assumption of the world and the world you want to run. If your group is aiming for any sort of immersiveness and not just a hack and slash dungeon crawl, your player is not playing "smart" at all. The first thing I would suggest you do, is sit down and make sure you're on the same page ...


1

It seems to me that your player came with some, let's say non-standard character for you that may be certainly valid if you fill in some blanks. Let's break that PC down on elements and find out if his backstory fits. Has the soldier background and is a fighter Your PC was a soldier that quite reasonably knew how to wield a sword or other weapon at ...


2

It sounds like he's trying to be a bit of everything - farmer, soldier, charismatic historian... I'd suggest he simplify it to just one concept, aside from his class. The idea of Backgrounds is that they reflect your backstory: Backgrounds Every story has a beginning. Your character’s background reveals where you came from, how you became an ...


1

I would suggest a character arc where this character rises to general, and is then granted a fiefdom to run. He has the perfect mix of skills: military, intellectual, agricultural.


2

I like the idea of a character using detect magic all the time. He or she walks in a world that the mundanes don't even know exists. Detect evil, on the other hand, isn't as useful as the player might think. So, the character detects the captain of the guard as evil. No what? If they attack the captain, the rest of the guard attack and either capture or ...


4

It used to be so that detect magic would give off a visual signal such as blue glowing eyes, and I assume the others like detect evil would have had a similar tell. For the detect magic there are are a few things you could do. Have the items hidden within an extra-dimensional area such as a bag of holding. Be under the effect of the spell which hides ...


1

A logical way to deal with this is simply to arrange things so that scouting ahead really does mean scouting ahead by reducing the opportunities for easy XP and making it more dangerous to be anything other than very cautious. For example perhaps that tempting lone sentry is really bait for an ambush or the enemy realises that there are scouts out and has ...


5

The fundamental spirit behind the "My Guy Syndrome" discussion is this: Roleplaying is a hobby, so the underlying goal is for all of us to enjoy ourselves. Roleplaying games flow best when we can be honest about our desires and intentions, both with our friends and our own selves. Those principles still apply here. I think one reason1 that you're not ...


2

You've noted you're a new DM. The first thing I would check for is to make sure you and this player are both using the rules correctly. If he's saying stealth works in a certain way, make sure he's reading the entire rule and that you are too. A second consideration is how you're playing your monsters. I've been the dude out scouting, when I find the lone ...


2

Change his alignment If he acts chaotic, present him as such. Toss the attention that chaotic characters earn at him. If he insists he is lawful, have the guards tell him to tell it to the judge. More importantly, do not get caught up in his character sheet, but rather design games based around how you know he is going to play. Don't let what is on paper ...


3

Our working model to give experience is based on two main sources of experience points: story milestones (whole group) interpretation (single player) You kill all the dogs, kobolds, bandits you find on the road? fine, 0xp. You do it alone? 0xp. You kill the dragon? 0xp anyway. You save the princess? 3.500xp to each player. You ...


4

The two most obvious ways to describe this type of behaviour (to me) are Reverse MyGuy Syndrome, where the actions are not what MyGuy would do, as written on the sheet, or simply Poor Roleplaying where a character's listed traits are ignored in order to profit from the situation at-hand. Anyway... Firstly: Is it actually a problem? From your description ...


1

From my gaming days... Let your creativity move you away from a stock module. 1) Let the enthusiastic player help you. Can they design monsters, backstory, aspects of the world. Can they own part of the experience. 1) Use a story for inspiration. Diversify your sources. 2) Have the players help you create aspects of the world. In our case, we founded ...


8

If your objection is that a character that acts chaotic has "lawful" written on his character sheet, then depending on the version of D&D you can either ignore it completely since it has no game effect, or you can kick in some rules for alignment change. "My Guy" is when the behaviour damages the game, not when the behaviour conflicts with stated ...


2

It sounds like the player isn't 'clicking' with the harsher system. I had a similar thing happen with one of my players when we moved from D&D to Only War (a Warhammer 40K based d100 system where you're often rubbish at everything). He failed a lot and would sulk as a result. We explained to him that this is how the game works and he decided he didn't ...


13

As I read the question, there's two possibilities. Possibility One The first possibility is that your player really does think this is what his character (as he envisions it) would do. If so, the term for this is "My Guy Syndrome." Yes, really: He's doing stuff that's detrimental to the fun of the table as a whole, justifying it as staying in-character and ...


-2

So your player can scout ahead and take down a band of enemies meant for the whole party? Is he/she that strong? If the player charges into a group of enemies designed to challenge the whole party on their own, they'll probably be killed!


3

My question is, is there a name to this kind of player? "Poor sport". That's the expression I'd use when confronting such a player at my table, at least if I really had the ammunition to demonstrate that I perceive him to be dishonest. I'm not saying you should do this, because you know more about the situation than I do, but, as presented, this sure ...


29

It seems there are three distinct parts to this question. The player isn't following his character sheet RPGs are games. Games are played for fun. Something about the character as written on the sheet isn't fun for your player. He is thus ignoring the sheet and doing what he considers fun. Here are some options. Talk to him about playing a role. Modify ...


1

The way I did it was to create a Facebook Group that recaps the week's session. That way, it is a discussion about what everyone thinks about what happened and what will happen. Like you, I had a player who would try to extract extra information. I told him, after trying to gently encourage him, to post it on the group page. After he started posting there, ...


1

I use two methods to keep players interested (but not disruptive) and prevent metagaming. First, I absolutely talk to my friends about what is going on in the campaign and what I have planned. I will even use it as an opportunity to help build their character backgrounds by involving them in things they would know (e.g. one character is a soldier, so I let ...


1

Metagaming isn't inherently bad. My recommendation is to talk with this player about what their goal is with gaining the extra information. When this player does get extra information, what do they do with it? If they use the information to put their character into interesting situations, make the plot more fun for the other players and in general advance ...


2

I like to keep an air of mystery about the adventure, so the fact that he keeps reading the GM section of the rulebook (which contains monsters and gods, and all their rules and stats) and pointing out things like "oh, finally I know what that encounter was!" bothers me. The idea that published setting content is a secret is very old-school. There's ...


8

Play the encounters as if they were balanced for a party. A single character should then logically be handed their backside on a plate and either retreat or die. If you are designing encounters in such a way that a single clever player can defeat them then IMO the PC is entitled to the XP and the problem is that the DM is failing to produce a challenging ...


3

I may not be of much help here as I do all my session's on the fly, and it sounds like you are big into planning. But I have had people like this in the past, and I agree with a lot of what Sardathrion said about incorporating their ideas in ways they might not be thinking about. To me it sounds like this player is invested in the game, but not nessisarily ...


8

With my long-standing group, we've got an "in-joke" to handle situations like this. When a player starts asking too many questions (or questions that are too pointed, or I just want to change the subject), I'll simply answer with "fnord." (This can be written or verbal, depending on whether we're chatting or e-mailing.) Although it's not the real ...


5

Different Players enjoy different styles It seems you try to decide what is more fun for your player. If he is an experienced grown up player, you don't have to decide what is good and bad for him. I know a girl who reads a lot of books, but always reads the last pages first so she knows how it ends. I think spoiling herself this way is crazy, but she ...


1

I'm not entirely sure about how you run things at your table. I think you need to understand there is a MAJOR difference between what a player character (eventually) can do, and what all other creatures in your world (that you control) can do. Basic Assumptions Rules about everything a player character can do should always be available to the player. He ...


10

First of all, player communication is vital. If your player feels ignored, he will only start to pester more, especially the eager typew you have there. However, there is information players should not gain, and some of the questions you told are that case. Let's go through those examples you gave: So, what god will I be able to meet soon? Can I ...


48

So, your problem is that you have an enthusiastic player... This is a good problem to have. First and foremost: talk to your player in a candid and friendly manner about your concerns and stress that you want to find a solution where the both of you are happy. This is just normal social interactions and not really within the scope of this site. Having said ...


3

A lot of answers involve beating the guy over the head with rules. What about just dropping a note to a particularly paranoid or Good character. Have them notice his exit, and cause him to wonder enough to follow on his own accord. Perhaps the new wealth gets noticed? Is there no other greedy character, to exploit?!! ;)


2

One option I haven't seen stated in the previous answers might or might not work for your particular case, but I have found that it can change the perception of a rules-lawyer "munchkin" player a great deal. In some of my games, I have found that the psychological paradigm set up by the DM being the adversary brings out this kind of conflict. (You have to ...


22

I know you asked specifically about in-game methods, but in-game methods for altering player behavior are notoriously unreliable. If you punish the character for scouting ahead, the player is less likely to realize why everything is suddenly so hard, and more likely to assume you're just a mean DM. This sounds like a problem that needs to be talked out out-...


3

Don't give individual XP awards. Therefore, the party is all in it together. Also, it's easier to compute the XP at the end in one batch without individual break-outs. That's the obvious answer. Another response which was traditional in play, but today might be considered radical, is to implement the classic caller/leader role. That is: Assume by default ...



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