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0

You can try to solve it IG, but I wouldn't bet on it to work: Everytime he wants a NPC to react differently to what you described, you tell him, that the NPC is trying to do exactly what you said and that he is to describe the reaction of his PC. If he still argues, tell him, you'll interpret what he's saying next as an IG comment or action of his PC. At ...


0

I will try to get into the game mechanics a little bit more than the other answers, showing you what those values really mean in D&D 4e. We need something to compare these values to so I'll use a small subset of the possible point-buy arrays, the ones that grant us the best tactical advantage: The unbalanced array, 18 14 11 10 10 8, very useful for ...


0

In this instance the character is not overpowered in the least. He just took a reasonable gamble and it paid off. The other players on the other hand are kinda underpowered but that can be fixed with either a re-roll of one random key stat. You might be thinking using point buy might fix this problem but really it won't. One of the main reasons I don't use ...


3

I am this kind of player. I know it all too well, and more than once my GMs have talked to me about it. In my case, I "grew up" with DnD power-gamers, the types of players who dedicate themselves to creating the most powerful character possible within the rules, often bending said rules all the way to the breaking point. As a result, that's how I know how ...


2

I would recommend figuring out what he wants from the game, instead of trying to make him play the game your way. Maybe he isn't interested in having plots revolving around him, or in building up a narrative around his character. Perhaps he enjoys being the guest hero of the week. In that case, plan around him changing characters. Let him know where the ...


8

When I've engaged in this, it's usually because I've made a series of NPCs. When not thinking, I tend to form character requirements for maximum conflict-safety. (Not to say invulnerability within the mechanics of combat, but boring characters who don't want anything and thus have no reason for drama or narrative engagement.) Thus, because they are boring, ...


0

Player Satisfaction Generally character remodeling is a symptom of either dissatisfaction or boredom, both of which indicate the player is not receiving what they wish to receive from the game. Talk to them about their expectations, and also look at your own GMing skills, especially in things like spotlight time and player agency. If necessary, do a quick ...


3

Inevitably the best solution in these situations is Talk It Out If you've been experience a common problem at your tables but haven't been actually asked the players what's up (as alluded to when you say "I'm guessing"), you're failing in one of the primary duties of the GM; which is to make sure everyone is having fun. Now, it might be that this player is ...


8

I can understand switching to a different character once, like, you didn't understand the system or the campaign, and you didn't realize what kind of character would be a good fit for you. But repeatedly doing it, after just a few sessions? It's time to sit down with the player and have a hard talk. "What do you want from this game? Here is what ...


0

So, one of my PCs is a Lawful Neutral Knight, coming from a small landless noble family. From the beginning of the campaign he told me that he wanted a lord to serve under, and to enhance the prestige of his family. However, later on, he directly told me OOC that he was more or less a greedy bastard who cared only for power. What he tells you ...


2

"Here's the problem. You portrayed to me that you want to play a character who is honorable and tied by oaths to various things. I've been trying to include that into the game and make interesting things for you based on that. What you really wanted was a game where your character is a Machiavellian power player, and that, too, could be fun ...


-3

The player can do that. The specific technical term for it is Cheating. The DM has to keep track of the entire world, and what all the different NPCs are doing. The DM is supposed to be keeping track of sense motive checks, will saves, detect magic, zone of truth, etc. Was the dias upon which he made those oaths enchanted with a Zone of Truth spell under ...


26

I'm going to take a slight detour and address two sub-parts of your question before providing an answer, in order to provide some perspective the other answers may be lacking. Lying isn't the same as bluffing. Characters use the Bluff skill to make what’s false seem true, what’s outrageous seem plausible, and what’s suspicious seem ordinary. A character ...


2

I wonder, did the player change his mind or was he lying about motives from the beginning? It's legitimate for him to change is mind, but the latter is disrespectful to the group. Has he acted on selfish beliefs yet? If so, then you need to stop and have a conversation with the player about this inconsistency—does he prefer that his character changed his ...


15

No, it's not a legitimate thing to do because The Player Put the DM in a Difficult Spot The lies the character's told--and you're certain now that they were lies1--should have been Bluff skill checks. Make those checks. Now. By yourself. Roll for the player despite his absence. Such rolling lets you determine which folks believed the character, which ...


19

Can they? Yes. These are their own characters, after all. Nothing in the rules requires them to lay their full minds open to the DM. If it did, that would cause problems when a player decides that the PC needs to have a change of heart, for good or for ill. Is it a good idea? Usually not. A DM who knows the PCs' true motivations can work them into the ...


5

I don't think this player actually made a mistake, unless you consider it a "mistake" that she didn't play out the encounter exactly as you expected she would (and I don't). Sure, gaining the aid of a powerful NPC would have been a boon to the party, but unless you've already statted out all future challenges with the assumption that said NPC would be with ...


6

There are two considerations here: revealing information out of game and the possibility of your players feeling lectured. Both are very different problems, better addressed separately. Revealing information out of game Actually, I don't have too much to say here. You, as the GM, the one that knows better the story, are responsible to know what information ...


7

I'm inclined to ask: Is it really a mistake? I think the answer depends on the game, if you are trying to run a game about the being characters, a game about their stories, a game about resolving (or even just experiencing a plot, or a game about a series of challenges. Each of these is a valid way to play, so I'll try not let my preferences color the ...


4

I think you should ask your players what kind of game they want. Do they want to kill other player characters? In the game world, werewolves hate vampires. Vampires hate werewolves, and eat humans. Hunters hunt vampires and werewolves. Not sure about changelings, but basically you're setting up a big bloodbath. If this is what the players want, then be ...


11

The short answer is "Your player is definitely running some sort of con job on you". But here's the specifics for Revised 3rd, with some background from the other editions. Restaurant: The salient points read as follows. The atmosphere is clean, fresh, and warm. You can create any floor plan you desire to limit of the spell's effects. [Up to three ...


1

Spheres in Mage: Ascension overlap each other and even the core rulebook mentions that sufficiently creative player can solve every problem using nearly any sphere (except some specific situation, like accessing Umbra always needs Spirit). However, that said, I had encountered numerous players that use out of game knowledge to justify their effects that ...


2

I have played a similar game to this, I played an awakened zombie, we had a werewolf, a highlander, a vampire and a magi. Why did we stick together? Because we didn't know who else to turn to and everyone was against us. The organisational parts of WoD were, however, very downplayed. The society of each of the "species" of supernaturals was kept at a ...


6

You seem to be building a lot of your challenges as simple riddles with exactly one solution. When I was a newbie DM I tried the same thing and it lead to really slow and tedious sessions where the players were trying to guess the solution. It was frustrating for me because they kept trying one pointless solution after another completely missing my clues ...


0

Think about creating "Key Items" that will play a part in the narrative. Don't necessarily tell the players which item will solve what challenge, but its something that you can do consistently enough so that eventually the players will clue into the fact that they might need an important item to solve a puzzle later.


0

~ Of nudges and dice rolls ~ The main task of the GM is to keep players in character and involved in what's happening. They have two tools to do this; content, and rules. The content way From complex riddles, to gentle nudges, to characters outright stating what to do, your world can be full of hints, tips and tricks that your players can pick up on. A ...


3

Something that I've done to help my players in those situations is to have them make a kind of "intuition check." Basically tell them to make an INT or WIS check, whichever is better for them, and then give them some hint or clue based on the result. If your players are having trouble with a puzzle even after you give them more obvious hints, this could ...


2

I really feel this point needs to be made, if people disagree I will take the down-votes. I feel is answer is necessary because many future readers might get the (incorrect) impression that mixing templates in WoD is a great idea. It isn't. It is cool in other systems (DFRPG, for example) but it isn't here, and this is why and here is my recommendations. I ...


13

While it's possible that your players may not "like to think", as you say, you're almost guaranteed that the PC's will never think like you. It's a common problem for DMs to really understand how different their informed perspective is compared to that of the PC's, and how the "obvious" details just don't stick out of the noise of the game world as presented ...


8

If your players don't want to think, you can't make them. I would just ditch the group and find another one, but in case you don't want to do that: Easy Don't require thinking. Plot is: Monster of the week attacks innocent town. Players need to beat them up to get the loot. - And nothing more. Either they are bored soon from this and demand more challenge ...


3

If you want to, talking directly to your players is a good idea in this scenario. Like: Listen, if I were a grand GM I probably would find a way to form this group even though you don't seem like you want to. But, I'm not yet, so you can continue getting plotted around each other until I get bored or take the bait and follow the plot. If you don't ...


25

The best thing you can do in this situation is understand what the players want and cater to it. It sounds to me like they want to run in and use their skills to beat up the things, and you're looking for the use of cunning and problem-solving to progress forward. You could base campaigns around them carving a swathe through the land with the occasional ...


8

There are a couple of the classic "Campaign Archetypes" (a topic for an essay?) that I think may work. First is: The Deadly Peril Something is out to get the PCs, something bigger than them. You need to make it very, very clear that they cannot survive without working together. Problem is, when one of them inevietably goes off on their own. To keep the ...


0

I personally run a DFRPG that is as "True as Possible" to the source material as I'm a giant Dresden Files fan and I want the game I run to be as close to the source material I love as possible. That said: Your "problem player" isn't running the game and needs to understand the GM limitations. Basically, unless you're a fanatic about the source material, ...



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