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22

If a flying creature takes falling damage from the fall due to being knocked prone, it is prone on the ground, otherwise it lands safely. Prone: When a creature is prone, it is lying down. If the creature is climbing or flying when it is knocked prone, it falls instead. Therefore, flying creatures fall. Flying: Falling Prone: If a creature falls ...


21

No. But there is a way to do it using magic items and the destination point. Have a magic item like Safewing Amulet - lets you land on your feet when falling. Then Teleport to 10 feet above ground. Tada! Standing from a teleport. Using any combination like this works nicely.


21

No. Rules Compendium page 213: If a prone creature teleports, it arrives in the destination square still prone.


18

Yes, if the creature is trained in Acrobatics. It's because of this Acrobatics ability: REDUCE FALLING DAMAGE (Trained only) If a creature that has training in Acrobatics falls, it can make an Acrobatics check to reduce the amount of falling damage it takes. The creature can make this check whether or not the fall is intentional. Action: ...


16

Yes, a prone immobilized creature can stand up. The definition for Immobilized could seem a little fuzzy upon first reading: When a creature is immobilized, it can’t move, unless it teleports or is pulled, pushed, or slid. Until you note that Move is explicitly defined: Any instance of movement, whether it is done willingly or unwillingly. ...


12

No, Part of the definition of ProneDDI is: You can’t move from your space, although you can teleport, crawl, or be forced to move by a pull, a push, or a slide. Lightning shift does not use one of the forms of movement that can allow a creature to move while prone.


11

The PHB says that the Prone condition (p277) makes you grant combat advantage to melee attacks from enemies, and gives you +2 bonus to all defenses to ranged attacks from non-adjacent enemies. Also, it says on p280 that "[w]hen you make a ranged attack against an enemy and other enemies are in the way, your target has cover". My ruling, not supported by ...


11

Standing up from prone is a move action; it does not require a save. From the Rules Compendium, p233: Prone A creature can end this condition on itself by standing up. From the Rules Compendium, p236: Move Actions Stand Up: Stand up from prone It doesn't matter whether you were knocked prone or willingly dropped prone. You can only ...


10

No, a creature cannot use its fly speed while prone Prone The creature is lying down. However, if the creature is climbing or flying, it falls. The only way the creature can move is by crawling, teleporting, or being pulled, pushed, or slid. (Rules Compendium 232, but the DMG says the same thing in different words on page 47) So when a ...


10

Yes. Neither the rules for being prone (page 277), nor the rules for Opportunity Attacks (page 290) prevent prone combatants from making opportunity attacks. (both page numbers are for the fourth edition PHB.)


10

No, you cannot move via Lightning Rush while prone. You can use Lightning Rush against the enemy adjacent to you as the Move part is an effect. Being unable to do it does not limit your attack in any way. Lightning Rush: Effect: Before the attack, you move your speed to a square adjacent to the triggering enemy. Ok, so before the attack you move, ...


9

Yes. Flanking requires that the other person meet the following conditions: Opposite sides (prone characters still occupy the same space as they would if they were standing). Must be Able to Attack (prone characters can still attack).


8

It falls to the ground as normal The Hover keyword does not affect falling prone. As per the compendium entry for Hover: Hover: If a creature can hover, it can remain in the air if it is stunned. Note that the compendium entry for Stunned specifically confirms this: Stunned: The creature falls if it is flying, unless it can hover. Otherwise, it ...


7

The complete rules for the prone condition appear in the Rules Compendium, pp. 232–233. You can voluntarily drop prone as a minor action, but you probably don't want to in normal circumstances. D&D uses the condition to represent falling down in awkward or unsteady ways, not controlled crouches like a rifleman's stance. The only advantage of falling ...


7

Couple of things: It's perfectly acceptable to stand up while prone and grabbed (grabbing immobilizes, but immobilization does not prevent standing from prone). Yes, he can absolutely use acrobatics/athletics to escape, but he'll be prone and as such will not be able to use the free shift. This makes grabbing and proning an effective strategy as it ...


6

Technically, this is something that sort of falls under "DM's discretion". If you want to go strictly by "Rules As Written" then the answer is yes. The pertinent clause, found in PHB 1 page 280, is this: Determining Cover: To determine if a target has cover, choose a corner of a square you occupy (or a corner of your attack’s origin square) and trace ...


6

No you cannot move. From Prone: the only way it can move is by crawling, teleporting or being pushed, pulled or slid. Looks to me like normal movement is prohibited.


5

Yes. Being immobilized only prevents you from moving out of your current space. If someone is standing in your space with you, however, you must shift out of your space to stand from prone, and this is disallowed by being immobilized.


5

Nothing would happen. The grabbed condition ends when The attacker and the target are separated by more squares than the grabber has reach (usually by forced movement) The target succeeds on an escape check The attacker is subject to an effect that prevents free actions. The attacker (or the target) going prone does not meet any of these clauses and ...


4

Yes. Penalties to your AC affect your CMD and you have an AC penalty (to melee attacks at least) when prone.


4

First, here's a list of what exactly Prone does: The creature is lying down. However, if the creature is climbing or flying, it falls. The only way the creature can move is by crawling, teleporting, or being pulled, pushed, or slid. The creature takes a -2 penalty to attack rolls. The creature grants combat advantage to attackers making ...


4

Yes, they are knocked prone in the starting square. An opportunity action is a type of interrupt and thus happens before the move takes place. The move action is then lost as they can no longer walk/run/climb and must crawl. I strongly suggest employing parties of dwarven monsters.


3

Being in the prone position has some advantages. You're harder to hit with melee and ranged attacks. But what is considered prone for D&D 4th ed. My rogue uses hand cross-bows. So could he go prone using a kneeling position (like using a rifle) and gain the benefits for being prone, or is that more of the Squeeze move act? Something to bear in mind ...


3

The rules for a flying creature falling are clear. It falls its speed and if the ground is closer than the value of its speed, it lands safely. That's what it says in the rules. Prone is a condition imposed on one by another, usually. Being knocked prone while flying is NOT the same as falling. The rules for a flyer being knocked prone are clear, it falls ...


3

Even the last reviewDDI of this spell didn't make this point clearer. My reading is that - even if the attack listed in the spell block is not defined as a secondary attack - it complies to the same rules. Under this hypothesis, the attack inherits all the attributes of the encompassing power that are not explicitly overridden (see Rules Compendium, page 96 ...


2

In order to use Lightning Shift while prone, you need to take one of a number of feats or items: In rough order from least onerous to most: Feet slot: Floorfighter Straps Feat: Low Crawl Acrobat's Boots and other effects: while using a minor to stand up isn't exactly shifting while prone, they allow you to shift on the same turn that you were prone. ...


1

There are a few distinctly different parts to this that work independently which you seem to be confusing together, so I'll break things down a bit so you can hopefully understand what's going on. A brief word on conditions Those conditions aren't necessarily things that require saving throws. What they are is just mechanically meaningful states for your ...


1

I'd say the rule book is more or less correct, on page 280, but in this case only if the character behind the prone character is also prone, and only if that character is close behind the one providing the cover. This provision of cover comes at a cost (at least in my ruling) that about half of the miss percentage provided by the prone character providing ...



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