Hot answers tagged

72

It boils down to what kind of style you like. Most systems have an inherent style to the way the world works and people tend to pick the game that fits their favorite style. The style in D&D is medieval (or early renaissance) sword and sorcery, where themes of powerful wizards wielding magic, gods being real and bestowing powers upon their clerics and ...


48

The core objection to Psionics being folded into a Swords and Sorcery / Fantasy RPG (for those who do find it a problem) is rooted in two issues: Damage done to the suspension of disbelief due to genre overlap Additional mechanics with no added value In my experience as both player and GM, it is the second factor that puts a burden on a GM in a psionic ...


35

Note that this answer addresses only whether or not 3.5’s psionics subsystem is imbalanced in comparison to similar options. It does not address whether or not a given DM should allow the material, only whether or not a DM need be concerned about its balance when deciding whether or not to allow it. On a personal note, I heartily recommend that any and all ...


22

This is tricky territory. Assuming you're staying completely within the Agenda and Principles, you're not permitted to lie to the players about what's happening. You're also not permitted to have secret plans that aren't yet part of the actual play. This limits your ability to have unrevealed secrets that you know are true. The nature and fact of a PC's ...


19

No, you won't need psionic combat rules in Pathfinder. Psionic Combat was removed in 3.5. What you have is probably a 3.0 Psionics Handbook. The 3.5 version is called Expanded Psionics Handbook, and is devoid of psionic combat rules; many of the psionic attack and defense modes, like Mind Blast and Tower of Iron Will, were converted to normal powers.


19

Psionic Combat was not removed in Pathfinder so much as it was removed in D&D 3.5. The 3.0 Psionics Handbook (PsiH) was completely overwritten by the 3.5 Expanded Psionics Handbook (XPH), which did not include Psionic Combat. Psionic Combat was a very bad idea for a large number of reasons, though the main one is simply that it was very out of place: it ...


17

Blindsight (monster ability) A creature with blindsight can perceive its surroundings without relying on sight, within a specific radius. Creatures without eyes, such as oozes, and creatures with echolocation or heightened senses, such as bats and true dragons, have this sense. This isn't super helpful mechanically, however it does mention '...


16

An unofficial FAQ created by the community on Wizards' forums says the following: The Psionics Handbook is from 3.0, and is no longer supported. The Expanded Psionics Handbook, despite the name, is a standalone system that replaces the 3.0 system. 3.5 psionics differs from 3.0 psionics far more than current edition magic differs from AD&D 2e ...


15

One, there is no such thing as an “antimagic barrier” – antimagic field does not block line of effect, it only suppresses magic inside of it. All magic can pass through an antimagic field to the opposite side of the field.1 The argument is that the effect of instantaneous Conjuration/Metacreativity (creation) spells/powers can exist inside the antimagic ...


14

No, you cannot augment the bonus human at-will power at all. From the glossary definition of Augmentable: When a racial trait lets an adventurer choose an extra at-will attack power and the adventurer chooses an augmentable at-will attack power, the power loses both the augmentable keyword and its augmentations. I wouldn't recommend making a house ...


14

There are two different varieties of D&D 3 Psionics. The 3.0 Psionics Handbook gave Psions a different key ability score based on their specialisation. Nomads used Dex and Telepaths used Charisma for instance. In the 3.5 update to Psionics, this was changed so that all Psions used Int as their manifesting statistic.


14

What you've mentioned are house rules, not interpretations The RAW is super-simple; forced dream resets the entire turn (or more if you've got some quintessence to hand) and cannot be gainsaid or activate partially. The deck of many things is certainly powerful but it doesn't have any especial resistance to psionic powers. With that in mind, forced dream ...


14

What you posit is reasonable except for one thing: The Deck of Many Things has a random outcome that the DM determines by a die roll. As a magical artifact, I would say that it consists, as a whole of the cards it contains, not of a bunch of independent magical cards. The whole Deck itself is the magic item here, not the cards themselves, they are just ...


14

As the author of Ultimate Psionics, I can verify that anyone can use Autohypnosis, but only the psionic classes tend to have it as a class skill. So go ahead!


14

Your answer can be summed up by: YOU IS UN-ORKY! WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAGH! I'm serious. Even a normal human in presence of a blank feels bit off. A psyker takes it to the next level. Imagine that you have to be close to someone who REALLY, REALLY stinks, to the point where your nose simply stops functioning - not very nice experience, but you can work ...


14

From the Undead Type description: Undead use their Charisma score in place of their Constitution score when calculating hit points, Fortitude saves, and any special ability that relies on Constitution (such as when calculating a breath weapon's DC). That includes Kineticist's blasts.


14

"...experience points sufficient to place him halfway into the next level of experience." This is pretty clear wording, and is basically unchanged from multiple previous RPGs Pathfinder is closely related to (editions 1st to Revised 3rd, at least). This wording has always been used on the various Manuals, and those Manuals have always given you enough ...


13

Calculate the Power Points granted by each class separately, then combine them to form your total pool. So yes, it can be said that your Wilder/Psychic Warrior would receive bonus PP for both Wisdom and Charisma, but these bonus PP would be as appropriate for the manifester levels of each class. For example, a Wilder 6/Psychic Warrior 2 with Wisdom 14 and ...


13

There are three kinds of gaming tables in regards to psionics: Those who do not use it and are happy with it. You can play D&D completely without psionics and have a good and healthy gaming experience. There are no psionic powers in the world and the players do not possess any either. The standard campaigns most of the time do this, because psionics ...


12

Fiend Folio has numerous “symbionts” that have various influences, up to and including total control, when implanted in a creature’s mind (or elsewhere). The cerebral symbionts, in particular, seem quite appropriate. Eberron Campaign Setting and Magic of Eberron have a few more, as do a few Dragon magazine articles. This Fleshwarping ...


12

If no restriction is listed (and I can confirm that none is), no restriction exists. It’s related to psionics because the only classes that have it in-class are psionic classes, but others can use it just fine. As you say, there’s no reason it should be restricted, and lo and behold, it’s not.


12

In the D&D podcast of July 10 Mike Mearls describes it, starting at about 14:00, as The power of the mind. It is a power source that comes from within... it derives from the opening of the mind's eye.... He then goes on to discuss how the Far Realm in D&D cosmology "bumps into" our planes and "can twist reality a little bit." Continuing, ...


12

You can become a truth seeker, which to my knowledge was never officially updated. The requirements are easily met (nonevil, base attack bonus +5, three feats, and two skills). At 1st level, a truth seeker learns two of the ten psionic combat modes. This option is superior to the prestige class ruby disciple because the latter progresses combat modes "...


11

Paizo has studiously avoided publishing a single official word on psionics. The only psionics rules are from a third party, Dreamscarred Press, but are in the online Pathfinder SRD. According to those rules, if you are using magic-psionics transparency, then you treat powers just like spells or spell-like abilities, so yes, detect magic would detect and ...


11

Actually, there is a creature in the core D&D 3.5 rules with the ability to possess creatures! The ghost, available to player characters with a level adjustment of +5, has an ability called "malevolence" which allows it to possess any creature. Simply re-skin the ghost as a parasite instead of an undead. Here's how I'd stat up your parasite: Start ...


10

I had the same confusion for a while, but thankfully, that's not the case. You can only spend a number of power points equal to your level on any particular manifest. Some powers allow you to spend more than their base cost to achieve an improved effect, or augment the power. The maximum number of points you can spend on a power (for any reason) is ...


10

Psionics have now been converted to Pathfinder rules officially via Psionics Unleashed from Dreamscarred Press. It was open play tested prior to publication so the rules seem pretty solid. I've been running a Psion (started at 1st at 5th now) and haven't run into anything weird. It might be worth noting now that Dreamscarred has continued to support ...


10

Psionic Power also contains no rituals. The skill used for a ritual doesn't affect anything mechanically, so you can reflavor rituals as psionic without issue -- I do this for my psion. But yeah, it seems like a bit of a lack. It's probably worth noting that rituals don't have an associated power source, just associated skills. WotC decided not to add a ...


10

Unless a WotC board member comes strolling on to this site, it is hard to come up with an answer that isn't hearsay and speculation. We know that the original 3.0 SRD is published in 2000, and came to include the base system of the time, as well as the significant 3.0 subsystems: Psionics (Psionics Handbook, March 1 2001) Divine (Deities and Demigods, ...


10

There is no Pathfinder-specific Dark Sun material Dark Sun is the property of Wizards of the Coast and Paizo's not allowed to touch it; that part's pretty simple. Additionally, Paizo has not published any first-party psionic material for Pathfinder, though Dreamscarred Press has done some phenomenal third-party stuff for that system that I highly suggest to ...



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