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Run Different Modules When we run 3.5 or Pathfinder published adventures, we always aim for a party of characters half the lowest recommended level. This is quite difficult, especially at higher levels, but it is quite doable and a fun challenge for high-op games. Probably half the expected level would be a bit steep for new players, but some lesser ...


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The 3.5 adventure Expedition to the Demonweb Pits starts in the city of Sigil with options to get the players to the Astral.


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Utilize Advanced Creatures. If your PC's are absolutely rolling through the opposition, its clear that the opposition needs a buff to get them on the same level of challenge, this is probably your best bet. This will have them likely digging into the many resources like Hero points that you've provided and up the Ante on any Encounter. At first I would use ...


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Let's talk gaming philosophy. My belief is that, most of the time, what players want out of combat is to show off how awesome their characters are. Sometimes they might want interesting tactical choices, sometimes they might want roleplaying, but most of the time what they want is to get to actually use their cool new spells and techniques. With that in ...


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The point of Dungeon World published adventures is, like all published adventures, to take some of the burden of prep off of the GM. But in Dungeon World, prep is limited to detailing fronts and drawing maps with blanks (both literally and metaphorically). So published adventures in general just do some or all of that for you. A good DW published product ...


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The only one I am aware of was produced for one of the 'Free RPG Day' a couple of years ago as a demonstration game. It was called The Slave-Pit of Drazhu, and is intended to run for approximately 2 hours. Having played through it with a DM who didn't really know what they were doing, it was extremely clear how having a good grip on the principle of the ...


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The DM of the campaign I'm in now uses the "describe the journey" approach, except he also wrote out this great table for stuff that can happen along the way. He roles once for every X miles we have to travel (or however many he feels like) and...things happen. Think Oregon Trail with orcs. Sometimes a party member will show up at the destination hungover, ...


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You seem to already have a great solution for how to transport the PCs from where they are to where they need to be. The tornado idea does a good job of both covering the necessary distance and giving them an immediate reason to be interested in this new story. It also has a cool Wizard of Oz feel :) Your real problem is tying them into the other factions, ...


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Allow me to challenge the unspoken assumption in your question (noting that I like your ideas): If you had created the next adventure for your players (instead of buying it), would you have placed it 1500 miles away? Of course you wouldn't; you would place it "over the hill" or "two blocks down". The point is that you are not a slave to the writer's vision ...


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Fade to black Have them start in one location, describe the need for them to move from one place to another, explain what happens during their journey, fade to black, then roleplay their arrival at the new location.


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Make an adventure of it by using the Maguffin Hunt trope. This boils down to giving the PCs a reason to chase something or someone (the "maguffin") to the location of their first encounter with the cults from the module that you bought. For example: A NPC hires the group to return their wayward offspring, who has gone to join some odd religious group. ...


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Do what authors do when dealing with this kind of issue. Just have some quick exposition and move on. If I have a party that is in one village and they need to get to another village a long way away but I don't want to have anything important happen along the way, then I just describe the journey and have them arrive at their destination. This doesn't mean ...


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If you're willing to do a bit of work, you could just graft Winterhaven into the place of Red Larch in Princes of the Apocalypse and have the elemental cults menace the players in their established home, which they'll be well-motivated to defend. The exact shape of the map isn't really crucial to the adventure, just that the various cult sites are somewhere ...


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I have high praise for Church and State for Mutants and Masterminds 1E. It provides a series of events that are likely to happpen, but leaves a lot of the bridging flexible, and accounts for different outcomes in earlier steps. It also has some good advice for how to deal with problem powers among the players and attempts to shortcut the mystery. The big ...


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Two important bits of advice, somewhat linked. First, combat isn't the only way through the approach to the keep: my group's sorceror bluffed the group through every encounter except the first. A little bit of draconic to lend credence and a reasonably believable story ("these humans are prisoners, we're taking them to etc, happy looting") should get them ...



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