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13

No, we don't have evidence about the whole industry, let alone specific data on revenue that would give us the ability to extrapolate to the effects on the whole industry, because too few companies share the kinds of sales information necessary to do such a wide-scale analysis. There are anecdotes aplenty about how digital effects individual companies, but ...


11

There's a formal breakdown This breakdown is generally considered true across the RPG (and for that matter videogame) community, making for three classes of material: First Party Material is created and/or published by the developer directly (such as Paizo publishing for Pathfinder or Nintendo making a game for the Wii U). This can be hard copy books ...


10

If you're developing your own RPG and you and your friends enjoy it, that's great! If you want to play a particular way, and creating your own thing to let you play that way is what makes you happy, then there's nothing you need to worry about. There's nothing wrong with developing another, whether it's for yourself or others - that isn't a bad thing at all, ...


7

Vincent Baker's blog "Anyway" has a ton of valuable information, including both theory and sales/publishing information. In any given post, there's a lot of smart discussion as well. A good theory/idea listing is right here. Vincent is a GREAT resource and you should ask questions! (I think he also has a good following on Google Plus, so there may be ...


6

On the definition of "official" The question posed in the title "What is an “official” supplement in the context of D&D 3.5?" does not have an answer, as far as I can tell. The word "official" is not defined in any D&D supplement to my knowledge. But there are a few possible interpretations of the word, thanks to Wizards of the Coast's publishing ...


5

There's a few options that you can use in tandem. Blog Blog is easy, goes right with your core website. The tricky part to the blog is if it is not something you are already doing, do not try to do it "just to do it" - update once month at least, but don't spam out updates just to fill content. Meaningful content is more useful than just updating all the ...


5

One of the best way is to start a blog and develop an audience. The downside is that it is a slow way to start. However if you are successful in attracting readers then the odds of finding an initial market with your RPG is much higher. This the process that allowed me to have a small amount of success selling products with my Bat in the Attic Games.


5

No one will care about your game in 35 years. You will be lucky if they care about it in 3 years. If they do care about it in 35 years, doubtless you will have a new version with new art. D&D isn't still using the same illustrations from 35 years ago now are they? Many people, and I see this in the tech startup world all the time, get wrapped around ...


4

It would seem that Posthuman Studios gets works made as a "work made for hire" then releases them under CC licenses. It wouldn't surprise me overly if other games used a similar system; the copyright licenses in the most recent Earthdawn, Shadowrun, and Legend of the 5 Rings (just what I happened to have) don't mention any distinctions between licensed art ...


3

Disclaimer: I am a featured reviewer at DriveThruRPG. Yes and No Yes, digital sales hurt print vendors, such as bookshops. On the other hand, however, they're not hurting the industry of gaming. Admittedly, one could argue that some of the practices are perhaps a little sketchy (Catalyst putting out fifteen guns or drones or vehicles for Shadowrun every ...


2

Yes, of course, you should. But a few words of warning... First and foremost, expect to do a lot of work on it: writing is not the same thing as playing with friends. You must make it all understandable and clear to complete strangers. Also, friends are great play testers but not nearly sufficient. Nor are they proof readers. Second, do expect people to ...


2

Take a look at a new book called "Fantasy Art Characters To Copy." It features original "conditional" copyright free fantasy characters. The conditions of use are very liberal.I have the book - it's incredible. The images are high quality, they are not stock pics. They are on blank backgrounds and you can copy them for RPGs or use them in your own ...


2

As others have indicated, there really are no solid industry-wide figures. While Wizards of the Coast seems to have a conflicted relationship with PDFs, smaller players have embraced them. You can mine these reports for information: Posthuman Studios: Their 2010 Year End Review goes through their numbers, which I've summarized in this blog post. Not only ...


1

The best information you can get about this is from publishers themselves. Many of them run both print and PDF product lines. I recall, but cannot now find a publisher discussing the cost-analysis of when to have a product go from print to PDF and when to release a niche product directly to PDF. It is by no means simple and of course entirely up to the ...



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