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24

You can download the official Fate Core font from Evil Hat's licensing page, as well as the "Powered by Fate" logo. This font contains a small number of glyphs, supporting Fudge Dice faces (0, +, -), the Four Actions (A, D, C, O), and some stress track boxes. They ask that you credit them in the works where you use it. Side note: Since you're ...


24

They're for what they say on the tin: they're built as a general reference document for the game. What goes into them exactly depends on what the authors decided to put in there to build that reference — there's no set standard. Some SRDs are enormously comprehensive libraries of just about everything or even the full text of the game, some are far ...


20

OK, so here's game intellectual property 101. There are niche exceptions to all of it, but at a high level it's going to hold for 99% of use cases in the free world. If you don't already know all the stuff below you should not enter into any commercial enterprise based on someone else's IP without professional legal advice. You are never free to use ...


15

While I'm not a lawyer, I'd suspect that part of your liability here is determined by the method you do the 5e updates. Are you talking about republishing them, including maps and flavor text? If so, I'd be very cautious, especially given WotC's proclivity to shut down 3rd party resources for older versions of the game. However, a simple listing of changes ...


14

Economies of scale. From Fred Hicks of Evil Hat, publishers of FAE: We printed like 13,000 copies of those. Because we hit that economy of scale, our actual cost (not counting up front costs of writing — minimal — and art — reasonable) came in at less than 40 cents per copy (close to 35). To make a MSRP $5, 40-page book work for distribution our costs ...


13

You do not need to do anything special to get your work protected, as it is already protected from the moment you make it. You only need to register your copyright if you actually want to get involved in a lawsuit involving copyright. From the US Copyright Office FAQ: Do I have to register with your office to be protected? No. In general, ...


11

It's part of their marketing strategy. FAE is a simpler version of Fate; if you want something with a little more detail, you'll want to buy one of Evil Hat's other Fate-based products. "If this little taste interested you, why not buy one of our other products?" The other advantage of having a low-cost entry point for the Fate system is that it leads to ...


11

Get a Wordpress site. Publish your Google Doc as a PDF and post it for download there. Now people can search for your site via Google, at least theoretically, and you can give them a URL that's human-readable. All of the above is free, and you'll be in good company. An unsupported Google Doc is not a professional-looking distribution platform and is a ...


10

Your stated motive is to make the old material available to a new generation of gamers. You're not really interested in just writing conversion notes that require the originals — you want to include the maps, descriptive passages, and all the rest of the creative content that makes these adventures awesome. The correct, ethical, and legal means of doing so ...


10

Publishing the old content in full is illegal and unethical, just as it is for new content. It's owned by WotC or GW or whoever, and if they wanted to sell it they would (they're making more old adventures available over time in PDF, actually). Those authors, artists, mapmakers, etc. were compensated by TSR/WotC for their work and have no explicit or ...


9

Talk to a Lawyer This should always be the answer for copyright questions. That said, what you are asking about is largely known as parody. However the legal protections of parody are a complicated matter and may require a lawsuit to defend. Thus, you should consult a copyright lawyer before attempting to publish any material derived from these campaigns. ...


7

Fonts The manual uses Gotham (usually bold) for the sans serif titles and callouts, and Garamond for the main text. The example gameplay passages use GFY Thornesmith. Evil Hat have their own font for the Fate action glyphs. Gotham is a priced font, but I hear Google's Montserrat is a good substitute and uses the SIL Open Font License. Garamond has priced ...


4

"Not only will you not get [your book] looked at, you won't get it published." R.A. Salvatore, during a Meet the Author speech, stated this and added that not only would it limit you to one specific license that you could sell it to, but you would have to have every citation perfect. He suggests writing something generic that could fit in to a genre and if ...


4

Ask, do, oblige. That's what I'd do, anyway. And let's get that disclaimer out of the way ASAP: I'm not a lawyer and have no professional acumen. Since you're referring to the age of magazines, I'm going to assume these are 10+ year old articles. There's a small chance that those are now out of copyright, but I certainly wouldn't rely on it. Instead, I ...


1

I'd encourage you to get someone with official copyright hold over Deva answer this. Perhaps even here. Copyright The name itself cannot be copyrighted, but character can and most likely is. More info here: Are the Gods in Forgotten Realms under copyright? L5R and AEG, if it's any indicator From my own experience with AEG and L5R, the answer was: ...



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