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-2

Copyright is quite complex and can be confusing when it comes to copyrighting novels or rpg materials or computer programs. Many of the rules are logical but some are completely defying logic. Also a problem there is that laws depend on the appropriate country and how the companies and their lawyers (try to) interpret them. The main problem is always to ...


-4

As long as you are not posting stat blocks of monsters or NPCs (other than of your own creation) it is fine.


9

The simple answer is that it's legal but if Hasbro decide to sue you it won't matter because you won't have the cash to argue and anyway they'll lean on your hosting service who will cut you off in a moment. This is exactly the state things got to in the dying days of TSR (when they became known as They Sue Regularly); they never got anywhere near a court ...


10

Short terms can't be copyrighted, and your actual play is highly unlikely to contain reproductions of passages of WotC-copyrighted material unless you're cutting and pasting material from the adventures or books for some odd reason. There is one common misstep that you might need to deliberately avoid though: it is a widespread practice to decorate blog ...


28

TL;DR If thousands of other people are doing exactly the same thing for years on the net and the current employees of the firm are endorsing it (by participating, streaming, tweeting, linking-to, it) you are in the clear. There are literally tens-of-thousands of blog posts, wikis, podcasts, and vlogs of actual-play including by D&D employees past and ...


0

To echo @adriano above: I am not a lawyer, so don't think what I'm about to say has weight in a court of law. But I will mention that there are precedents for this sort of thing in the past: There's an actual play write-up on Hack & Slash for 5E at the moment. Also RPPR recently podcast an actual play session of 5E. So lawsuit seems unlikely, but ...



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