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3

Assuming that this is written with U.S. law in mind, game rules cannot be copyrighted, at all; neither can words. Thus, you can certainly use the same names for ability scores without infringing on copyright. From the U.S. Copyright Office circular on games: Copyright does not protect the idea for a game, its name or title, or the method or methods for ...


9

Yes I am not a lawyer and anyone can sue anyone for anything. However... Many RPGs, not under license from D&D using the OGL or otherwise, have used identically named ability scores since 1975 with no legal problems; see this great breakdown of key ability scores in major fantasy games through 1983. Some have more, some have less, most use at least 5 ...


1

Yes. It's perfectly legal to do so. It's also perfectly legal for WotC to sue you in civil court for doing so and seek (hugely excessive) damages. Your ability to win that lawsuit depends to what degree you can argue that your product is not substantially based on WotC's product. Currently, especially in America(United States of), courts have taken ...


1

Here is what WOTC's site has to say about abilities being open content: The System Reference Document is a comprehensive toolbox consisting of rules, races, classes, feats, skills, various systems, spells, magic items, and monsters compatible with the d20 System version of Dungeons & Dragons and various other roleplaying games from Wizards of the ...


2

Firstly, take any advice from me or anyone else who isn't a lawyer with a grain of salt. In my knowledge, it is completely legal to create, use, and manufacture an RPG or other product with the same statistics as the traditional Dungeons and Dragons ones. That being said, if the product you create too closely resembles another copyrighted product, it can ...


2

Sure, if you want to include the OGL! Well, yes, you can definitely because it's under OGL. Actually re-reading the OGL, I noticed that you would have to staple it to your finished product, but you're not actually compelled to license anything of your own under the OGL. But do you have to? Game mechanics in and of themselves are not typically covered ...


15

Short version: Str/Con/Dex/Int/Wis/Cha appears to be available for use, but tread carefully. This is a very gray area, and any advice you get isn't worth much, unless it's from your lawyer. If you copy all of D&D's design, your work clearly infringes on their copyright, and they can easily succeed in a lawsuit against you. If you copy none of their ...


1

I would suggest looking at the Dresden Files RPG: Our World book. Although there are a number of difference between DF flavored Fate and Core Fate, it will still give you a very good idea of how to present both generic and specific NPCs. However, to answer the specific question, you should probably include stat blocks, with two or three difficulty ...



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