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6

Pack tactics is probably too strong, wolf bite doesn't scale and change form is too weak. Overall, this jibes fairly well with what you're looking for when you are creating a custom race, though it's probably not ideal and I'll explain why in a minute. First let's address the specifics: Pack Tactics is typically a monster quality, it's probably not super ...


3

I am often a fan of a gritty campaign that offers deep personal challenges to the players. For example, my Druids really struggled with the unliving gray stone of our urban campaign. We made the most of the role play and enjoyed our weaknesses as much as our strengths. In such a campaign, character weaknesses and flaws are to be embraced rather than ...


0

Drow Need Eye Protection You need to protect your eyes, of course, to negate that sunlight sensitivity. Your DM will need to choose what to do, but there are plenty of things that most DMs will allow: Wrap thin cloth around your character's head, reducing the incoming light. Find the equivalent of sunglasses, or wear armor with a visor. They essentially ...


7

There is no disadvantage on spells that require saves, only on attack rolls. Since drow racial abilities synergize well with being a Charisma-based caster, Sunlight Sensitivity is not such a harsh penalty as it might seem initially. You can get around the penalty by playing a caster with cantrips and spells that do not require an attack roll, but use a ...


-6

Editting Again to hopefully make my answer more clear. You know how you can cast a light spell inside a scroll tube to make a flashlight? Could you use the same mechanic to cast a darkness spell into a scroll tube to shine the darkness upward to create the shade your character so dearly needs? My reasoning for this is that no light can penetrate the ...


3

Build a Drow Shadow Monk/Warlock who literally carries around a cloud of darkness with him. This excellent answer to my own question Is there anyway to see through Darkness without removing it? was about letting me create a Batman style character 5e that let me utilize the Shadow monk's many darkness related abilities at will by dipping into Warlock so he ...


4

I think the correct answer is that you do NOT 'get around' the drow's light sensitivity per se. If you find some way to negate the downsides of playing a drow, you lose a lot of the flavor of the character's race. keep in mind that there are racial advantages as well, which may offset the penalties if the story frequently takes the party into caves or other ...


1

Most people don't generally become adventurers the moment they become physically adult sized. For humans, physical decay kicks in shortly after adolescence. Your muscles tend to get weaker and it takes more effort to keep them strong. Your brain gets full of knowledge, but it stops learning new things as fast or as easily (possibly because of that ...


2

Statistically speaking adventurers of any race have short careers because they live exceedingly risky lives battling hordes of goblins and orcs, all manner of supernatural creatures, the undead, mind boggling horrors, and even the occasional flamethrower-toting dragon. As a result many adventurers are killed before they have the chance to live very long and ...


0

"How do I build a campaign setting that makes sense when elves live hundreds of years and should be mostly high-level characters?" Are you talking about players or NPCs? If you're talking about players, then you may need to tell them to change their backstory. A 200-year-old elf that's a veteran of a dozen wars wouldn't be clearing the Inn's basement of ...


2

My answer will draw from other answers, but give a reason why based on stats. Elves of every type take longer to learn things in order to learn them proficiently by their own standards. This can be evidenced by the stat modifiers that elves have, while not attributing them to anything outside the range of their stats. Apply the stat modifiers to a ...


-2

Speaking as a D&D newbie (so my thinking is as much inspired by Tolkien as D&D): The core issue here is that two starting characters with very different ages have similar skillsets/levels. Some answers I see here focus on producing a reasonable explanation as to why the age difference would not provide an Elf an advantage. I still think this is ...


1

Why should Elves all be high level characters? In addition to what others have said about taking time to learn Elven culture, why bother learning human things? If you know you're going to live effectively forever barring something terrible happening, why not wait until tomorrow? There's no sense of urgency toward doing anything. Further, for creatures who'd ...


5

Humans live longer today than they did in the (relatively recent) past, but they're less well prepared for life until later in life than they were back then. Medieval folks would already be training for their adult occupation by the time they were 12-15 years-old. These days, they're considered children, and barely trusted to walk to their friends' houses, ...


-4

The current answers try to patch the existing setting in order to make sense out of this broken and unexplained stereotype: the elves live much longer than humans. If you want to fix the level inbalance problem, the best approach you can take is just to scrap the silly "the elves live longer" rule, assume they live more or less as much as the humans, and ...


7

An excellent resource for you to consider: So You Want to Play an Elf? This is fan-work, not official, but it is written by a fan with a deep knowledge of the setting of D&D. It provides a very interesting look into elven society and personality, and the concept of long time goes a long way towards explaining why elves take so long doing things. ...


32

Elves don't get their first character level until age 120. That means they spend a lot of time until then doing... well... something. If we look at humans and what they learn in their first 15 or so years, we can come to quite a range of different subjects. As toddlers, we learn to communicate. This takes quite a few years to do proficiently. Making ...


43

Let me start by saying that this is a well-known potential "fallacy" in the settings/rule interaction Human Level 1 Fighter: "Let me get this straight. You're a hundred and twenty." Elf Level 1 Fighter: "Right." Human Level 1 Fighter: "And I'm sixteen." Elf Level 1 Fighter: "Right?" Human Level 1 Fighter: "And we're equally skilled even though ...


13

Probably the only "true" answer here is that it's handwaved because the rules are there to create a game that makes sense for the players, but that's not a very fun answer. So... ...elves stay among other elves well into their second century and don't go out adventuring; in fact, like humans, many never go adventuring, so even elves nearing their 700-year ...


2

Not all elves are old right now Your question assumes that all elves are already hundreds of years old. Just as all humans on earth are not 75, all elves in a Dungeons and Dragons campaign are not on their deathbeds with many tales to tell of adventures long finished. Cultural Differences Additionally, there may be cultural influences in your world where ...


9

Rules for custom races are in the Advanced Race Guide. It uses a point-buy system for choosing size, speed, traits, spell-like abilities, etc. There's also an online version, though it can be a little clunkier to use.



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