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3

As a GM, Never Decide A Correct Course of Action, Only Decide Consequences As a GM your calling is to create a great story. Stories are about conflicts that arise as characters with motivations make choices. Thus, the best thing you can do as a GM is to structure the 'adventure' to be about the story and the conflicts, and not about something concrete being ...


1

When I'm planning an adventure, I try to put myself in the PCs' shoes and determine what the next likely course of action for them is, given their motivations and knowledge. I then spend the most time planning for what they're likely to do. I'm not always right about what they plan on doing. Sometimes I overlook something that was important to them, which ...


1

I'd like to share a story with you about how one of my campaigns began to illustrate how I handled a situation like this. “Shopping, some bandits, and an execution gone wrong” At the start of this campaign, the party found itself in the hometown of one of the party members. They were made aware of an execution which was scheduled to happen at noon, but ...


2

One approach is to think about how stories generally tend to work. There may well be moments when a hero has a moment of doubt or uncertainty but the existence of the story (in hindsight) mean, by it's very existence that they went ahead anyway. As a GM you can have a certain role as 'fate' to keep the heroic story ticking over, obviously there are serious ...


0

I would recommend #4 of SevenSidedDie (let them avoid the adventure) but with a twist. This method takes a long preparation so if you don't have much time you may ignore it. Map out immediate area around the group. Nearby towns, their merchants smaller quests, rumors and things like these. So that if they fall off track, let them roam around and enjoy the ...


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As a corollary to some of the other answers here, note that your players might just be on your side. GM: "You see a thief running towards the marketplace, and-" Players: "Oh, good! We should chase him! That'll give us a good excuse to meet up with everyone else!" If you all want the same thing - and in this case, you probably do - there's no need to "get"...


53

Firstly, the assumption you're making is well-meaning, but wrong: as DM you shouldn't feel like you can never “break character” to just speak as a person to the other people at the table. You're playing a game, and sometimes you need to pause playing and just talk about the game directly. It may seem counter-intuitive, but games work much better when you've ...


0

Welcome, Your question is somewhat opinion based but I will cover a few play tested styles and situations in my response. example: We turn around and go home This one is easily prevented, often there are reasons not to turn around and go home, I particularly enjoy catering potential quest rewards to the players characters. For example, when creating ...


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It's pretty much up to you. Players won't like to feel like they're being forced down corridors, but it's hard to craft a coherent day's play on the fly (especially if you're just starting out). For now, I'd recommend being honest with your players and saying "Guys, I'm new to this, cancelling the mission will mean me winging everything and it probably won't ...



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