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15

There is Dizzy Dragon's generator which has a variety of layouts and is oriented to Moldavy B/x D&D. There is Donjon's generator which has D&D 3.5 and D&D 4.0 options. But the layout are strictly room and corridor. Both create the encounters for you. Of the two Dizzy Dragon is the best.


13

You can turn an encounter table into a story by crossing elements off as they come up, and shifting the numbers appropriately (so that after 4 is rolled, it's crossed off, and the old five is now four). This dovetails nicely with the previous idea of changing die size, since the trick is that the most interesting encounters are on higher numbers, and as ...


13

In the wilderness I use a simple d6 or d8 and fill it with creatures depending on the surrounding areas. I'll usually have two or three extra entries and will add +2 or +3 at night. Thus, the first two or three entries are day-time only where as the last two or three creatures are night-time only. The creatures encountered depend solely on the surrounding ...


13

Ok there are a number of factors, in what you are seeing. Sampling Bias One is sampling bias. You have been looking at char-ops threads. Your sample is not all RPG players, only those who choose to talk about it on the internet. You have also likely looked only at systems you are interested in/have heard of. It is not a representative sample. Further, ...


11

You might want Dizzy Dragon's generator. It does encounters and treasure, although no random encounters. The dungeons are generated from geomorphs, so the maps are more complex and interesting than the fully random versions. Each map will have some three dimensionality, with stairs up to some sections and so forth.


11

I'm shamelessly quoting from 4e here, but I think the following applies in most (non-mechanized) RPG's at least to some extent. Hit Points Over the course of a battle, you take damage from attacks. Hit points (hp) measure your ability to stand up to punishment, turn deadly strikes into glancing blows, and stay on your feet throughout a battle. Hit ...


10

I agree with Numenetics. Also, I've arranged the tables to take advantage of the bell-curve you get from rolling multiple dice (3d6 or the like). So the monsters at the middle of the table are more likely to occur than those at the ends. I also have "countdown" tables. Say you have a portal to the Abyss slowly opening in your dungeon. Every day it ...


7

I Think this donjon page would work for what you want, and if it doesn't, then one of the other generators on the site might.


6

One good idea is to use different die types depending on the time of day, or the season, how close the party is to civilisation, and so on. For example, if the nastier things come out at night, then you might stack those encounters at the top end of a 2d10 table, but during the day, you only roll 1d10+1d6. Close to town, you might only roll 1d10. It's also ...


6

I've never been a fan of wandering monster table, but random encounters. The difference being that each of the encounters or situations is occuring when the players arrive at the scene. I'll try not to give too bad of an example. Players come across two goblins fighting over a large fish. They have each other in headlocks and rolling around on the ...


5

I could see a magical hit having potential to do a constant damage. Same with an explosion. A burst that's going to effect an area the same each time could have a constant damage. Something that's based more physically on where and how it lands on the body would have a greater variation of damage. Edit - I've had some time to think about this... I don't ...


5

Not sure if this is what you mean, but I think that making wilderness encounter tables level-independent increases their utility in creating interesting scenarios because it provides great opportunities to solve problems in ways other than direct combat, including running. I've had characters run from a nasty wilderness encounter and mark the area on the ...


5

There is a 4e random generator on donjon.sh, which isn't 4e specific or anything, although the output doesn't look much like yours. Abulafia has a ton of generators in the fantasy category -- check out Fantasy Town and perhaps Fantasy Town Event.


5

Medieval Demographics is one of my goto sites on generating material.


5

Check out Kellri's CDD#4. It has a good section on settlement design (written for AD&D 1e, but easily adaptable to other editions). Another resource that's less useful for the nitty-gritty details but is great for inspiration is the Settlements and Countries section of Tables for Fables. It's eclectic and not very well organized, but it's a treasure ...


5

Been a while since I've used these and I think most are 3rd ed at best but they are good to have around for ideas. I still use the tavern one all the time. http://www.rdinn.com/town_generator.php http://jtevans.kilnar.com/rpg/dnd/tools/ For taverns try: http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/dnd/20010223d


5

Constant damage is, IMHO, a little boring. It makes it very predictable. If we look at it realistically, the more mechanical the weapon, and the less external factors, the lower should the variance be. A mounted gun shooting at an stationary target in a room with no wind should have a variance close to 0 (constant damage). If however the same gun is used ...


5

I would interpret "5 damage" as coming from something that was a very stable and predictable effect (being on fire, or in a torture device of some kind), while "1d10 damage" would be for things where there's a certain random element (swinging a sword - do you hit cleanly, is it blocked a little or a lot, etc.) Also worth noting that static damage can also ...


5

Randomly rolling dice to determine stats, and requiring training to use XP to level up, are rules in some editions of D&D but not in others. Specifically, these were done away with or made optional as of 2nd edition AD&D. Gamers who started playing some form of D&D published within the last 25 years therefore don't consider training for levels ...


4

I've seen people write up random encounter charts with more than just monsters on 'em: weather-related challenges, terrain obstacles, interesting locations or just plain, you know, random stuff ("While tromping through the swamp, one randomly-selected character falls, face-first, into the mud, no save. Character is all mucky and stuff, smells bad and gets a ...


4

I think the glowcoder's answer is correct, despite his re-thinking of it. A solid 5 damage, represents to me a magical affect, or a Character with magical luck. I.e. there is no variance in the damage. A possible (ok, a real stretch) real world comparison might be a laser or radiation. I.e., either damage is done, and it is known damage, or it is ...


4

Although realistic is not a term I like to use in a game discussion, there is no realistic means of damage (maybe except a life force drain using magic or something) which would to each time the same damage, when we use a human or normal animal or anything with a physiology which is more complex than an amoeba as target. And possibly, I do the amoeba wrong ...


4

In Mystic Empyrean the players create the world as they explore it with a mix of individual authority, shared authority, and random card draws. It's non-traditional in a lot of ways though, so not everyone's cup of tea. It is definitely a worthwhile example of how such a system could be built. Studying the interplay between the system mechanics, character ...


4

Microscope Microscope is a good example of what you're wanting, but it does not occur during gameplay of another game. Essentially, it is a collaborative world-building game where you and the other players work together to create a universe. Play begins with a list of must and must-nots that the players determine one at a time, until someone declines to ...


4

I have used Donjon myself, but not in a while. I just checked it, and the site is up. I find the site usable, but lacking. Other Creator I have not used: Wizards Third Edition (3.5) Dungeons and Dragons Character Generator


4

Assumptions about how a PC fits into the fantasy world have changed over time. In D&D 4E, a level 1 PC is already beyond most of their society. In 3.5 (and Pathfinder) a level 1 PC is heroic, but might be outclassed by other heroes. Although I've never played D&D second edition, I have a handbook that seems to suggests low level PCs aren't ...


3

The donjon 4e Random Encounter Generator is a decent random encounter generator. It's not a table, per se, but it has terrain/plane filters and random attached treasure.


3

Abulafia Abulafia is a special kind of wiki - it's built to support the creation and use of random generators. So, if one of the generators on this page - like the Fantasy Adventure Generator or the Fantasy Scenario Generator - doesn't do what you want, you can start crafting the generator that does do what you want. And because it, like StackExchange, is ...


3

Here are a couple good ones: http://www.monsteradvancer.com/ (also has other generators) http://www.dmtools.org/encounters.php http://www.sulerin.com/creatures/ (try dropping the creatures part if that doesn't work) For my purposes they didn't use enough resources I have something like 300 pdf resources and wanted to generate something that had roughly ...



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