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40

If that's the way they want to roleplay their character than why not let them? Why does it matter to you (or anyone else) if they don't "hate" their Favoured Enemy? The PHB says: you have significant experience studying, tracking, hunting, and even talking to a certain type of enemy (pg. 91). Nothing in there says anything about them having to hate ...


27

In the PHB pg 164 it gives you the multiclass table for what proficiencies you gain once you place 1 level into Druid (or any other class). Note on this table it also reminds you that Druids will NOT wear any armor or use any shields made of metal, just like it does in the Druid section earlier in the book. Thus your answer becomes: No, you may not wear ...


20

You trigger the effect of this spell once. The next time you hit a creature with a ranged weapon attack before the spell ends, this spell creates a rain of thorns that sprouts from your ranged weapon or ammunition. Just as the spell text says, this will trigger the next time you hit a creature with a weapon attack. Not every time you hit a creature ...


17

Yes There is nothing that prohibits this interaction. The ranged attacks made from Volley count as weapon attacks, so any of them can be used as the "trigger" for Horde Breaker. Note however that Horde Breaker allows you to do this only once on each of your turns, so you can't trigger it on each of the Volley attacks, but only on one. In your example, you ...


16

Yes See pp. 173-174 of the PHB, specifically the delineation of the "three main rolls of the game--the ability check, the saving throw, and the attack roll" and the following description of skills: Each ability covers a broad range of capabilities, including skills that a character or a monster can be proficient in. [Emphasis added.] Any History check ...


16

Unless your DM explicitly creates houserules that allow you to make your companion into a familiar, no, there is no way to do this. The Find Familiar spell lets a wizard gain the service of a familiar, a spirit that takes an animal form you choose: bat, cat, crab, frog (toad), hawk, lizard, octopus, owl, poisonous snake, fish (quipper), rat, raven, sea ...


15

The 3rd level ability allows a Beast Master Ranger to "Choose a beast that is no larger than medium and has a challenge rating of 1/4 or lower" and "If the beast dies, you can obtain another one ..." "Another one" means the same type of beast as the first i.e. no larger than Medium with CR 1/4 or less. As an aside: the Beast Master Ranger is a relatively ...


11

They can cast any spells on the appropriate spell list, they do not have a specific number of spells known. Ranger A ranger may prepare and cast any spell on the ranger spell list, provided that he can cast spells of that level, but he must choose which spells to prepare during his daily meditation. Druid A druid may prepare and cast any spell on ...


11

Yes. The colossus slayer description uses the general term "weapon", and from the Weapons section in the PHB (page 146), melee and ranged weapons are considered weapons: Every weapon is classified as either melee or ranged. A melee weapon is used to attack a target within 5 feet of you, whereas a ranged weapon is used to attack a target at a distance.


11

You have two questions - why it's like that, and what happens if it wasn't. I'll try to answer both. Favored Enemy through the ages In AD&D, you got your bonus against all sorts of monsters, from goblinoids to kobolds to giants, but not dragons or humans or aberrations. In AD&D 2e, you had to pick a specific creature, but at least you got to pick. ...


10

Yes, that's what it says and that's what it does. If it didn't, it would have no effect at all.


10

The primary source on Favored Enemy is either Player’s Handbook in the ranger class description, or Rules Compendium if you buy its assertion of primacy. The descriptions in the Invisibility description in Dungeon Master’s Guide, Improved Manyshot in Epic Level Handbook, or even darkness, despite also being in the Player’s Handbook, are definitely not the ...


9

Yes, because the damage is "bonus damage." Let's take a look at Colossus Slayer and Hunter's Mark, the ancillary damage-dealers in question: Colossus Slayer: Your tenacity can wear down the most potent foes. When you hit a creature with a weapon attack, the creature takes an extra 1d8 damage if it’s below its hit point maximum. You can deal this ...


9

D&D 5th edition is not a keyword-driven game; quite the opposite: the designers deliberately avoided writing using keywords where possible in favour of describing the rules in what they dubbed “natural language.”* Lacking the word target is therefore not significant. What is significant is if the spell literally doesn't target you, in the normal meaning ...


8

Ranger 20* No, stop, don't leave! Hear me out. On its own, the ranger has a couple tools to make it compete with the main Tier 3s on its own. I am of the personal opinion that the ranger itself, with all options in play, can be considered a fairly good Tier 3, comparable to the bard in its jacking of all trades. The ingredients: (a) Ranger. Naturally. ...


8

Usually, a "damage roll" is considered as "all the dice rolls and damage bonuses that the attack describes". In a simple case, you'd simply do the 1 + 3d4 first and then add the proficiency bonus that corresponds to your level. At first level, that's (1 + 3d4) + 2 . However, in case of resistances, things get a little complicated. If the target is resistant ...


8

You're still proficient in metal armor and may wear it. The negative consequences are: It weakens your druidic connection to nature and thus abilities reliant on it. Your Wild Shape ability can't meld large chunks of metal into your new body, so you can't use it while in metal armor. Your druid is passionate about naturalism — it's literally his ...


8

Your second way. "... by adding together all your levels" would mean that your second example (ranger + paladin)/2 rounded down is how you'd work it. The rule doesn't have you segregate the levels before dividing if they are the same category. The example given in the book is a case of two different categories being combined, otherwise it would not have ...


7

Your DM has the right of it. The way it is worded is designed to make it clear that the player can choose when to apply the benefit. The only limitation is that the player must make the decision to apply the modifier before the DM tells you if it would be a hit/miss or the effect of the damage dealt.


6

From the proficiency section as you pointed out: Druids will not wear armor or use shields made of metal. My interpretation of this statement has always been that it's not that druids can't wear armor, they just won't. So if you choose to wear metal armor, you're choosing not to follow all the tenets that make druids druidic, and thus choosing not to ...


5

Through Ranger's Animal Companion class feature grants him the said companion, he lags behind Druid in its efficiency: This ability functions like the druid ability of the same name, except that the ranger’s effective druid level is one-half his ranger level. A ranger may select from the alternative lists of animal companions just as a druid can, ...


5

The Rules As Written seem pretty clear. "Self" is a range, not a target. The section on Range (PH 202) says that a spell can target a creature, an object, or a point in space. Then it says that some spells "affect only you. These spells have a range of self." Notably, the word "target" is omitted in the description of the range of self. Minor additional ...


4

Option 2 I don’t like much at all. If you are going to attack with simple weapons, Intuitive Attack is the way to go (and then the Strength is largely wasted, even before getting Wild Shape), and if not, well, then you can’t go with Option 2. So that’s out. Option 1 and Option 3 are more competitive. Being able to attack physically prior to Wild Shape is ...


4

Share Spells just changes who the spell affects, not anything else. Share Spells (PHB p. 93): Beginning at 15th level, when you cast a spell targeting yourself, you can also affect your beast companion with the spell if the beast is within 30 feet of you. Nothing changes about the spell's duration or anything else. If it's a spell that requires ...


3

Standard Attack: Correct. As you correctly observe you will only get Dueling damage on your monk weapon strikes. Flurry of Blows: Correct again. Flurry and Hunter's Mark: Not quite. You won't get 1d6 extra damage on your second target. Hunter's Mark only targets one creature. Re-targeting when the original target drops costs a bonus action "on a ...


3

I asked Jeremy Crawford the same question and they clarified the situation with this tweet: A range of self means the caster is the target, as in shield, or the point of origin, as in thunderwave (PH, 202). In your example, spells like Thunderous Smite or Wrathful Smite could be made to also affect the caster's beast companion through the Share ...


3

Rangers can only choose a beast type monster that is no larger than Medium in size and has a Challenge Rating of 1/4 or lower. Page 317, Appendix A of the Monster Manual covers at least 90% of the beasts that have been statted for 5e. Although it's not a comprehensive list of the Ranger's animal companion options, it's really not that hard to sort out what ...


3

Note the quote from the PHB Given this view of things, the druid must be neutral in alignment. That's neutral with a lower case 'n'. When referring to the specific alignment, True Neutral, AD&D usually referred to it with a capital 'N'. The same is usually true for a specific alignment, in that it's capitalized When multiple alignments with "...


3

Just let it do fire damage. As long as you don't allow him to use feats or items to take advantage of his pet doing fire damage, there isn't really any reason to not just make it do fire damage. Having it do fire damage is actually a nerf; while there are monsters with fire vulnerability versus none with vulnerable all, fire resistance is far more common ...


2

As you say, the last paragraph of the ranger's companion text mentions needing 8 hours to magically bond with another non-hostile beast if when the previous one dies. It is probably the same for the first time around. As for how to get the beast I haven't found specific ruling, so it's probably up to the player to find a beast to his liking (any plausible ...



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