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36

The action you described not really a readied action. It's more like a "colorful" Dodge Action. Either dodge or a readied action will cost one action - they are equivalent in game mechanics. If the player wants this to be a readied action, there's no reason to correct them on the term. Disguising the Dodge action as a readied action You can indulge the ...


30

Your example is somewhat flawed. If Bob readies an action to attack Alice as soon as she's within reach, and then moves within reach, it's just a normal move/attack sequence. No Readying is necessary, in which case Alice resolves her readied attack as soon as Bob is within reach and then Bob acts. Let's go with another example. Alice has the best ...


26

You can prepare Dispel Magic to instantly dispel whatever spell a spellcaster casts. However, this will not "counter" their spell, rather, it will dispel it as soon as they cast it. So any spell with a duration of Instantaneous will be unaffected. This will only end the ongoing effects of spells which create ongoing effects. This is not at all the same as "...


26

There's nothing in the Ready action description that would prevent readying Disengage. When you ready an action you: decide what perceivable circumstance will trigger your reaction. Then, you choose the action you will take in response to that trigger, or you choose to move up to your speed in response to it. The perceivable circumstance is that the ...


24

No, you can't do that. Purely mechanical events like "at the end of my turn" or "before your turn" are not legal triggers: Ready […] First, you decide what perceivable circumstance will trigger your reaction. (Player's Basic Rules v0.2, p. 72 / Player's Handbook, p. 193) That means that only things that your character could expect to perceive ...


22

Yes, that's an option, and it's an effective way to coordination the party's actions. The DM would have to make a ruling about what order to resolve all their attacks in, but that's not an issue that would prevent them from all taking the Ready action with the same trigger.


21

Yes you can. The Ready action is what you're looking for. It's explained on p.192 of the player's handbook. First, you decide what perceivable circumstance will trigger your reaction. For you this would be, "If anything nasty comes towards me" Then, you choose the action you will take in response to that trigger, or you choose to move up to your ...


20

The characters provoke opportunity attacks as normal, however the creature who's turn it is does not get an opportunity attack against the readied action A readied actionDDI is an immediate reaction to the triggering action, and so in this case takes places during the creature's turn. Opportunity actions DDI cannot be taken during your own turn.


18

The Ready action includes no restrictions on the number of attacks you can make. You might be thinking of the restriction in the Extra Attack ability: Beginning at 5th level, you can attack twice, instead of once, whenever you take the Attack action on your turn. So a character with Extra Attack can only make a single attack when they Ready the ...


18

Your Turn On your turn, you can move and perform an action. The ready action is, as you point out, an action like any other. This means that on your turn you can move and take the ready action. The Ready Action The ready action allows you to react to a specific, "perceivable circumstance." "To do so, you can take the Ready action on your turn so that you ...


17

It would look like being a 3rd-level Monk (PHB p. 78): Starting at 3rd level, you can use your reaction to deflect or catch the missile when you are hit by a ranged weapon attack… It's just not something that's reasonable or feasible for someone to do without specific training — even top-performing baseball batters can't reliably react usefully to a ...


15

Here's my take on the situation you have described: Readied Actions are meant for use in Initiative Order only. Quote from Wizard's FAQ @ their community forum: On your turn, you spend a standard action to ready an action. You then choose a target (if applicable), a triggering circumstance, and a specific action to ready. When/if the trigger action ...


15

Readied actions last until the start of your next turn, which means yes, they extend into the next round of combat. As per the PHB errata: Ready (p. 193). You have until the start of your next turn to use a readied action. So regardless of whether the cleric has already acted this round, the Readied action would still carry over into the next round and ...


13

You do not lose the power. The standard action to ready gives you the opportunity to make an immediate reaction later on in the turn. You don't lose powers that are never used. Think of readying as converting a power from "standard action" to an "immediate reaction," with the trigger you specified. Some more details: This does burn your immediate action ...


13

Your DM is wrong in your specific case. I'm not sure whether you're saying delaying doesn't end a sustain -- it does -- so I'll cover readying first, then sustaining. Readying is covered on page 247 of the Rules Compendium and page 291 of the Player's Handbook. Your reading is correct. You would have to sustain before you spent your standard action to ready,...


13

In both cases, the PC whose action triggered last goes before the one whose action triggered first. See Ready an Action (Player's Handbook page 291), in particular: Reset Initiative: After you resolve your readied action, move your place in the initiative order to directly before the creature or the event that triggered your readied action.


13

You have cast the spell; you lose the slot. The way readying a spell works is that you cast the spell, and then on a trigger you let it go. Picture an old school Dragon Ball Z battle with the characters charging their powers and then letting them go. When you ready a spell, you cast it as normal but hold its energy, which you release with your reaction ...


12

Until the end of the round. The Ready action specifies in its description that you can only hold your action until later in the round. (PHB, p. 193) The notes about concentration and the breaking thereof are additional to this limit, not a replacement thereof — it specifies that the normal Ready-Reaction timing stays the same when it says you cast [the ...


12

Nothing prevents you from using Ready Action to Disengage... but it's entirely useless. Disengage only prevents attacks of opportunity while you're moving. It does not alter your position with respect to a creature, or prevent the creature from attacking you with it's action. In fact, it's a purely defensive action meant to be taken on the run when you are ...


11

I would not consider that to be a valid trigger. I think the key here is First you decide what perceivable circumstance... (PHB 193) To me, the end of someone's turn is not a perceivable circumstance and you'd need to say "after X character attacks" or something.


11

In previous editions of D&D, players would normally plot out their movement and then the DM would tell them when and if something interrupted that movement. That is not exactly the case in 5E. In 5th edition, everyone has control over their movement unless something is forcing movement. When a character or creature moves, it is feet (spaces) at a time,...


11

A readied action can be prevented and/or disrupted A readied action takes a specific trigger. "I attack if he attacks me", or "I ready an action to attack when Joe the Bard casts a spell". In any case, if that trigger is not met until your next turn, you won't do anything with your readied action. So, if your bard was incapacitated or otherwise made to be ...


10

I was originally thinking it must be "no" to the first part, but after consulting the SRD to back that up, I think that I'll have to go with yes. Emphasis is mine: Readying an Action You can ready a standard action, a move action, or a free action. To do so, specify the action you will take and the conditions under which you will take it. ...


10

An initiative roll seems appropriate for this. With only two people acting, it has a similar feel to a surprise round. However, if I think about it along a more realistic standpoint, the players should be able to synchronize their actions (counting down to when the door gets opened etc.) The goblin is forced to react instead, so would go shortly after. ...


10

So my question would be how is the immobilizing being put onto the target? Is it something that is "until the end of the target's next turn" or "save ends". I personally don't count your turn over with until all of your actions have preformed. Since a readied action moves your place in the initiative order, I treat it just like a delay. The rules for ...


10

This is the general case. Chapter 9 gives rules that tell what you need to do when a encounter requires the characters to resolve their actions within combat. There is nothing that forbids a referee to apply any or all of the combat rules while the characters are exploring a dungeon or moving around. But there is nothing specific either so the referee has ...


10

In order: You can take the Ready action after you use a bonus action, sure. What really matters though is how you get your bonus action. If you just have a feature that lets you take your bonus action without any conditions then you can go ahead and do that. But some bonus actions have conditions that must be met in order for you to take them, like the one ...


10

If the you ignore a trigger, you don't have to ignore subsequent triggers. In the example in the question, the mage can opt not to blast any of the triggering enemies without restricting her ability to blast other triggering enemies later in the round. Looking at the rules, there's nothing that says a character can't react to a trigger after ignoring an ...


9

Readied actions happen when the trigger occurs, interrupting the initiative order. After the readied action takes place the rest of the action takes place as normal. In the case you mention, it is valid for one player to move in response to an enemy attack to give cover, given that he/she had readied the action (or has an ability that allows him to use a ...


8

Going on Hold across multiple rounds When you go on Hold, you are not dealt in for following rounds, and you can take your turn at any point - the value of the card no longer has any meaning. So, in your example, the knight could still attempt to interrupt the vampire even if the vampire was dealt an ace of spades for their initiative. Remember though that ...



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