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19

Yes you can. The Ready action is what you're looking for. It's explained on p.192 of the player's handbook. First, you decide what perceivable circumstance will trigger your reaction. For you this would be, "If anything nasty comes towards me" Then, you choose the action you will take in response to that trigger, or you choose to move up to your ...


5

You can't use Dash. But you can move your speed on your turn, and then move your speed again as part of the readied action. Here's the text: Then, you choose the action you will take in response to that trigger, or you choose to move up to your speed in response to it (Players Basic p72). So, if you move your speed on your turn, and then ready an ...


11

Nothing prevents you from using Ready Action to Disengage... but it's entirely useless. Disengage only prevents attacks of opportunity while you're moving. It does not alter your position with respect to a creature, or prevent the creature from attacking you with it's action. In fact, it's a purely defensive action meant to be taken on the run when you are ...


25

There's nothing in the Ready action description that would prevent readying Disengage. When you ready an action you: decide what perceivable circumstance will trigger your reaction. Then, you choose the action you will take in response to that trigger, or you choose to move up to your speed in response to it. The perceivable circumstance is that the ...


11

In previous editions of D&D, players would normally plot out their movement and then the DM would tell them when and if something interrupted that movement. That is not exactly the case in 5E. In 5th edition, everyone has control over their movement unless something is forcing movement. When a character or creature moves, it is feet (spaces) at a ...


4

There is no surprise round in D&D 5, there is only a surprised creature! Therefore, I don't think your question makes sense. Assuming the hasted rogue (HR) is not surprised and the surprised victim (SV) is, the first thing that happens is that they each roll for initiative. There are 2 possible outcomes: SV beats HR SV takes their turn, being ...


3

This will depend on your DM According to the text for a readied action: Sometimes you want to get the jump on a foe or wait for a particular circumstance before you act. To do so, you can take the Ready action on your turn so that you can act later in the round using your reaction. First, you decide what perceivable circumstance will trigger ...


0

The Ready action makes no mention of rounds (PHB Errata p.193): You have until the start of your next turn to use a readied action. That is you can use the readied action any time between now and your next turn: somewhere in that period the cleric is bound to have a turn and could use it to cure him triggering the readied action. Or he might not and ...


14

Readied actions last until the start of your next turn, which means yes, they extend into the next round of combat. As per the PHB errata: Ready (p. 193). You have until the start of your next turn to use a readied action. So regardless of whether the cleric has already acted this round, the Readied action would still carry over into the next round and ...


2

When you Ready an action, the text says it is used as a Reaction later in the round. This does not mean that the Readied action is lost at the lowest initiative value though. Rather, the action is not wasted unless their next turn comes up a full round later. The Player's Handbook Errata makes specific mention of the Ready action, specifying that "you have ...


3

Is it permissible for the player to opt for the second timing? No, because you're asking for finer resolution than 5e really provides. Casting a spell is an action. Whichever action your readier chooses is an action. In 5e's action economy actions take the time of (1 action), and it's parsed no finer than that. To opt for the second timing is to argue ...



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