Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

47

Some quick searches show me that the internet is full of historical accounts, movies, TV-shows, and stories about kings, rulers, and other such nobility and what they do during their day. I am sure you are aware of this as well, so I understand that you want an answer in the context of a role playing game. The King can do whatever he wants Regardless of ...


32

From the ever-essential Medieval Demographics Made Easy, I find that: A square mile of settled land (including requisite roads, villages and towns, as well as crops and pastureland) will support 180 people. This takes into account normal blights, rats, drought, and theft, all of which are common in most worlds. From Medieval Manors I learn that a ...


13

Being something of an economics wonk, I've found it easiest to back out of RPG-space by doing some rough conversions of the currencies moving around and the value of goods, and then build a coherent economic system without a lot of detail - basically writing an economy at the narrative scale. When it's time to move back into the game world, at whatever ...


12

Once a henchman is given a domain, they're no longer a henchman, they're a vassal. Think about it this way. Ser John the Great gives his loyal spear-carrier Walden a title over the Barony of Thicke. Lord Walden of Thicke becomes a peer of another Baron who was never Ser John's henchman, Baron Gwynedd. Baron Gwynedd has income, land, peasants, and all kinds ...


11

See Realm Management Rules That Work and What rpgs are focused on kingdom building and what sort of mechanics are used in each system? for a variety of kingdom building rulesets you can crib for your game. Like, you could graft the REIGN kingdom system on top if you were willing to do some work. Some of those answers also mention 3.5e supplements and ...


11

First and Foremost the King needs to remain king... As you note you could as king effectively delegate ALL of your responsibilities away leaving you endless leisure time. Beyond the moral or philosophical issues with that scenario there is the very real political and personal danger this engenders. If everyone sees the kingdom running swell without the ...


8

I imagine that renaissance and medieval RPGs will be somewhat different. That said, a quick search turned up an essay on pre-industrial economics in RPGs, which may help you with some rough numbers: The major limiting factor in a Medieval/pre-industrial society is the extreme fragility of the urban concentrations that provide what limited amounts of ...


8

I would suggest Reign based on the One Roll Engine. It's a great tool for running encounters on a macro scale. Thanks to rjstreet for introducing me to it. The core rules, including the best of the supplements and excluding the setting can be had in the Reign Enchiridion


7

King Arthur Pendragon has at least two good sets. Yes, plural. Noble's Book, for 1st edition, is relatively straightforward tracks resources by type, and produces excellent landholdings for smaller-end games; it tends to break a bit at the county level. Lordly Domains is for 3rd/4th Edition abstracts much of the details, alters the upkeep costs for ...


7

There are two ways to approach a "kingdom building" campaign. One is from the political side, and the other is from the build-and-supply side. The former focuses on social maneuvering and only touches lightly on logistics. The latter focuses on logistics and only touches lightly on social maneuvering. If you're looking to run a dramatic political campaign, ...


7

Interesting question. I can't come up with a really good solution, but here is an unorthodox idea on how to tackle this: How about using a strategy computer game to model the progress of the city? This does provide some level of abstraction (a rather strong abstraction with some games), but it would give you: resource requirements time requirements ...


7

He holds the highest ranking job of the feudal system, which means it is his responsibility to protect his entire kingdom - he answers to no one, but should he fail to protect his land, he could face anything from a revolution to complete obliteration by another king. Which means, the two biggest things that preoccupy a King's time are: His People Other ...


6

You could take a look at Reign. [Give] the PCs the fun and interesting parts of governance — tough decisions, leadership, real ‘buck stops here’ stuff — while hand waving all the plodding and dull everyday routine of tax levels and administrivia. —Reign Q&A. It's designed to plug into existing RPGs.


6

I just found GURPS Low-Tech Companion 3: Daily Life and Economics. The publisher's blurb says: Butcher, Baker, Candlestick-Maker Society is built on the backs of people who gather resources and turn them into food, shelter, and finished goods. Low-Tech Companion 3: Daily Life and Economics looks at the lot of ordinary TL0-4 folk – much of which is ...


6

Sorry, it took me a bit to finish reading Ultimate Campaign. All right, a comparison of the kingdom building rules in "Of Cities and Kings" from Rivers Run Red, the second issue of the Kingmaker Pathfinder Adventure Path, and the kingdom building rules from the Pathfinder RPG hardback Ultimate Campaign. They are basically the same rules, slightly expanded. ...


5

I would like to add S. John Ross's Medieval Demographics Made Easy to this list. It's not really a set of mechanics, but it is a terrific collection of information that might be incorporated into a set of mechanics.


5

In response to the question of "What defines good rules" as far as the Song of Ice and Fire RPG... (And I assume that the particulars of the setting are unimportant for the sake of the question, as while it is important to how things function, it's outside the scope of the basic question.) In the game, the characters are assumed to be part of a noble house ...


5

For me, there are 2 main ways to look at this. The first one is to look at his/her relationship with her citizens while the other is about the relationships with other realms. Inside thy realm The main idea here is that there will be always someone (or some-group) who are not very happy with the ruler. Some of the problems they'll present will be left for ...


5

If you're looking for a lot of little things that come up for a ruler, I recommend poaching from a modern political drama. You'll have to re-skin the details, but shockingly little is really different about how we govern countries today versus how they were run hundreds or thousands of years ago. My immediate suggestion is to rob from the summaries of a ...


4

Mongoose Runequest 2 recently released its Empires supplement. It's a percentile system derived from BRP that draws up a list for each political entity very similar to a character profile. Characters can control factions, guilds, and a whole range of political systems from villages to empires (you can also play polities that are nested within another, like a ...


4

Greg Stolze's Reign has a lot of emphasis on this, and may be the single best choice. Green Ronin's Song of Ice and Fire RPG has extensive and very good rules on building and running a noble house. Slightly more specific, but definitely in the same family. Lastly, Empires was a d20 supplement that basically brought birthright rules into 3e. Brief ...


4

Reign, as mentioned by others, uses the "One Roll Engine"... you'll need a bunch of D10's, and the interpretation of rolls is odd on it. More flexible than birthright. John Wick's Houses of the Blooded also covers building large domains within the setting, and could easily do it much like Birthright, but with a MUCH more narrative scale. Blood and Honor is ...


4

The Tao of D&D has actually created a complete economic framework for AD&D. And he describes how to calculate the production of goods in each twenty mile hex on a world map and how to roughly appreciate them over distances. This certainly isn't easy but it is quite complete.


4

Vasals probably do not get paid a fee. It doesn't say this, but does say they pay the liege. Note that the example on page 146 does not show Vassals as an expense, only as income. However, also note that the GP Threshold is almost always higher than the fee for the current level. If the character levels up, he's below the cap, and perhaps below his fee, ...


4

There are two resources I can think of that might be useful: The Kingmaker adventure path for Pathfinder contains some very basic management and realm building mechanics (in the second part of the module) which include realm stability, income, building up different aspects/buildings in a city and what the city needs. I'm playing the Kingmaker adventure path ...


4

I'd be very tempted to adapt the Ultimate Campaign mechanics for Pathfinder to 3.5, the management aspects of that are nicely abstracted and 3.5 isn't a stones throw away from Pathfinder enough that it should fit. Also this is all now online for free here: Kingdom Building. I've been in the Kingmaker campaign for PF for over a year now and the rules for ...


4

Adventurer Conqueror King address many of the same topics as Paizo's Kingmaker. Also the treasure generation system has been aligned with economic assumptions of the domain system. The rules address mercantile ventures, and building not only of castles but other types of holdings. The different elements are defined in natural terms of gold pieces, days of ...


3

I haven't heard of an existing system for this, but I think you could fairly easily translate character-building into nation-building. For example, replace Strength, Dexterity, Wisdom, Intellect, Charisma, and Fortitude with major nation traits, such as Military, Science, Economy, Magic, Diplomacy, and something like land defensibility. You could then ...


3

The rule of thumb I've absorbed from my history readings has been 90%: nine farmers for every noblemen, nine for every priest, nine for every knight, nine for every merchant. And that's generous; in marginal land the fraction of specialists in the population could be 1% or even less. According to this site, the U.S. population was still 90% farming as late ...


3

The Pursuit of Glory: Europe 1648-1815 by Tim Blanning has a mine of information about renaissance society from travel, sex life, marriage, industry, agriculture and many more. While it is a scholar book, it is accessible and a must read if you are interested in the time period. Depending on when you pre-modern setting is, I would get a copy and read it. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible