Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

The Wall of the Faithless was not actually made by Kelemvor, it was made by Myrkul. I am not 100% certain how canon Neverwinter Nights 2 is for Forgotton Realms lore, but in that game, Myrkul claims he had constructed the Wall to dispose of unclaimed, faithless souls. However, there could be multiple other reasons for him to do this. For starters, it is ...


13

I can make things up on the fly based on his dogma, but that would hardly be quoting, would it? Actually, it would be quoting. Your character can't make up scripture and call it a quote, but you can. You, as the player, have agency to add material to the world you are playing in. How much of the world you can edit is dependent upon your game's ...


12

Alright, this is going to delve into both canon and conjecture, as it must for such a nebulous topic. I'll break them down so we know which is which. The Many Gods of the Dead As has been noted (correctly), the Wall of the Faithless was established by Myrkul. His successor Cyric kept the Wall erected largely out of malice and sadism, never questioning its ...


9

In 3.5e The only gear gods have listed in their possessions line in the 3.5e Deities and Demigods is zero or one iconic items, often a weapon but sometimes something else (like the crown of Thoth) that is either an artifact or a real powerful mash-up item. The rest of gear doesn't matter, and you'll note stat lines are pretty full of "+12 divine" or whatnot ...


7

It's tempting to see this as, finally, confirmation that Paladine is Bahamut. But that temptation is deceptive. The trouble with citing 5e for Tiamat = Takhisis is that every detail about the gods and planes in 5e is presented as "here's some stuff! DM, it's up to you to decide what's true in your setting." So, as far as establishing setting canon, 5e is ...


6

There are many factors depending on the setting. Although there is lore common to many D&D settings, even that lore is subject to change—possibly radically so—in any given campaign or setting. When it comes to settings DMs make themselves, that is doubly true. In this case, there may be precedents set by other campaigns and other settings, but there is ...


5

Don't worry about gear. If your players have a confident plan to attack a god, it almost certainly won't come down to gear that the god has. Instead, figure out the style of his/her gear and go from there. 20th level npc wealth by level in pathfinder is 159kgp. Pulling random links from the internet, we have 11mgp at 35th level. Short version: "anything a ...


5

Unless your god is one of poverty, this is irrelevant. A god is more than a being with 40 class levels. They have a divine spark, power beyond even the most potent of mortals. They can do things that draw awe and reverance from the common folk, and gain power from this in return. It is why they are gods. They can draw upon forces, allies and resources worth ...


3

From what I have read, there are only two ways to truly kill a D&D deity. There is a common theme within the Sundering novels, that deities long thought dead, were in fact, not dead. Remove all faith in the deity. That is, if a god is forgotten and has no followers, they become a dead god in the astral sea. DMG on page 46-47 Visitors occasionally ...


3

There isn't a one-size-fits-all answer. A very good starting point without doing tons of research into Gazetteers, Dragon Magazine, and other such publications, would be page 5 of Complete Champion: The D&D Churches. But even this is very limited, since Greyhawk, specifically, (not Greyhawk: Core) has WAY MORE deities than those in the Player's ...


2

Your logic is backwards. The statement: Takhisis (Tiamat's name on Krynn) is intended to support play on Krynn, as the dragon orbs are almost certainly going to show up in any high level game there. As campaign-world jumping campaigns exist at the whim of the DM, it's absolutely and positively the DM's call. Given that (at least in earlier ages) ...


2

What does the alignment rule mean if you have no deity? It means absolutely nothing to you, it will only affect which spells you can cast, as you cannot cast spells of an opposed aligment. I am currently Chaotic Good; would that mean that I cannot become Neutral Good because I don't have a god to give me an axis? No, you could become Neutral ...


1

A deity-less Cleric lacks the Cleric's normal alignment restriction. He still can't cast spells with an opposed alignment descriptor or choose an alignment domain without that alignment. Just as a real Cleric can change alignment with impunity, so long as he remains within one step of his deity, so can your deity-less Cleric but to any alignment he feels ...


1

There isn't really anything written on this for 5e yet. However, you might find some inspiration in the 3.5e Forgotten Realms book Faiths and Pantheons. That book does provide stat blocks for the gods, and they are killable, though usually it is another god that kills a god. In the 5e world, gods would certainly have Legendary Actions as described in MM ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible