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28

There is no mechanical or fluff requirement for a Paladin to follow a god. You've quoted the most relevant paragraph yourself, but for a backup, from the same page: Whether sworn before a god's altar and the witness of a priest, in a sacred glade before nature spirits and fey beings, or in a moment of desperation and grief with the dead as the only ...


24

I can make things up on the fly based on his dogma, but that would hardly be quoting, would it? Actually, it would be quoting. Your character can't make up scripture and call it a quote, but you can. You, as the player, have agency to add material to the world you are playing in. How much of the world you can edit is dependent upon your game's ...


23

(Background: I am also a Christian, along with several of the people in my gaming group.) tl;dr -- The fictional god of your fictional world is not the God of our universe. Make the fictional god clearly distinct from our God. Figure out how much of what the party knows about that god is true. Define what you mean by "God" in your game world. Your game ...


16

The Wall of the Faithless was not actually made by Kelemvor, it was made by Myrkul. I am not 100% certain how canon Neverwinter Nights 2 is for Forgotton Realms lore, but in that game, Myrkul claims he had constructed the Wall to dispose of unclaimed, faithless souls. However, there could be multiple other reasons for him to do this. For starters, it is ...


12

According to the wiki entry for Kanchelsis, deity for vampirism, there is an alternate creation myth that attributes the myth to an article entitled "Core Beliefs: Pelor" by Sean K. Reynolds, appearing in Dragon magazine #346. It's not much, but I've found the text for "Punishment of the Undead" which describes the myth and redemption (Note: For citation ...


12

Alright, this is going to delve into both canon and conjecture, as it must for such a nebulous topic. I'll break them down so we know which is which. The Many Gods of the Dead As has been noted (correctly), the Wall of the Faithless was established by Myrkul. His successor Cyric kept the Wall erected largely out of malice and sadism, never questioning its ...


10

Sure. 4e really doesn't care. Matters of deities and alignments are really left entirely up to the DM. Talk to your DM about this and he may develop some narrative consequences to the change, however, there are no mechanical means nor consequences to make the change. Also, as Oblivious Sage points out, you can totally change your alignment without changing ...


9

In 3.5e The only gear gods have listed in their possessions line in the 3.5e Deities and Demigods is zero or one iconic items, often a weapon but sometimes something else (like the crown of Thoth) that is either an artifact or a real powerful mash-up item. The rest of gear doesn't matter, and you'll note stat lines are pretty full of "+12 divine" or whatnot ...


8

God is a being central to all creation, whose will, mind, and power are absolute and unrivalled, and yet so subtle that His existence and intentions are subject to doubt. Use that to your advantage: Be vague. Your players are dealing with an incomprehensibly complex being; They can't really expect to understand the true depths of His psychology. That ...


7

It's tempting to see this as, finally, confirmation that Paladine is Bahamut. But that temptation is deceptive. The trouble with citing 5e for Tiamat = Takhisis is that every detail about the gods and planes in 5e is presented as "here's some stuff! DM, it's up to you to decide what's true in your setting." So, as far as establishing setting canon, 5e is ...


7

Adventurer Conqueror King System is also substantially focused on this kind of thing. You might look there for inspiration or consider switching over. Obviously, something to talk to your GM/Judge about. Here's the company link. http://www.autarch.co/ Ultimate Campaign is a pathfinder product designed for that purpose. To boot, the rules are nicely ...


7

Yes, the old deities are really coming back. Along with the list of old deities in the Forgotten Realms section of the gods listed in the updated basic rules, (and the gods listed amongst many pantheons in the Player's Handbook) there is also the "Sundering" story line. The Player's handbook lists 39 divine for the Forgotten Realms setting with their domains ...


6

Unfortunately Not The extraordinary ability rage granted by the prestige class eye of Gruumsh says An eye of Gruumsh can fly into a rage just as a barbarian can, with all the same benefits and drawbacks (see page 25 of the Player’s Handbook). An eye of Gruumsh’s class levels stack with his barbarian levels (if any) for determining the number of times ...


6

Dugmaren Brightmantle seems like a good candidate. From the Wikipedia page: Dugmaren Brightmantle is the dwarf deity of scholarship, discovery, and invention. Dugmaren shares the Dwarven Mountain on the Outlands with Dumathoin and Vergadain. Dugmaren appears as an elderly dwarf with sparkling blue eyes. His domain isn't strictly light, but those ...


6

There are many factors depending on the setting. Although there is lore common to many D&D settings, even that lore is subject to change—possibly radically so—in any given campaign or setting. When it comes to settings DMs make themselves, that is doubly true. In this case, there may be precedents set by other campaigns and other settings, but there is ...


5

Don't worry about gear. If your players have a confident plan to attack a god, it almost certainly won't come down to gear that the god has. Instead, figure out the style of his/her gear and go from there. 20th level npc wealth by level in pathfinder is 159kgp. Pulling random links from the internet, we have 11mgp at 35th level. Short version: "anything a ...


5

Unless your god is one of poverty, this is irrelevant. A god is more than a being with 40 class levels. They have a divine spark, power beyond even the most potent of mortals. They can do things that draw awe and reverance from the common folk, and gain power from this in return. It is why they are gods. They can draw upon forces, allies and resources worth ...


5

The three deities you reference (Bhaal, Myrkul, and Leira) are listed in Appendix B of the 5E Players Handbook (p. 294).


5

This is not intended to be a full answer, more like an addendum to the others that give you more specific advice. Nonetheless, I think this is as crucial as anything else here: Consult your DM. Always. You're not going to play in the official Forgotten Realms in the strictest sense of the expression. Only devs and writers working for Wizards do that. ...


5

There is no official word on the Forgotten Realms lesser deity Shaundakul in 5e. He has not been mentioned in Realms materials since 3e, but has never been confirmed as dead. As far as Shaundakul in 5e, the closest to an official word is probably Realms author Erik Scott de Bie's long-running (nearly 3 years now) two-part thread, "One Canon, One Story, One ...


5

Avandra is new. Erathis is new. Ioun is new, but the name seems to derive from ioun stones, which have been around since at least AD&D. Melora is new. The Raven Queen is new (although the idea of a mortal taking over the portfolio of God of the Dead is not new — see Kelemvor in 2E for just one example). Torog is new. Zehir is new, but the Neverwinter ...


5

It's not always the best choice. Depending on what your measure of "best" is, it may actually be a worse choice. Pick specialty priest when you feel like the unique abilities are especially neat and that's what you want to play. In particular, there's no attempt at balance in the specialty priest options, so if that is part of one's measure of "best" then ...


4

Don't represent God directly. My recommendation is that to avoid violating players' external expectations of God you should use custom characters that represent His interests and work as His hands, rather than Himself directly. And this should make sense to your players. This is the reason why there are archangels, saints, The Pope, the pastor of your ...


4

The World Serpent is directly borrowed from real-world Norse mythology, in which the World Serpent Jörmungandr encircles the world and is destined to end it. The Serpent Kingdoms is a Forgotten Realms book, and like most Realms mythology, liberally borrowing from real-world mythology is a deliberate world-building choice to imply that our real world and the ...


4

Print(-ish) Well, your best bet is to read one of the Greyhawk sourcebooks that covers their deities. The Living Greyhawk Gazetteer is the most recent, but the original World of Greyhawk setting boxed set just became available in PDF from dndclassics.com. The later From The Ashes boxed set, the Greyhawk Adventures hardback, and the Player's Guide to ...


4

What does the alignment rule mean if you have no deity? It means absolutely nothing to you, it will only affect which spells you can cast, as you cannot cast spells of an opposed aligment. I am currently Chaotic Good; would that mean that I cannot become Neutral Good because I don't have a god to give me an axis? No, you could become Neutral ...


3

From what I have read, there are only two ways to truly kill a D&D deity. There is a common theme within the Sundering novels, that deities long thought dead, were in fact, not dead. Remove all faith in the deity. That is, if a god is forgotten and has no followers, they become a dead god in the astral sea. DMG on page 46-47 Visitors occasionally ...


3

Yes, Ultimate Campaign has support for building organizations out of "teams". See the Downtime rules on the d20PFSRD - it's harder to follow than reading the book, but the rules parts are all there: http://www.d20pfsrd.com/gamemastering/other-rules/downtime


3

No, but the Dead Three are still around Several gods died during the Time of Troubles, notably including the Dead Three: Bane, god of tyranny, Bhaal, god of murder, and Myrkul, god of death. However, gods are difficult to destroy in the Forgotten Realms, and all three of the dead gods have devised schemes to return to power. Bane’s plot was successful, and ...


3

One would think any good (and frankly even many Neutral) gods would have a place for opposition of black magic and foul sorcery. That's kinda like saying "who doesn't like murderers?" "Anyone but Norgorberites I guess?" is the answer. Even CN churches won't like it if there's enslaving/domination going on from the baddies. Good type gods that are the most ...



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