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55

Short answer: Yes Christian and Christian-themed elements, in the very early years of Dragon Magazine, did in fact get some coverage. An article called The Politics of Hell in Dragon 28 (warning that it "cannot be considered the official doctrine of" AD&D) presented a history of Hell's struggle against God as played out on an interpretation of modern ...


24

I can make things up on the fly based on his dogma, but that would hardly be quoting, would it? Actually, it would be quoting. Your character can't make up scripture and call it a quote, but you can. You, as the player, have agency to add material to the world you are playing in. How much of the world you can edit is dependent upon your game's ...


17

I can not say if there is any canon about the specific combination of gnoll and cleric of Erythnul. However, a Pathfinder third party publisher has a large page regarding gnolls, where they state the following (emphasis mine): Gnolls treat their dead like they would any other dead creature and engage in cannibalism, but they may offer a brief ceremony ...


17

TSR faced several concerns in its early age, with AD&D having strong opponents linking roleplay to suicidal tendencies, satanism, and worse. As a consequence, TSR was very cautious regarding their image about religion. As an example, the original Deities & Demigods was renamed Legend & Lore in later editions. This taboo is probably way less of a ...


16

Alright, this is going to delve into both canon and conjecture, as it must for such a nebulous topic. I'll break them down so we know which is which. The Many Gods of the Dead As has been noted (correctly), the Wall of the Faithless was established by Myrkul. His successor Cyric kept the Wall erected largely out of malice and sadism, never questioning its ...


16

The Wall of the Faithless was not actually made by Kelemvor, it was made by Myrkul. I am not 100% certain how canon Neverwinter Nights 2 is for Forgotton Realms lore, but in that game, Myrkul claims he had constructed the Wall to dispose of unclaimed, faithless souls. However, there could be multiple other reasons for him to do this. For starters, it is ...


15

Ask your DM: Describe the assistance you seek […] The DM chooses the nature of the intervention (PHB, p. 59) That is all you or I know about this. We can't tell you what form it will or can take, because the literal rule is that the DM gets to make something up that seems appropriate to the exact situation and your specific request at the time. Whether ...


14

While the New Testament has, I think, been untouched even by third-party publishers, Green Ronin's Mythic Vistas series at one point included... Testament It's billed as d20 role-playing in the biblical era and focuses on the Old Testament. Reviews of it are on RPGNet, Drive-thru RPG, and this guy's blog. One of Wargame Vault's customer reviews lauds ...


13

My question: Is this possible? Yes, it's possible, whether or not the fiend and the god/goddess get along. There is no RAW prohibition from the multiclass, no matter how awkward it looks. From a purely RAW standpoint, I don't think that Warlocks can lose their powers, but would his good deity even bother with someone who sold their soul to a ...


12

There are many factors depending on the setting. Although there is lore common to many D&D settings, even that lore is subject to change—possibly radically so—in any given campaign or setting. When it comes to settings DMs make themselves, that is doubly true. In this case, there may be precedents set by other campaigns and other settings, but there is ...


12

Was going to be a comment since it’s a fairly weak answer, but too long for that, and ultimately it does have an answer to the title question. Lucifer, under that name, definitely does appear in D&D, that much I know – but they pretty quickly got rid of him to avoid offending anyone, and because of the whole D&D-satanism hysteria. There was also a ...


12

In all my reading of Realms material over the years, I've never seen the “Roman” approach to other pantheons practiced or even referenced. Other pantheons are generally acknowledged as real, just foreign—a natural effect of living in a world where the individual gods regularly and undeniably manifest in person. Instead, what you tend to see mentioned while ...


10

In 3.5e The only gear gods have listed in their possessions line in the 3.5e Deities and Demigods is zero or one iconic items, often a weapon but sometimes something else (like the crown of Thoth) that is either an artifact or a real powerful mash-up item. The rest of gear doesn't matter, and you'll note stat lines are pretty full of "+12 divine" or whatnot ...


10

Yay, I get to dust off some old books! Third and Second edition sources The AD&D 2nd edition Faiths and Avatars supplement covers Kelemvor in detail. I'll be quoting from his entry from the more recent 3rd Edition Forgotten Realms book Faiths and Pantheons. It says this about him: Cleric Alignments: LE, LG, LN ... Kelemvor urges his clerics to ...


9

From what I have read, there are only two ways to truly kill a D&D deity. There is a common theme within the Sundering novels, that deities long thought dead, were in fact, not dead. Remove all faith in the deity. That is, if a god is forgotten and has no followers, they become a dead god in the astral sea. DMG on page 46-47 Visitors occasionally ...


9

Assuming you want to show respect for your fallen companion, I would suggest taking inspiration from the gnolls in Digger. When one of the pack members is killed, a ceremony is held in her honor after she is avenged, in which her body is eaten by the tribe to ensure her strength returns to them. The hunter motifs and strong group-unity marred by constant ...


9

The two most thorough compendiums of deity and domain information are imarvintpa’s Deity Search and Curmudgeon’s Cleric Domain List. Neither lists anything with “xv” or “iya.” This strongly suggests that the god is never defined in 3rd edition, as both sources are extremely comprehensive. On the off-chance that either had skipped web material, I also ...


9

I'm not a lawyer or giving legal advice on a course of action, only explaining my understanding of relevant law and licensing. There are two things here: copyright and licensing. They cannot be mixed up if you want a clear picture of what's permitted. Because each use completely different rules, they can have different, even opposite answers! Therefore you ...


8

Some common “spider” tropes to consider, based on various attributes of spiders; many of these can be played up and portrayed in a positive light. Web Weaving Probably the most noted characteristic of spiders is their (mostly) unique ability to spin webs. Spider silk is tremendously strong for its weight (to the point that modern attempts have been made to ...


8

The Forgotten Realms wiki article on Duin is reasonably extensive and sources several sourcebooks its information is drawn from. Probably the most extensive writeup is the 3 1/2 page one in Demihuman Deities (1998). As for all the gods - start on the wiki, the Realms has spat out hundreds of pages of sourcebook on any topic imaginable. Just in my 2e ...


7

It's tempting to see this as, finally, confirmation that Paladine is Bahamut. But that temptation is deceptive. The trouble with citing 5e for Tiamat = Takhisis is that every detail about the gods and planes in 5e is presented as "here's some stuff! DM, it's up to you to decide what's true in your setting." So, as far as establishing setting canon, 5e is ...


6

Tough question, but overall I'd say that the 'kill all the evil guys, becuase they are evil' philosophy may cause consequences for the paladin of Iomedae, especially if for example the evil individual surrendered or is a non-combatant. After all (in my experience), the paladin who see evil everywhere and smites without abandon is often a villain for the ...


6

Powerful devils like Asmodeus have never been mere 'pit fiends'. Indeed, none of the Archdevils nor their Demon Lord counterparts could possibly be mapped to anything in the 5e MM. If you absolutely must have statistics, you'll have to create them yourself at this point. We aren't completely in the dark on how to do it. Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide ...


5

I think this problem lies not in the creation and attributes of the spider god, but rather how his players are going to interact with this world the DM has set up. Teach them through experience Your players need to understand first-hand that this world is different from the DnD they know (or perhaps that even their characters know [please let me know if ...


5

Let's take Tuaregs as a real-life example. Let's say your elves have a pastoralist lifestyle. I'm thinking cashemere goats for example. Your goddess is normally depicted as a beautiful (beuty is generally percieved as good) elven woman (or maiden, also a good sign) with four arms and four legs, clever players may notice that eight is the number of legs of ...


5

Good question! Gozreh is said to dwell "at the horizon, where the sea meets the sky" (Gods and Magic, 18). As a result pathfinderwiki.com lists his/her home as the Material Plane. In his/her more full article in Pathfinder #38, Racing to Ruin, it only notes "Many cloud and storm giants are native to her planar realm," hinting that there is one, but this is ...


5

It's not always the best choice. Depending on what your measure of "best" is, it may actually be a worse choice. Pick specialty priest when you feel like the unique abilities are especially neat and that's what you want to play. In particular, there's no attempt at balance in the specialty priest options, so if that is part of one's measure of "best" then ...


5

Avandra is new. Erathis is new. Ioun is new, but the name seems to derive from ioun stones, which have been around since at least AD&D. Melora is new. The Raven Queen is new (although the idea of a mortal taking over the portfolio of God of the Dead is not new — see Kelemvor in 2E for just one example). Torog is new. Zehir is new, but the Neverwinter ...


5

Don't worry about gear. If your players have a confident plan to attack a god, it almost certainly won't come down to gear that the god has. Instead, figure out the style of his/her gear and go from there. 20th level npc wealth by level in pathfinder is 159kgp. Pulling random links from the internet, we have 11mgp at 35th level. Short version: "anything a ...


5

Unless your god is one of poverty, this is irrelevant. A god is more than a being with 40 class levels. They have a divine spark, power beyond even the most potent of mortals. They can do things that draw awe and reverance from the common folk, and gain power from this in return. It is why they are gods. They can draw upon forces, allies and resources worth ...



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