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28

There is no mechanical or fluff requirement for a Paladin to follow a god. You've quoted the most relevant paragraph yourself, but for a backup, from the same page: Whether sworn before a god's altar and the witness of a priest, in a sacred glade before nature spirits and fey beings, or in a moment of desperation and grief with the dead as the only ...


23

(Background: I am also a Christian, along with several of the people in my gaming group.) tl;dr -- The fictional god of your fictional world is not the God of our universe. Make the fictional god clearly distinct from our God. Figure out how much of what the party knows about that god is true. Define what you mean by "God" in your game world. Your game ...


12

According to the wiki entry for Kanchelsis, deity for vampirism, there is an alternate creation myth that attributes the myth to an article entitled "Core Beliefs: Pelor" by Sean K. Reynolds, appearing in Dragon magazine #346. It's not much, but I've found the text for "Punishment of the Undead" which describes the myth and redemption (Note: For citation ...


10

Sure. 4e really doesn't care. Matters of deities and alignments are really left entirely up to the DM. Talk to your DM about this and he may develop some narrative consequences to the change, however, there are no mechanical means nor consequences to make the change. Also, as Oblivious Sage points out, you can totally change your alignment without changing ...


10

Nerull was a jerk who wanted to be king of the gods. The other deities were happy when the Raven Queen croaked him—happy enough to raise her to godhood in his place—but didn't want a repeat performance. So they tweaked her portfolio a little, and she later added a couple extra domains of her own. To prevent her from becoming a tyrant in the ...


8

God is a being central to all creation, whose will, mind, and power are absolute and unrivalled, and yet so subtle that His existence and intentions are subject to doubt. Use that to your advantage: Be vague. Your players are dealing with an incomprehensibly complex being; They can't really expect to understand the true depths of His psychology. That ...


8

Religion Does Provide A Better Life Priests of the Sovereign Host often provide their services to the people, and attribute positive phenomena to the good gods of the pantheon. While there's no outright proof that the gods interfere in the world or even that they exist at all, their priests do still wield divine magic, and that's gotta account for ...


7

Adventurer Conqueror King System is also substantially focused on this kind of thing. You might look there for inspiration or consider switching over. Obviously, something to talk to your GM/Judge about. Here's the company link. http://www.autarch.co/ Ultimate Campaign is a pathfinder product designed for that purpose. To boot, the rules are nicely ...


6

Dugmaren Brightmantle seems like a good candidate. From the Wikipedia page: Dugmaren Brightmantle is the dwarf deity of scholarship, discovery, and invention. Dugmaren shares the Dwarven Mountain on the Outlands with Dumathoin and Vergadain. Dugmaren appears as an elderly dwarf with sparkling blue eyes. His domain isn't strictly light, but those ...


6

Unfortunately Not The extraordinary ability rage granted by the prestige class eye of Gruumsh says An eye of Gruumsh can fly into a rage just as a barbarian can, with all the same benefits and drawbacks (see page 25 of the Player’s Handbook). An eye of Gruumsh’s class levels stack with his barbarian levels (if any) for determining the number of times ...


6

I'm only familiar with the 4E version of Eberron, and the one book I read, The City of Towers. It sounds to me like you're talking primarily about the Sovereign Host religion, so that's where I'll focus my answer. Religion Can Improve Your Life I'm not sure why you say that 'the gods are silent'. I don't recall reading anything anywhere that gave me that ...


6

According to the Wikipedia entry, they celebrate and perform rituals in the following manner: Rituals Hextorian services feature chanting, wind instruments sounding discordant notes, shouts and screams, and iron weapons striking against solid objects. Hextorians swear mighty oaths in battle, such as "Strength in victory!" "Mercy is for ...


6

By RAW, you can cast Flame Strike all you want. This kind of restriction is technically a roleplaying thing. By the rules, there is nothing to prevent you from casting Flame Strike as a cleric of Auril. The only restrictions on what spells a cleric can cast based on his chosen deity are alignment-based, not based on energy types. However, you're likely ...


6

Nerull trapped and tormented souls in Pluton (a domain of the Astral Sea in the Points of Light setting), plotting to become the king of the gods... until his mortal consort killed him and acquired his portfolio. [She was] a haughty mortal sorcerer-queen whose death brought her into Nerull’s realm. The Lord of the Dead sought to bind her to him as his ...


5

There's no connection. Deities and Demigods has a vague suggestion in the footnote on page 26: Most deities are 20 HD outsiders with 30 to 50 character levels as well. And that's it. Just add as many class levels as you feel necessary to represent the "mortal" abilities of the deity.


5

The three deities you reference (Bhaal, Myrkul, and Leira) are listed in Appendix B of the 5E Players Handbook (p. 294).


5

This is not intended to be a full answer, more like an addendum to the others that give you more specific advice. Nonetheless, I think this is as crucial as anything else here: Consult your DM. Always. You're not going to play in the official Forgotten Realms in the strictest sense of the expression. Only devs and writers working for Wizards do that. ...


5

There is no official word on the Forgotten Realms lesser deity Shaundakul in 5e. He has not been mentioned in Realms materials since 3e, but has never been confirmed as dead. As far as Shaundakul in 5e, the closest to an official word is probably Realms author Erik Scott de Bie's long-running (nearly 3 years now) two-part thread, "One Canon, One Story, One ...


4

Don't represent God directly. My recommendation is that to avoid violating players' external expectations of God you should use custom characters that represent His interests and work as His hands, rather than Himself directly. And this should make sense to your players. This is the reason why there are archangels, saints, The Pope, the pastor of your ...


4

The World Serpent is directly borrowed from real-world Norse mythology, in which the World Serpent Jörmungandr encircles the world and is destined to end it. The Serpent Kingdoms is a Forgotten Realms book, and like most Realms mythology, liberally borrowing from real-world mythology is a deliberate world-building choice to imply that our real world and the ...


4

Print(-ish) Well, your best bet is to read one of the Greyhawk sourcebooks that covers their deities. The Living Greyhawk Gazetteer is the most recent, but the original World of Greyhawk setting boxed set just became available in PDF from dndclassics.com. The later From The Ashes boxed set, the Greyhawk Adventures hardback, and the Player's Guide to ...


4

Inhabitants of Golarion are generally religious in one form or another, as exemplified by all the various gods and other beings that are worshipped there. Whether a deity or juju or following the Prophecies of Kalistrade, most everyone has one or more things they'd consider their patron. As the gods don't intercede directly, there are false gods (as in ...


3

Yes, Ultimate Campaign has support for building organizations out of "teams". See the Downtime rules on the d20PFSRD - it's harder to follow than reading the book, but the rules parts are all there: http://www.d20pfsrd.com/gamemastering/other-rules/downtime


3

Yes, the old deities are really coming back. Along with the list of old deities in the forgotten realms section of the gods listed in the updated basic rules, (and the gods listed among-st many pantheon in the player's handbook) there is also the "Sundering" story line. The Player's handbook lists 39 divine for the forgotten realms setting with their ...


3

No, but the Dead Three are still around Several gods died during the Time of Troubles, notably including the Dead Three: Bane, god of tyranny, Bhaal, god of murder, and Myrkul, god of death. However, gods are difficult to destroy in the Forgotten Realms, and all three of the dead gods have devised schemes to return to power. Bane’s plot was successful, and ...


3

One would think any good (and frankly even many Neutral) gods would have a place for opposition of black magic and foul sorcery. That's kinda like saying "who doesn't like murderers?" "Anyone but Norgorberites I guess?" is the answer. Even CN churches won't like it if there's enslaving/domination going on from the baddies. Good type gods that are the most ...


2

Version 0.2 of the Basic rules includes a list of Forgotten Realms deities, and it looks like most of the old deities have returned, including some that died before 3e was even released. Bhaal, Leira, and Mrykul -the three you mention in your question- are all back on the list. So are Azuth, Mystra, and Savras, and most of the other popular formerly-dead ...


2

1. Golarion has a less simplistic viewpoint than some other dnd settings - i'd compare it to Eberron more than I would Faerun or Greyhawk. Different pantheons are worshiped, certain deities are popular in certain countries and regions, certain countries are religious, and certain countries are, well, the opposite. It's closer to a setting like the Malazan ...


1

In earlier versions a paladin could be a paladin of pretty much anything he believed in, be it a god, a set moral code, a vague concept like 'justice', what have you. As long as it falls under "living by a code" and "believing in something" it was fine for a paladin. The exact contents did not matter so much. If it is not stated clearly in 5E, I'd say ...


1

I read Joes answer and do not quite agree with his stand point. In my opinion separating the in-game God you create/represent in your Campaign from the individual perception of God of your players is hard or impossible. TLDR; I think superimposing an 'artificial' conception of God in a campaign is not going to resolve the issues players may have with that ...



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