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11

There is not a canonical "D&D" answer. The answer differs per campaign world. I know it's a little weird - the D&D 3 core books don't present themselves as a generic system per se; they hint at a shared cosmology with the gods, certain roles for the races, etc. that makes it seem like there's a larger world there. But it's just a hollow shell, to ...


10

No, there's no overarching "truth" about where the gods come from in the implied setting of D&D 3.5. It's left up to the DM to detail this (if ever), like usual with blanks in published settings. However, if you dig into more specific D&D settings, you'll find creation myths that are more or less "the truth". In Greyhawk (from whence most of ...


9

In 4th ed, the only real mechanical differences you get from following a specific god are that it determines the types of Channel Divinity powers available to a Divine character, and perhaps allows some additional feats, paragon paths or backgrounds. Also, note that a Warpriest, an Essentials cleric, gets different powers based on the type of god (domain) ...


9

There is an optional rule called retraining from Ultimate Combat supplement. Keep in mind that this is from supplement and this rule is optional even if your DM actually applies that book, so consult your DM before using this solution. Class Feature Many choices you make about your class features can be retrained. It takes 5 days to retrain one ...


8

Sehanine is a Goddess that urges her followers to follow their own path in life, regardless of other people's sense of duty and moral, and she is the Goddess of love. How a God/Goddess will react to a character's change, depends on a lot of factors actually: You should take the following into consideration: How important is your player to the Goddess and ...


6

No... The Alignment Scale and D&D 4e Its important to note that Alignment was at the time of 4e's development a sacred cow. Now less so, but it was included because it was seen as a necessary part of a "D&D" game and they were trying to sell an edition to a player/fanbase who were already skeptical of design changes. While choosing your character ...


6

By RAW, you can cast Flame Strike all you want. This kind of restriction is technically a roleplaying thing. By the rules, there is nothing to prevent you from casting Flame Strike as a cleric of Auril. The only restrictions on what spells a cleric can cast based on his chosen deity are alignment-based, not based on energy types. However, you're likely ...


5

Although 2nd-party, according to Hal Maclean's article "Seven Deadly Domains: Spells for Sinners" (Dragon #323 62-6) the pride Domain is available from the following gods. Core Bahamut Beltar Corellon Larethian Heironeous Hextor Iuz Lolth Moradin Pelor Pholtus Tiamat Vecna Wastri Wee Jas Eberron Dol Arrah il-Yannah the Mockery Onatar Forgotten ...


4

It depends. Mechanically, the big thing to keep in mind is that in 4e, deities can't strip casters of their powers. Sehanine may choose to punish him in other ways, but he will still be a cleric. The rest is largely flavor. Sehanine is relatively easygoing, as gods go, so if he stays relatively close to Sehanine's ethos and doesn't actually make war on the ...


3

Sun Wukong, the Monkey King, is CN; all the 9 gods with Revelry as a domain are CG in a startling lack of originality (Cayden, Cernunnos, Desna, Hembad, Keltheald, Kofusachi, Marishi, Reymenda, Thisamet). If he looks too cuddly, you should see Stephen Chow's latest movie Journey to the West: Conquering the Demons where he's the bad guy. But I'd instead be ...


3

This is a complex question, for reasons I'll get into further down, but here's the Truth, as best as I've been able to determine based on pre-fourth edition sources: Nobody knows. The D&D Multiverse is so ancient, so full of history, that its origins are lost even to myth. Here's my evidence: As has been established over the years, even the gods of ...


1

Mechanically there are no benefits. Gods and alignment play little to no mechanical role in D&D 4th edition. Clerics can worship any god or none. Divine classes such as Clerics and Paladins have access to the same powers regardless of what god they worship or alignment they belong to. From a cursory inspection I cannot even find paragon paths or powers ...



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