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13

I sat down with both PDFs this morning and compared them system-by-system, drawing on my experience with B/X D&D and Adventurer Conqueror King System to zero-in on the parts of early D&D that frequently vary and make the most difference. These notes apply only to core Swords & Wizardry (not White Box), and core Labyrinth Lord (not including ...


10

BX doesn't put the same weight on the ability scores as you appear to, so beware that adding an ability score advancement mechanic will redirect some of your players motivations away from looking for harder-to-achieve bonuses to their effectiveness. On the other hand, you don't have to worry much about breaking the balance of the game with this, because ...


9

I finally managed to figure it out. I had to search for clipart instead of public domain art. Larry Elmore released the "Character Clip Art & Color Customizing Studio" which is a fancy name for a colouring book. A good portion of the black and white line drawings were clipart and could be used and modified, as long as they weren't resold as clip art ...


8

D&D Moldvay only covers to level 6. Cook wrote expert. However, Moldvay states: 4 2 1st level, 1 2nd level<br> 5 2 1st level, 2 2nd level<br> 6 3 1st level, 2 2nd level D&D Basic, p. B18 No third level clerical spells are included in Moldvay. Cook Expert shows your hop: L Title Spells 1 Acolyte - - - ...


8

There is DoubleZero: A Percentile-Based Modern Role Playing System by Berin Kinsman, a retroclone of the James Bond 007 RPG. It has mostly vanished from the net, but the SRD can still be found at http://livingfree.wikidot.com/doublezero-srd


6

The Dungeon Crawl Classics game seems to fit the above criteria, although it cuts off at level 10 as opposed to the RC's 36. It uses the RC's classes, including that of Dwarf/Elf/Halfling as self-contained classes as opposed to having racial mechanics. Ascending AC, attack bonuses, saves, all check. Fort, Reflex, Will saves - check.


5

There are several. 4C System is a retroclone of TSR's Marvel Super Heroes (FASERIP). Unlicensed, and some subtle differences (including ditching the labels) but it works the same way. There's a retroclone of Classic Traveller, I forget the name, but it's genericized (and not very well done, either). Separately, Mongoose Traveller is a pseudoclone of ...


3

In addition to all of the above plus the simple 1 per 4 levels of the d20 OGL you might look at a game called Chronicles of Ramalar. It had a system called Demeanor and Theme which each character had four circles with 12 dots around them. A goal was written in each circle and every time the character did something to advance to that goal a dot was colored ...


3

You also need to discuss expectations if you haven't already If you just change the mechanics to better fit the style of play that a highly lethal old-school module is written for, you need to discuss the expectations of this style of play with your players too. If you don't talk about these expectations, all that your players will see is that you've ...


2

Another possibility is Blood & Treasure which fits roughly in the RC space but using the three fold save system. It does a more AD&D1 style race/class mix with dual classing for humans (including half-orcs and half-elves) and multi-classing for other races.


2

Often, groups I've played with used the "whenever the DM feels like it" house rule. Frequently this was done in conjunction with one of several guidelines: As part of a finished quest: This could be a major milestone for the party as a whole (much like an XP reward) or when a character completes a specific, personal undertaking. Such a personal quest may ...


2

There are none, but it's possible that you don't actually need to increase scores. As far back as his proto-D&D Blackmoor campaign, Dave Arneson used a method where he would roll from two to five d6 (depending on the difficulty of the task) and roll under some relevant characteristic, plus 1 point for every two character levels. So if you were a ...


2

As already noted, this dates all the way back to the 1974 rules. There's no way to be certain what Gygax and Arneson were thinking when they wrote it that way, but there are a couple obvious points to consider: Clerics start getting spells at 2nd level, not 1st; Clerics reach name level at 8th level Name-level clerics cast two of every spell level. There ...


2

You have to remember that there is only 5 spell levels in the 1974 edition of Dungeons & Dragons. And that the original edition was developed through feedback from Gygax refereeing his Greyhawk campaign. It looks like that from level 1 to 5 the Cleric gained one new spell per level. Then with level 6, 7, & 8; the cleric gained two new spells per ...


1

The Simple Answer: From level 2-10: Every even level: +1 to ability of player's choice. From level 11-30: Every 4th level (i.e. 16, 20, 24, 28) Given that you're avoiding magical-items, it might be advisable to have some extra ability bumps. Although I'm not familiar with 'Basic Fantasy', it might be best to increase monster-stats slightly to maintain ...



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